Celebrate the fashion inspired by the upcoming Marvel Studios film!

Last night, Marvel Studios hosted a New York Fashion Week event to celebrate “Black Panther” and showcase bespoke designer pieces and capsule collections inspired by the film.

CHROMAT, Cushnie et Ochs, Fear of God, Ikiré Jones, Laquan Smith, Sophie Theallet, and Tome, who were selected for their dedication to empowerment and individualism through fashion, created one-of-a-kind pieces interpreting different characters and themes from the movie.

Brother Vellies, Douriean Fletcher and Josh Bennett created capsule collections that will also be available for purchase on their respective websites as of today.

Take a look at the items on display in an immersive, Wakanda-inspired venue as well as the inspiration behind these pieces in the gallery below!

Following the event, the one-of-a-kind looks will be auctioned off via CharityBuzz.com in support of the humanitarian organization, Save the Children.

Get your tickets now for “Black Panther” and stay tuned for even more royal action in the coming days!

“Black Panther” hits theaters February 16! While you await the King, follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page!

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The styling of Black Panther and the Dora Milaje are rooted In tradition.

Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” is now open in theaters and its debut brings the pages of the historic comics to life. Making the characters in the fictional world a reality was tasked to costume designer Ruth Carter. Inspired by not one, but many different places in Africa, Carter melded the cultural aesthetics together to create a cohesive look that felt distinctly Wakandan.

With the world of Wakanda rooted in African tradition, the costuming worked in tandem with production designer Hannah Bleacher’s elaborate set design. Carter made sure the color palette complimented the the landscapes and the elaborate tribal garb of Wakanda’s tribes: “They were very strict about the color palates. There are the River Tribe, which is green. There’s the Border Tribe, which is blue. There’s the Panther and the Royal Palace, which is black and royal purple. The Jabaris, which are wood. We had a very clear direction and that came from [director] Ryan [Coogler].” The distinct color palettes reflected appropriate African customs along with Wakanda’s mysterious futuristic technology.

Costume Designer Ruth Carter and Director Ryan Coogler on set with Winston Duke (M’Baku)

“Most people who read the comic books know Wakanda is a mountainous area, and it’s a secret place that’s not necessarily trading and interacting with the rest of the world,” said Carter. “They’re more advanced in technology than the other civilizations. We are creating that world and trying to create a culture and pride that feels authentic to the specific location.”

“Wakanda is this cast unknown world and, ultimately, the challenge of the unknown is what appealed to me on so many levels.” Carter spoke about how intimidating it was to take on the daunting task of created a beloved fictional world. ” Beyond what has been established in the comic realm, I knew very little about it but as I began my research, I realized we could create from a place of fantasy, a place of African culture and a place of imagination. Everybody had their own take on what Black Panther’s world was but it had never really been translated to film which was very exciting.”

Wakanda’s key resource played a big part in costume design, since the new Black Panther suit is supposedly interwoven with vibranium. Carter created the vibranium layer from a silver missile suit, visible unsheathed and overlay of thin fabric imprinted with a repeat tribal triangle pattern known as Okavango—a nod to the Okavango river delta in northern Botswana.

“The new suit is a little bit more streamlined and Black Panther can do a whole lot more with less,” said Carter. Coogler explained how the suit isn’t actually a superhero suit, but a military uniform. The suit also has a subtle medallion emblazon over the chest plate and a new panther-tooth necklace that bolsters the tribal feel.

Carter explains the new streamlined suit, “what we wanted to do was take it into a new millennium, a new attitude, a new technology, and make it exciting again. And then sometimes, you know, cultures can come together with super heroes.”

The most integral and visually recognizable part of the Black Panther comics are the Dora Milaje, the fierce women warriors who are charged with protecting T’Challa. Carter created their look by thinking about the reality and complexity of being a female warrior, but still focusing on feeling empowering. “In regards to the Dora Milaje, we wanted to make them have more of a presence. More of a strength of authority than they did have. We developed more as a real warrior might be developed. Real warriors who need their arms protected and need to have shields, and armor, and weaponry and shoes—like they’re really going to go to battle.”

The Dora Milaje outfits were based on tribal influences, and their distinct red color from the comics remained. Meanwhile the tabard or harness needed to have meaning. Likened to a prized heirloom that might be passed from mother to daughter to use over generations, the idea made the look become grounded in tradition. Carter also beaded them with little charms for protection, like talismans for protection and good spirit.

