Matthew Rosenberg spills the secrets behind this new group of Inhumans!

As Captain America’s big secret comes to light in Secret Empire, heroes will rise to the occasion and team up to stop this infiltration from within. But with most of the Royal Family headed into outer space, a group of younger Inhumans—plus Karnak—must unite to battle the threat of Hydra!

Launching in May, SECRET WARRIORS by Matthew Rosenberg and Javier Garron brings together Ms. Marvel, Quake, Inferno, Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, and Karnak to stand against an old friend now revealed as foe. With the “secret” out, we spoke with Rosenberg about how this new team comes together.

Marvel.com: In Secret Empire, Captain America’s full agenda as a Hydra operative comes to light. How does this affect the Inhumans and give birth to this new team of Secret Warriors?

Matthew Rosenberg: Well, Hydra aren’t the most tolerant of organizations, and the Inhumans are known to be a little “different,” so that puts them at odds. And really that is the birth of our Secret Warriors. Many of them are the Inhumans who are a little outside traditional Inhuman culture. They don’t all get along with each other, and they don’t all agree on how to do things, but they are forced together because of their common enemy. And I think that’s a key point to this book: it’s not about Inhumans, or super heroes, or anything like that. It’s about putting aside differences and trying to help people.

Marvel.com: As the Inhumans/Terrigen Mist story has unfolded over the last few years, the Royal Family has been front and center in protecting their people, particularly those just discovering they are Inhuman. What happens when most of them aren’t around to serve as that shield?

Matthew Rosenberg: You end up with a lot of people, especially young people, who are stuck trying to find their way on their own. Which I love, personally. These are characters whose heroes have left; their mentors have left and their government has left. And the question becomes, “Who are they on their own?” Obviously Ms. Marvel, Moon Girl, and Quake are all heroes on their own terms, but this still has some profound effects on them. There are opportunities for some of our cast to be the next great leaders of Inhuman society, and there are opportunities for some to cut those ties entirely. This is going to be a lot of big choices our Warriors have to make before all of this is over.

Marvel.com: One Royal who is sticking around is Karnak. What role will he play in the book?

Matthew Rosenberg: Karnak is much older, arguably wiser, and definitely crazier than the rest of the team. He assumes a sort of mentor/adviser role as we go, but things are never that easy with Karnak. But he definitely is good at breaking things and that will come up.

Marvel.com: With Quake and Ms. Marvel you have two young heroes with dynamically opposite experiences thus far in their careers—one has spent most of her time in the shadows as a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent, while the other has fully embraced the traditional costumed hero role, with a fresh “we can all make the world a better place” attitude. How do each of them react to the Captain America news?

Matthew Rosenberg: It’s funny because those two, their different life experiences, are the heart of the book in some ways. The spy vs. the super hero. But Captain America means so much to both of them that it is a real hard blow. It is the kind of thing that can make you question everything you believe in and even yourself. And how they deal with it, what they want to do about it, that is the challenge. Quake is always going to be a destructive force by nature. It’s who she is. And Ms. Marvel is a hero above all else. So watching them have their worlds rattled is a big part of the fun.

Marvel.com: Javier Garron has some experience with the Inhumans, coming off of Inhumans vs. X-Men. What’s it been like working with him on this next chapter in that saga?

Matthew Rosenberg: It’s been amazing! This book is really tricky in a lot of ways. We have a big cast of very iconic looking characters. We have a lot of crazy action and just as much real personal quiet moments. And Javier is just killing all of them. His work is so gorgeous, his characters feel so real, and his pages are so dynamic. There is a fight scene in issue #1 that I thought was pretty neat when I wrote it. Looking at Javier’s art, I think it will be something people really lose their minds over. It isn’t like anything I have seen in a Marvel book in a while. I’ll just leave it at that.

But yeah, this book is 100 percent the Javier Garron art show at this point. I just want to give him the coolest stuff to draw. Luckily for me, sometimes that is Quake sitting alone on the D train and sometimes it’s a dinosaur chasing Hydra agents through a forest. He makes all of it next-level cool.

Marvel.com: Finally, thus far at Marvel you’ve been working mainly on solo books like ROCKET RACCOON and KINGPIN, but now you’re not only getting to tackle a team, but one that’s playing a pretty big role in a Marvel Universe-wide event. What’s it been like for you, taking on Secret Warriors?

Matthew Rosenberg: It’s a dream come true. I know that is as cliché and cheesy an answer as it gets, but there is literally nothing else on Earth I’d rather be doing. Working with these characters, a lot of whom are the legitimate next generation of Marvel heroes, and getting to build their relationships and add little bits to their lives—it’s been amazing. Having Moon Girl and Karnak be weird to each other? Getting to make Quake and Ms. Marvel square off against each other? Helping Inferno become a true badass in the Marvel Universe? It’s the kind of job you hope to get one day if you write comics long enough. I am not taking a second of this for granted. I genuinely love these characters and I really hope that comes through on every page we put out.

It’s all out in the open this May when Matthew Rosenberg and Javier Garron present SECRET WARRIORS!

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Writer Mark Waid on creating new Avengers history ahead of the final issue!

In 1965, three criminals joined Captain America to redefine and rebuild the Avengers. Cap, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch, and Hawkeye became known as The Kookie Kwartet in one of the most momentous storylines in Avengers history, “The Old Order Changeth”—but, 52 years later, turns out their story wasn’t over.

AVENGERS POINT ONE writer Mark Waid and artist Barry Kitson have woven a new history into the fabric of the Marvel Universe. And the epic story, set across time and space from 1965 to 2017 and beyond, will conclude on March 29 with AVENGERS #5.1!

We sat down with Mark to discuss the art of telling an untold tale across Avengers eras, characters, and creators.

Marvel.com: What excited you most about enhancing a story that’s existed for so long? What new emphases did you want to bring to these characters?

Mark Waid: The appeal to me here was diving into a period of the Avengers that was really fraught with emotion and really fraught with soap opera, in a way they maybe haven’t been before or since quite that much. The idea that Captain America, who has been out of the ice—at this point in Marvel history—for about eight minutes, is handed the keys to the Avengers Mansion. Adding in three new criminals, who were not his choice to join the group. I was really intrigued by the ability to go back and deepen some of these relationships and do a little bit more, in a contemporary comics way, with how they felt about each other.

Marvel.com: Cap’s alignment with these three criminals—Hawkeye, Quicksilver, and Scarlet Witch—is one of the most fascinating components of this story. What’s your favorite aspect of writing that dynamic? How did you see it as specifically relevant today?

Mark Waid: My favorite element is Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch having to really acclimate to American culture. They’d never seen a television before. They weren’t stupid, but they were impoverished kids who came from an area in Europe where there was no industrialized background. So being able to play with that and being able to play with how they feel about suddenly being adored by people—going from being criminals to being, not only accepted, but considered heroes. That was the most fun of it for me.

Marvel.com: Is there a difference between the way you write the 1965 iterations of these characters and the way you write the 2017 versions? Do you approach them differently?

Mark Waid: The characters, no, I don’t approach them differently than I would today. That’s kind of what makes it fun. Taking my modern bag of tools and doing the kind of emotional beats that Stan Lee couldn’t do back in the day because it just wasn’t done. And doing that in the context of a much simpler Marvel Universe is what makes the whole thing appealing.

Marvel.com: What are the in-universe challenges of telling a new story that’s set in the midst of an old one?

Mark Waid: The specific challenge, and it’s one that I actually enjoy—working with editor Tom Brevoort trying to deal with this—is making sure that it fits. Constantly making sure that we get it right, making sure that we don’t screw up anything, or make it impossible to consider this something that actually happens between issues #16 and #17 of the 1965 series. And it’s not easy; sometimes I would plot something and have it ready for scripting and then I would realize, or Tom would realize, that the Avengers hadn’t done that by that point, or these characters hadn’t met yet, or this guy’s wearing a different suit, or whatever. But that wasn’t a hindrance to us, that was actually the fun of playing in that sandbox.

Marvel.com: Are there specific or unique creative obstacles that come with this kind of project?

Mark Waid: Not really, because here’s the thing: I have grown incredibly tired of pastiche. I don’t enjoy the attempt to emulate something so perfect [like Stan Lee’s voice] so concretely that it’s indistinguishable from what you’re trying to copy. We already had enough elements that are reflective of 1965—the style of lettering, the way the display lettering is done. So, to me, if I wanted to write this as if it was published in 1965, if I wanted to write it in Stan Lee’s voice, then I could have done that, but then it would’ve felt cheap. We wanted to have our own story, using more contemporary storytelling tools.

Marvel.com: You’ve worked with Barry Kitson for years now, so considering the source material, was your process for the Point One series any different relative to your past work together?