Combining traditional looks with modern influences is what made the Wakandan look uniquely its own. Carter explained, “In that it’s a barefoot culture, they’re advanced in technology. What are they wearing? Is it corny to have something lighting up? Our DP, she walks around with her headset on, and the light is blinking all the time. And I was like, Wakanda! It’s like here every day. So that’s kind of how I feel like you can actually, after watching this film, see things that way, you could point at and say, that’s Wakanda.”

Hear more from Ruth Carter at Marvel Studios’ Black Panther World Premiere Red Carpet below:

Want even more insight into Ruth Carter’s designs, the world of Wakanda and Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther”? Pick up MARVEL’S BLACK PANTHER: THE ART OF THE MOVIE out now. Go behind the scenes with exclusive concept artwork and in-depth analysis from the filmmakers in this keepsake volume! 

To see the world of Wakanda come alive for yourself, catch “Black Panther” in theaters today!

Are you ready to meet the King? Follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page for all the latest news and updates!

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Synchrony Bank donates grant to program.

Late last month, Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” director Ryan Coogler attended the Fellows Session at Ghetto Film School, an award-winning nonprofit founded in 2000 to educate, develop and celebrate the next generation of great American storytellers, in Los Angeles.

Coogler was there to surprise 30 students by announcing that Synchrony Bank, a promotional parter on “Black Panther,” is donating a $50,000 grant to the Ghetto Film School Fellows program and invited them to the world premiere of “Black Panther.” Watch the surprise above!

The Synchrony Families That Work program focuses to alleviate childcare responsibilities for working families by supporting quality after-school, summer and weekend programs for kids, like the summer Fellows Program, which aims to educate, develop and celebrate the next generation of great American storytellers.

To learn more about the Ghetto Film School, head over to www.ghettofilm.org.

Get your tickets now for “Black Panther” and stay tuned for even more royal action in the coming days!

“Black Panther” hits theaters February 16! While you await the King, follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page!

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We go behind the scenes on Marvel Studios' Black Panther with Set Designer & Jewelry Designer!

We’re back this week as we go behind the scenes on Marvel Studios’ Black Panther as Lorraine Cink talks to Production Designer Hannah Beachler in helping to build the beautiful African-inspired sets, plus Judy Stephens chats to Wearable-Art Designer Douriean Fletcher about creating gold, silver and vibranium jewelry work by the Dora Milaje and more!

Listen to the Women of Marvel – Episode 161 now!

Learn more about the Black Panther fashion event and charity

 

www.charitybuzz.com/BlackPanther

 

Produced by Judy Stephens and Brandon Grugle
Associate Produced by Chloe Wilson
Art by Allyson Wakeman
Music by Karen Kanan Corrêa

——————–

The Women of Marvel podcast assemble to chat all things Marvel and more! New episodes will be released every Thursday, co-hosted by Marvel VP, Content and Character Development Sana Amanat, Marvel.com Producer Judy Stephens, along with Assistant Editor Christina Harrington and Talent & Senior Creative Producer Lorraine Cink.

Have feedback or questions? Email us at WomenOf@marvel.com, or tweet your questions and comments to @Marvel with the hashtag #WomenOfMarvel.

 

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A quick guide and glossary on the who’s who of Wakanda, tribe and tech heading into the theater.

Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, the Black Panther made his first appearance in comic books in 1966, in FANTASTIC FOUR #52. Invited to visit by King T’Challa himself, it’s here that the First Family of Heroes gets a closer look at Black Panther’s homeland of Wakanda.

Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” picks up exactly where “Captain America: Civil War” leaves off. The film tackles the story of T’Challa who is a young African prince who takes on the mantle of King and Black Panther, and the legacy that comes with it. However, T’Challa’s mettle as ruler and hero is tested in a way that jeopardizes the fate of Wakanda and the entire world.

Wakanda Forever

Wakanda is a fictional independent African nation that is also the most technologically-developed city in the world. Wakanda has hidden its true form, cloaked by advanced technology, protecting itself and its inhabitants, thus secluding it from the rest of the world.

The country is one of the few places where Vibranium is found. The near-indestructible metal is what makes up Captain America’s shield, and possessing that precious substance supercharged Wakanda’s technological and cultural development.

According to executive producer Nate Moore on last year’s set visit, “Having a city built on Vibranium allows them to have all these advances and have wealth beyong our wildest imaginings.”

“The big thing about Wakanda is its Vibranium, which is one of the strongest metals, not the strongest, but one of the strongest and most expensive metals,” adds production designer Hannah Beachler.

The government of Wakanda is a benevolent aristocracy with a royal family that lives in Birnin Zana—the Golden City—the capital of Wakanda. King T’Chaka was murdered at the Nations in “Captain America: Civil War” by illegal arms dealer Ulysses Klaue and therefore his son, T’Challa, is now the country’s ruler.