Mark Waid: No, actually it was very similar. The first issue had actually been written full script before we even had an artist, so I’m not used to working that way with Barry. But for the next four issues, once we had Barry on board, then its about letting Barry run with the action and the pacing. And then I would do the dialogue based on my original notes and whatever notes Barry gave in the margins. So it was very much the same way we’ve worked for years and years. We know each others’ rhythms by now and how to work together and how to trust each other.

Witness the grand finale with AVENGERS #5.1, by Mark Waid and artist Barry Kitson, on March 29!

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Richards and Doom go head to head in another round in the upcoming installment of Infamous Iron Man

Reed Richards makes an appearance in INFAMOUS IRON MAN #7, out April 26, but it’s not the famous Mister Fantastic of the equally famous Fantastic Four, but rather the infamous alternate Reed from the equally infamous Ultimate universe. And that ain’t a good thing.

So, that begs the question “Do all alternate versions of Reed Richards stand for evil?” Well, come with us on a brief tour of Reeds and we’ll see if we can answer that…

The Maker – ULTIMATE FANTASTIC FOUR #1

The real problem with this Reed lay in his serious belief in the “ultimate” tag. With heightened intelligence from cosmic rays and a monstrously big ego, Ultimate Reed eventually declared himself “The Maker” and tried to ditch his own reality for a “better” one, which led him to ally himself with the real Reed during Doctor Doom’s whole Secret Wars deal. Then he betrayed everyone and the Molecule Man zapped him into pizza. And now he’s back somehow and…we’re betting Doom’s not going to be too happy about that. 

Ultimate Fantastic Four (2003) #1

Ultimate Fantastic Four (2003) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Brute – MARVEL PREMIERE #2

The Reed Richards from the High Evolutionary’s Counter Earth discovered he could transform into a giant purple evil thing called the Brute, which prompted him to join the Frightful Four to destroy the real Fantastic Four. In the end, he managed to sacrifice himself to help our Reed defeat Annihilus in the Negative Zone, but rumors of his survival keep surfacing. 

Marvel Premiere (1972) #2

Marvel Premiere (1972) #2

  • Published: May 10, 1972
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Cover Artist: Gil Kane
What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Dark Raider – FANTASTIC FOUR #387

Another Reed Richard unsatisfied with his own name, the so-called Dark Raider fell into madness after losing his family to Galactus and decided to seek out and obliterate every other Reed that existed anywhere. A rogue Watcher called Aron seemingly destroyed the Raider, but he returned just so the Invisible Woman could destroy him herself. 

Fantastic Four (1961) #387

Fantastic Four (1961) #387

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Zombie – ULTIMATE FANTASTIC FOUR #21

This Reed really took the cake when he deliberately infected the rest of his team with a zombie virus, just because he basically thought it seemed pretty cool. A real nutjob, Zombie Reed met Ultimate Reed for a showdown before ultimately falling to pieces when he ran up against the righteous indignation of Ultimate Invisible Girl. 

Ultimate Fantastic Four (2003) #21

Ultimate Fantastic Four (2003) #21

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Council – FANTASTIC FOUR #570
Hmm, maybe we’re getting somewhere now. Okay, our Reed Richards discovered an entire council of alternate versions of himself, banded together to compare notes and whatever stuff brainy science-types do when they get together. At first Reed thought he’d enjoy the company, but upon realizing the others lacked his compassion, he left the group. Good thing because, uh-oh, Celestials killed all but four of them and those survivors invaded our Earth and…dang. Evil Reeds. 

Fantastic Four (1998) #570

Fantastic Four (1998) #570

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Ape – MARVEL APES #1

Wait! Can it be? A good alternate version of Reed Richards? Yes, simian Reed helped the Gibbon return to the real Earth after meeting him on Ape Earth, and also identified the vampire Baron Blood posing as Captain America before regretfully being killed by said baron. Whew. Leave it to an ape to make an ape out of all those bad Reed Richardses… 

Marvel Apes (2008) #1

Marvel Apes (2008) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Doom is the hero? Richards is the villain? It is a world gone mad! Found out who will come out on top in INFAMOUS IRON MAN #7 by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev, available April 26!

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Hear from the host of Hot 97 and ESPN's Cheap Heat!

DJ Juanyto (Hot 97 and Feed the Meter podcast) and Stat Guy Greg (ESPN’s Cheap Heat podcast) join the show to talk about Marvel Comics and its connection to hip hop, growing up in New York City, wrestling, Spider-Man, the ‘90s X-Men cartoon, and much more.

Download episode #281.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com, check out Marvel Podcast Central, grab the TWiM RSS feed and subscribe to This Week in Marvel on iTunes or Soundcloud! Head over now to our new hub to listen to the full run of This Week in Marvel including our latest episode!

This Week in Marvel focuses on delivering all the Marvel info on news and new releases–from comics to video games to toys to TV to film and beyond! New episodes will be released every Tuesday and Thursday (or so) and TWiM is co-hosted by Marvel VP Executive Editor of Digital Media Ryan “Agent M” Penagos and Editorial Director of Marvel Digital Media Ben Morse with Manager, Video & Content Production: Blake Garris, Editor Marc Strom, and Assistant Editor Christine Dinh. We also want your feedback, as well as questions for us to answer on future episodes! Tweet your questions, comments and thoughts about TWiM to @AgentM, @BenJMorse, @blakegarris or @Marvel with the hashtag #ThisWeekinMarvel!

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Announcing Cheung, Garney, ACO, Noto, Land, Rosanas and more bringing the story to life!

It shouldn’t be too astonishing that the X-Men are as popular as they are. After all, their collection of diverse of mutants offers a never-ending grab bag of super powered mayhem that usually goes toward saving the day–when they’re not too busy butting heads with the Inhumans, that is. Simply put, there is no shortage of classic “X-Men” content and one particular title is about to re-enter the limelight.

After a four-year hiatus, Marvel is bringing back the “Astonishing X-Men” series this summer under the confident pen of writer, Charles Soule who’s not too worried that he’s got some big shoes to fill. We’re also excited to announce that Jim Cheung, Ron Garney, ACO, Phil Noto, Greg Land, Ramon Rosanas and more will be bringing the serialized, ongoing story to life with some incredible artwork.

Get pumped for the returning title by checking out our interview with Charles who discusses the book’s iconic cast, its use of the entirety of Marvel history and how the series will mutate under his skilled direction.

Marvel.com: “Astonishing X-Men” is a title whose original run spanned from the mid-1990s to 2013. What was the most exciting part about being the person responsible for relaunching it?

Charles Soule: “Astonishing” is one of the fundamental “X”-titles for me, especially the Whedon/Cassaday run. It’s some of the best “X-Men” storytelling of all time. So, exciting, yes – also somewhat terrifying. But like any book I take on, I’ll do my best.

Marvel.com: Over the years, the series was written by a litany of big Marvel creative minds like Joss Whedon, Warren Ellis, Marjorie Liu and Greg Pak. How were you hoping to approach it differently than these writers did in the past? How did you pour your own heart and, forgive me, soul into the writing?

Charles Soule: I’d like to think that any story I do will be different from the other incredible talents who have worked under this banner in the past, just because I’m not them. This sort of “Murderer’s Row” legacy isn’t anything new to me, though – from my very first Marvel project (“Thunderbolts”) to Daredevil to pretty much everything I’ve done, I’ve been working on titles that have superstar creators in their past. You just put your head down and write your story and hope that it can stand next to the other books in the line.

Marvel.com: Going off that, can you talk a little bit about the artistic vision you had for the look and feel of the series?

Charles Soule: I mostly want it to feel epic. I’m trying to go as big as I can both for character moments and “page-feel,” if that’s a term I can coin. I remember when Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch were working in what was termed “widescreen” back on their “Ultimates” project. I’d say it’s something like that, but within every massive beat there’s a character moment (or ten) to back it up. Mostly, I wanted to anchor “Astonishing X-Men” in the real world, so-to-speak. Many times the big superhero stories take place away from population centers, especially mutant stories. I get it – a superhero slugfest with a bunch of civilians around complicates things immensely. I’ve done it myself many times. Setting your battle scene on a remote glacier solves a lot of storytelling problems. However, I think the X-Men are at their best story-wise when they’re not only fighting super-villains, but their activities are seen through the lens of the human world. So, we’ll get a lot of that here – a lot of the action takes place in the heart of London, with all the attendant repercussions. Good times all around.

Marvel.com: We know the series will feature a veritable Who’s Who of fan favorite X-Men (i.e. Old Man Logan, Archangel, Mystique, Rogue, Gambit, Psylocke and Fantomex), but what can you tell us about the villains being featured in the story?

Charles Soule: Not too much just yet… but we’ll get there! I want it to feel like a nice reveal, but the way the story is designed I can pull in bad guys from literally any era of Marvel history. The book is built like a bit of a puzzle box, with multiple layers of reveals. Part of the fun of certain “X”-stories is speculating about what’s really going on, and this is definitely one of those.