The country is made up of five tribes. The Border Tribe is the outward face of Wakanda. While they appear to be shepherds and farmers they actually serve as the first line of defense. Like most things in Wakanda, things are not always as they seem. The River Tribe is responsible for fishing and agriculture in Wakanda. The Mining Tribe is responsible for mining minerals in Wakanda, including the precious Vibranium while the Merchant Tribe deals with trade and innovation. However, the Jabari Tribe are the outcasts. Choosing to shun the use of Vibranium, they’ve removed themselves from mainstream Wakandan life. Lead by M’Baku, he and his tribe don’t see eye-to- eye with T’Challa and the royal family and seek to return Wakanda to its isolationist ways.

 

Quite the Entourage

T’Challa (t’h-cha-lah) is the new King of Wakanda and also carries on the legacy of the Black Panther. Played by Chadwick Boseman, Black Panther is the first black super hero, debuting in the Fantastic Four #52, over fifty years ago.

T’Chaka (t’h-cha-kah), T’Challa’s father and once the ruler of the Kingdom of Wakanda, he assumed the throne and the role of Black Panther in his youth. T’Chaka was killed during a terrorist attack in the film “Captain America: Civil War.”

Nakia (nah-‘kee-ah), a Wakandan spy pulled from her mission abroad by her former flame T’Challa. Played by Lupita Nyong’o, Nakia is a war dog whose determination and worldly knowledge gives her the edge in fighting.

Okoye (oh-‘koy-yeh) is the head of the Dora Milaje—an all-female special forces group. Played by Danai Gurira, Okoye is the best fighter in Wakanda and fiercely loyal to the throne.

Shuri (‘shU-ree), T’Challa’s younger sister and head of the Wakandan Design Group, she’s a genius ahead of her time at just 16 years old. Played by Letitia Wright, Shuri designs and builds futuristic tech such as the Black Panther suit.

M’Baku (mm-‘ba-koo), the formidable leader of the Jabari tribe who have shunned the use of Vibranium and removed themselves from mainstream Wakandan life. Played by Winston Duke, M’Baku is defined by his cultural identity, and is faced with the choice of challenging T’Challa for the throne in order to return Wakanda to its isolationist ways.

W’Kabi (wuh-‘kah-bee), the head of the Border Tribe, a group that serves as Wakanda’s first line of defense against outsiders. Played by Daniel Kaluuya, the tribe is responsible for keeping any and all non-Wakandans from entering their borders.

Ramonda (rah’mon-dah), the Queen. T’Challa’s mother, Queen Ramonda, is played by Angela Bassett and is a wise counsel and confidant to her son in his new position as King of Wakanda.

Zuri (zu-ree), a Wakandan shaman, Zuri is the spiritual leader of Wakanda. Played by Forest Whitaker, Zuri is a trusted advisor to King T’Challa. He is also the keeper of the Staff of Bashenga, and tends the garden of the Heart-Shaped Herb that gives Black Panther his powers.

Dora Milaje, the cadre of strong fierce women who serve as the personal security force to the King and royal family, who act as the personal guard for the Black Panther, and are lead by Okoye.

How Much More Are You Hiding?

Wakanda has hidden and isolated itself for a reason, to protect themselves from those after the country’s precious resource, Vibranium. The substance powers most of Wakanda’s futuristic technology which is what makes it so valuable.

Those aren’t the only innovative technological components in Wakanda, Kimoyo Beads are hyper advanced communication devices. Beads are worn around the hand of a Wakandan, and are built with tech that only works inside the country. Each bead serves a purpose, the prime bead is for medical history/knowledge, the AV bead for an indispensable holographic internet, and the Communication bead, which is used similar to our modern day cell phones.

Ahead of its time in everything, even the transportation in Wakanda is revolutionary. Wakanda’s Air Force One, the Royal Talon Fighter flies alongside Talon Fighters,  Wakandan fighter jets. The Dragonflyers are the workhorse of Wakandan aircraft, used for transportation and mining, while Gyro-cruisers are gyroscopically oriented, units that work similar to a large hamster ball. Lastly, every hero needs a personal vehicle. The Panther-cycle, is not your ordinary motorbike, this motorcycle flies.

Want even more insight into the world of Wakanda and Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther”? Pick up MARVEL’S BLACK PANTHER: THE ART OF THE MOVIE out now. Go behind the scenes with exclusive concept artwork and in-depth analysis from the filmmakers in this keepsake volume! Don’t forget to check out “Black Panther” in theaters on February 16!

Wakanda Forever! Follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page for all the latest news and updates!