Marvel.com: Now onto the heroes. What was the decision process behind choosing these specific characters to make up this team other than being adored by fans and veterans of the original run?

Charles Soule: It’s a mix of characters who I really wanted to write and characters who hadn’t been seen in a bit, or both! I wanted a bunch of people I knew I could write well, but who also had lots of history with each other. All of these people have been “bad guys” at one point or another – checkered pasts all around. Many of them have dated each other, or have been in love triangles… it’s just a feast of drama, and the soap opera stuff is part of what makes the X-Men great. It’s fun to write all these folks, especially in a really focused story like I’m telling in Astonishing. The book has a specific point, story and end goal… which you’ll see soon enough!

Marvel.com: Will we be seeing a different team dynamic than we’ve seen in the past and were there any specific characters you had a blast writing?

Charles Soule: I’ve said this before, but this book doesn’t have a team. It has a cast. It doesn’t have a leader, either. It’s like a novel, or a film, or a TV series. There are characters who are more or less prominent from scene to scene, but this isn’t a story about superheroes coming together with a shared goal to fight bad guys, with a base, and cool coordinated costumes and so on. This is a bunch of flawed, extremely powerful individuals who find themselves in the same place at the same time as something very intense and potentially world-ending happens. Then, we see what they do next. It’s a pretty cool ride, I think.

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Follow artist Sara Pichelli on her journey from animator to the co-creator of Miles Morales!

This March, we celebrate Women’s History Month by spotlighting some of the most iconic characters and creators from the Marvel Universe.

Artist Sara Pichelli burst onto the scene in 2007, earning fans right off the bat thanks to her dynamic, yet emotive style. By the following year, she did her first book for Marvel – NYX: NO WAY HOME #3 – and the rest, as they say, is history!

After finishing that series with #6, Pichelli moved right over to RUNAWAY with #10 and stuck around until #14, the last issue of that volume. From there she drew books like X-MEN: PIXIE STRIKES BACK, the NAMORA one-shot and contributed to both HER-OES and GIRL COMICS.

Then, the artist skyrocketed into the public consciousness when she joined Brian Michael Bendis on ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN starting with #15. The series then jumped back to its previous numbering with the next installment and ran until Peter Parker died in the pages of #160

Ultimate Comics Spider-Man (2009) #160

Ultimate Comics Spider-Man (2009) #160

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Pichelli drew up to #155 on that volume, but then contributed the very first look at Peter’s replacement, Miles Morales, in the pages of ULTIMATE FALLOUT #4. She then proceeded to debut ULTIMATE COMICS SPIDER-MAN with Bendis, returning for other issues and covers throughout the book’s run. 

Ultimate Fallout (2011) #4

Ultimate Fallout (2011) #4

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Pichelli and Bendis also teamed up on SPIDER-MEN, the first meeting of the classic Peter Parker with the Ultimate Universe’s Miles Morales. The duo, proving both well suited for one another and incredibly popular, joined forces in 2013 for another major series, GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY.

The collaborations don’t stop there, of course. They worked together on issues of ALL-NEW X-MEN and also came together to bring Miles Morales into the Marvel Universe after SECRET WARS in a series called SPIDER-MAN that’s still going strong to this day. 

Spider-Man (2016) #14

Spider-Man (2016) #14

The Women Of Marvel

As Pichelli herself related in a 2014 Marvel.com interview, she credited C.B. Cebulski with discovering her. “In 2008 I lost my job at an animation studio where I was working as a character designer,” she said. “And since I was starting to feel the urge to explore a new media—in order to have more control of my artwork—I took advantage of this transition to take a stab at becoming a comic book artist. I started to be interested in comics thanks to my amazing partner—and also a comic book artist—David Messina a couple of years before, and it was love at first sight.” She then did work for IDW, but entered Cebulski’s international Marvel talent search called Chesterquest contest which drew attention to her skills and lead to those early Marvel books!

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Enjoy the latest episode of the official Marvel podcast, with comics, movies, TV, games, and more!

We’ve got a brand new episode of This Week in Marvel, presented by Loot Crate, to help you kick off the weekend!

Ben and Ryan give you the rundown on this week’s hottest comics releases, including CAPTAIN AMERICA, IRON FIST, and more. The editors behind Secret Empire share their secrets (58:31), MSG’s Arda Ocal stops by (1:25:33), plus all the news from the West Coast (1:12:03), reviews, and more (1:33:29) that you expect from the official Marvel podcast!

For the next This Week in Marvel Unlimited Reading Club, tackle alternate realities with the West Coast and PUNISHER NOIR. Be sure to share your thoughts with us using the hashtag #TWIMURC!

Loot Crate has assembled the Marvel Gear and Goods crate for the ultimate Marvel fan. This crate features official Marvel items like collectible home goods, apparel and more every other month! So you just stopped Thanos from undoing reality (again) and Nova Prime is probably going to spend weeks on the paperwork alone. Here’s an Infinity Gem of an idea: let’s kick off the space boots, head to the backyard and have a COSMIC PARTY! We’re inviting a motley crew of galactic greats and they’re bringing essential party items featuring the Guardians of the Galaxy, Captain Marvel herself and the Nova Corps! Order by 5/15 at 9pm PT by heading to lootcrate.com/MarvelGear and use promo code “MARVELPOD” to save $3 on your subscription today.

Download episode #282 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com, check out Marvel Podcast Centralgrab the TWiM RSS feed and subscribe to This Week in Marvel on iTunes, so you never miss an episode! We are now also on Soundcloud! Head over now to our new hub to listen to the full run of This Week in Marvel!

This Week in Marvel will focus on delivering all the Marvel info on news and new releases–from comics to video games to toys to TV to film and beyond! New episodes will be released every Thursday (or so) and TWiM is co-hosted by Marvel VP & Executive Editor of Digital Media Ryan “Agent M” Penagos and Marvel Editorial Director of Digital Media Ben Morse, along with Marvel.com Editor Marc Strom, Marvel.com Assistant Editor Christine Dinh, and Manager of Video & Content Production Blake Garris. We also want your feedback, as well as questions for us to answer on future episodes!  Tweet your questions, comments and thoughts about TWiM to @AgentM@BenJMorse, @chrissypedia or @Marvel with the hashtag #ThisWeekinMarvel!

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Danny Rand journeys from the mystic village of K'un Lun to Netflix!

Every Friday we use the powers of Marvel Unlimited to look back at the very first appearance of a major character, place or object that made waves this week.

Considering Danny Rand not only just debuted his own Netflix series, but also starred in a new comic by Ed Brisson and Mike Perkins, it couldn’t be a better time to take a glance back at his debut in the pages of MARVEL PREMIERE #15.

The issue, which dropped in 1974, came from the minds of Roy Thomas and Gil Kane. It opened with Iron Fist taking on a quartet of trained attackers for an audience that included Yu-Ti – otherwise known as the August Personage of Jade – and the four hooded Dragon Kings.

Having defeated his opponents, Iron Fist looked up to Yu-Ti asking about The Challenge of the One when the elder asked him to think back on his past. This filled in the reader about a 9-year-old boy who scaled a mountain with his parents Wendell and Heather as well as his dad’s business partner a decade prior in search of K’un Lun.

That journey ended for his father, when Meacham, the business partner, took advantage of a minor accident to distract them from his true intent: murdering Danny’s dad. Remembering the focus he and his mother had in trying to climb down to safety, Iron Fist used that in his battle with the silent, deadly and huge Shu-Hu.

Danny failed to gain the upper hand with this challenge and soon found himself being battered around. In an effort to regain his focus, he dug even deeper into the memory of surviving with his mother in the unforgiving mountains, hiding in caves and avoiding wolves. While the hungry pack chased them, Danny and his mother saw the bridge to K’un Lun, but Heather didn’t think they’d make it so she thrust her son ahead and then ran back, offering herself to their pursuers.

The memory of his mother’s bravery spurred Danny on to battle his enemy more fiercely than before, actually spilling over into a berserker rage. Fully back in the fight, he won the match upon funneling his will to his fist which “becomes like unto a thing of iron!” Of course, this would be just the first of many fights we’d see Iron Fist take on as he’d travel through the Marvel Universe joining groups like the Heroes for Hire, New Avengers and even The Defenders.

During his run on PREMIERE, which went until #25, other luminaries like Larry Hama, Chris Claremont, Len Wein and John Byrne worked on the character. Danny then starred in his own ongoing series for 15 issues though the final story carried over to MARVEL TEAM-UP #63-64.

And then true comic book magic happened when the powers that be teamed Rand with Luke Cage in POWER MAN & IRON FIST, a partnership that continues to give readers a thrill to this day. In fact, a series of that same name can be found on shelves right now even as the new IRON FIST series kicks off.

Flash Forward

In the pages of IMMORTAL IRON FIST, Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction, David Aja and others expanded upon the mythology of Iron Fist. They not only chronicled the adventures of other, previous bearers of the name, but also expanded on the idea of K’un Lun as one of many mystical cities with their own warriors. Readers met the likes of Fat Cobra, Dog Brother #1, Bride of Nine Spiders, Prince of Orphans, Tiger’s Beautiful Daughter and Steel Phoenix.

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Artist ACO opens his secret files for a your eyes only sneak peek!

Don’t tell HYDRA, but Nick Fury’s about to make his presence felt much more starting April 19. The new self-titled series, NICK FURY, by writer James Robinson and artist ACO, promises to send the junior Fury on a series of adventures that will continue the long tradition of espionage-filled stories against the backdrop of the Marvel Universe!

NICK FURY promises to move the title hero along at a whip-fast clip in a series of assignments each taking up just a single issue. Some of the adventures will be confined to a train while others dive deep into Atlantis or glitter in the French Riviera. Fury will also find himself up against a new foe: Frankie Noble, Agent of HYDRA.

We talk with ACO about playing with all of the best spy-related toys like exotic locales and sleek gadgets, as well as working on a character with such iconic ties to a master artist.

Marvel.com: Nick Fury comics have had a history of incorporating some pretty innovative artistic approaches from the likes of Jack Kirby, Jim Steranko, and others. Did you look back at any of those artists for inspiration while thinking about your take on this character?

ACO: Absolutely, as soon as I received the proposal I reviewed the whole stage of Steranko with the character. His comics were an explosion of creativity, narrative, and design that continue to influence hundreds of artists. A milestone in the history of the comic book. Also, it is impossible to separate Nick Fury from Jim Steranko.

For this collection I also had in mind his comic book adaptation of the movie “Outland.” The way he manipulates the page and plays with the reader is something unique.

I have tried to filter all those works and look for my own voice for this specific title. I hope the reader could be able to notice it. Emulating the brilliance of Steranko is something impossible, only David Ajá approaches him in genius.

Marvel.com: You’ve become well known for your intricate panel and page designs, which looks like it’s carrying through to NICK FURY. Does James write those into the script or do you develop them from what’s on the page?

ACO: James is very open with art and page composition. He indicates which panels are important and adds the dialogue for me. Then, he allows me to work with complete freedom, doing things my way. That trust is something I value very much. I play a lot with composition, adding and removing scenes after having consulted with him, always trying to stay true to his original idea, and James is always very receptive and open to dialogue. It is very pleasant to work without a leash and with the scriptwriter’s trust. Being given your own space to develop the story, to me, is priceless

Marvel.com: From your perspective, what sets the younger Nick Fury apart from the elder in terms of how he carries himself and goes about his business as a spy?

ACO: I think old Nick has had stories in which world security depended solely on him. Always on the verge of the cataclysm, with great villains with plans of world domination and where he is in his element. This Nick takes care of small missions, not to the scale of his father. That helps him to take spying in a funnier and lighter way. Indeed, global security also depends on him, but this is no excuse for not having a good time while saving the day.

Marvel.com: It sounds like you and James will be putting Fury through his paces everywhere from a train to Atlantis. Was that major mix of ideas and locales a draw for you as an artist?

ACO: Having so many environments forces you to think and consider each episode in a very different way. We have to take into account many aspects; for example, how the characters are going to move depending on the setting they are in, what technology should be used, which architectural style should be the most suitable for each scenario, what costumes and equipment he should carry. Searching for meaning and functionality depending on where the story takes place is something that I love and find amusing.

Marvel.com: As you mentioned, in addition to the various locales, the book also features high tech spy gear. Do you enjoy making those items come to life on the page?

ACO: Yes, I love using gadgets and visual cues for the reader. Whether in the form of an onomatopoeia, a map, a counter or with icons, it makes the visual experience richer and brings a lot of dynamism to the page.

Marvel.com: What can you tell us about the development process for Frankie Noble, Agent of HYDRA?

ACO: I wanted to give it a retro, quirky and sexy look. Something like the Lady Gaga of HYDRA. We should give it a unique look within a uniformed organization. It was also important to give her her own “patch.” Something that made her recognizable, that’s why she wears wigs and has a mole. My initial proposal was that she could wear a different wig in each appearance, but this might end up confusing the reader, so we decided she should wear only one. The fact that she doesn’t have any hair helps to give the character a greater background. Adding the mole was Mark Paniccia’s idea, the editor, which helps to identify the character quickly.

The spy games begin on April 19 in NICK FURY #1 by James Robinson and ACO!

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Charles Soule guides the Man Without Fear through the legal system!

It may be a cliché that not all heroes wear capes, but can super heroes still be champions for good when they’re not running around in costume saving the day? That’s exactly what Matt Murdock seeks to prove in the upcoming “Supreme” arc of DAREDEVIL from writer Charles Soule. He’s foregoing the usual red, skin tight number in favor of a simple suit and tie as part of a plan to take care of crime in New York with the legitimate fists of the legal system.

However, Matt’s tour de force of lawyerly prowess could prove to be the undoing of not only the bad guys, but all of New York’s vigilantes as well. Even his recently recovered secret identity stands at stake in this story, which promises to be an explosive courtroom drama chock full of surprises, exciting cameos, and homages to classic sitcom tropes.

Since Charles practices as an attorney, we asked him to make a few opening statements on behalf of “Supreme.” He’s far from resting his case, your honor. In fact, it’s just waking up.

Marvel.com: In this story arc, Matt has a plan to take care of crime in Manhattan via the legal system as opposed to his vigilante work as Daredevil. As a practicing lawyer and fellow Columbia Law graduate, were the specifics for this arc drawn from your own experiences as an attorney? If so, can you go into detail about your inspirations without breaching attorney-client privilege?

Charles Soule: I’ve been building to this story since I first started thinking about my run [on DAREDEVIL]. This has been what it’s all been about, from the start. This is why Matt joined the DA’s office, it’s what he decided to do with his secret identity, all of it. He has a plan based on a particular area of criminal law that I came up with when I was doing my initial research, talking to people who’ve worked in the Manhattan DA’s office, etc. The funny thing—while I am a practicing attorney, I don’t work in this particular area, and so I am sure I’m screwing stuff up as far as the specifics. That’s okay, though, I have a wonderful crutch to rely on for that stuff: “Law is a little different in the Marvel Universe.”

Marvel.com: Are there any holdover repercussions from the “Purple” arc that centers around Matt trying to hold onto his secret identity?

Charles Soule: The whole “Supreme” arc is all about it. We learned in “Purple” what Matt did to put his identity as Daredevil back in the bottle, and in “Supreme” all of that is put at risk. We understand the stakes.

Marvel.com: What is the climate like in New York City to allow Matt to take this route rather than just beat the snot out of bad guys as Daredevil?

Charles Soule: Beating up bad guys is great, but it’s a one-at-a-time sort of solution. Every once in a while maybe you can take down a big player like an Owl or even a Kingpin, but just because you beat someone up doesn’t mean they will actually get convicted of a crime and go to prison. Matt’s plan here is designed to bring his vigilante work and his legal work closer together—and not just for him, but for everyone like him. The Spider-Mans, the Blindspots, the Ms. Marvels— everyone with a secret identity working in New York as a vigilante could be affected by what he’s doing.



Marvel.com:  Moreover, how does he feel about the possibility that the city may not need the hero after this case is over?

Charles Soule: He’s not worried about that at all. New York will always need heroes.

Marvel.com:  The criminal underworld can’t be happy about this trial. What action will they be taking to stop Matt?

Charles Soule: Stay tuned. That’s a huge part of the story. We’ll see some great bad guy appearances here, including the return of a fun Z-lister from the 90s, another long-demanded character from my SHE-HULK run with Javier Pulido, and another massive Daredevil bad guy I haven’t used yet.

Marvel.com: The irony of Daredevil needing to take the stand and testify is a bit of a two-dates-to-the-prom—or courtroom in this case—situation for Matt. How will he go about handling that particular dilemma?

Charles Soule: That’s issue #22—and man, it’s fun to write that stuff. Classic silly sitcom with super heroes material.

Marvel.com: Luke Cage and Echo will be guest starring in this arc. What will their roles be in this case? Will they be taking to the stand and should we prepare for any other cameos?

Charles Soule: They show up early, but we shift away from them to allow for some other folks to appear. I’m trying to get in a bunch of cool cameos here; don’t want to spoil it, but I had Daredevil appear in a big three-part story in my SHE-HULK run. It might be time to return that favor…

Charles Soule kicks off “Supreme” in DAREDEVIL #21, coming this June!

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