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Original score, composed by Ludwig Göransson, available digitally on February 16.

Marvel Music/Hollywood Records are releasing the digital album of the Black Panther score, composed by Grammy®-nominated composer and songwriter Ludwig Göransson, on February 16.

“Black Panther” marks Göransson’s third collaboration with director Ryan Coogler (“Creed,” “Fruitvale Station”).  The Swedish-born composer wrote the original songs for “Creed” and has also produced albums for Childish Gambino, Haim, and Chance the Rapper.

Göransson recorded the score in London with a 132-piece western classical orchestra, African percussionists and a 40-person choir. Göransson said, “After reading Ryan’s first draft of the script, I quickly realized that the only way I could properly score ‘Black Panther’ was to travel to Africa to record, research and learn from as many musicians I could find. I was introduced to Senegal’s most incredible musicians and storytellers, and from there it all started to come together.  One of the instruments that especially caught my attention was the talking drum, which together with West African sabar drums and ceremonial rhythms, became the foundation for the score.”

Göransson infused a wide array of African instrumentation into the score and character themes.  Speaking about the score’s creation, Göransson notes: “The talking drum is used for T’Challa’s main theme, with one hit per syllable of his name played on the drum.  For Erik Killmonger’s theme, the name was sung and screamed into a fula flute to convey the “musical interpretation of the character’s ferocity.”   Sabar drums were used to “propel the story and to highlight both the country of Wakanda and T’Challa’s movements, especially in his fight scenes.”  Sabar drums are used in traditional African wrestling “making them perfect for the action scenes.”

Göransson’s biggest challenge was to blend a western classical orchestra and modern production with traditional African rhythms and harmonies.  He adds, “Together with Ryan Coogler, we worked out new ways of combining the three elements into something traditionally authentic and truly unique, that I hope embodies the heart and soul of Wakanda.”

The “Black Panther” digital album is available for pre-order HERE.  The soundtrack can be streamed HERE .

Get your tickets now for “Black Panther” and stay tuned for even more royal action in the coming days!

“Black Panther” hits theaters February 16! While you await the King, follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page!

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Hear what it takes to be the War Dog of Wakanda.

In Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” T’Challa’s strength comes from the people he chooses to be by his side. Nakia is a War Dog, a strong-willed warrior with exceptional skills. She’s also a Wakandan spy who—unlike others—has seen life outside of Wakanda.

Played by Academy Award® winner Lupita Nyong’o, on an intimate set visit last year, she describes Nakia and the women of “Black Panther” as departures from their comic book counterparts. Nyong’o credits director Ryan Coogler and screenwriter Joe Robert Cole for deepening her understanding the role of women in Wakanda. Nakia is determined, and that played a part in taking on the physicality of the role, “It does take a lot of physical endurance and a commitment to your body. Like nothing else. But it’s been so much fun to challenge my body in this new way.”

When it comes to Nakia’s fighting style, her method is formed by a multitude of specialties: judo, jiu-jitsu, and silat. Nyong’o was pushed to take on these new techniques to form Nakia’s performance, “I’m learning all these cool skills and I get to jump higher than I thought I could jump. I get to roll backwards which I thought I would never do after the age of 8? So it’s been fun.”

Coogler is collaborative director with an athletic background himself. Nyong’o describes how he’s responsive to the actor’s needs and suggestions, “He has the mind of a fighter in a way that I really need. Because sometimes I’m like ‘I don’t know what a fighter would do?’ So to have someone who has that instinct has been very very helpful.”

“I’ve never been at the heart of an action film. So I’m fascinated with how slow it is. So slow. And so broken up. You know one moment that will go in like ten seconds you work on for half the day or something.”

Hear more from Lupita Nyong’o at Marvel Studios’ Black Panther World Premiere Red Carpet with Chadwick Boseman below:

See Lupita Nyong’o in action as Nakia when “Black Panther” opens in theaters on February 16!

Are you ready to meet the King? Follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page for all the latest news and updates!

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See it in RealD 3D at Regal Cinemas everywhere this Friday!

Wakanda Forever!

The exclusive RealD Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” poster is here! See it in RealD 3D at Regal Cinemas everywhere this Friday. Get tickets here.

Get your tickets now for “Black Panther” and stay tuned for even more royal action in the coming days!

“Black Panther” hits theaters February 16! While you await the King, follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page!

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See photos from the London premiere before it arrives in theaters on February 16!

From Wakanda, to Seoul, and now to London! Last night at the Eventim Apollo, the stars of Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, and Andy Serkis were joined by director Ryan Coogler for a walk down the red carpet where they greeted enthusiastic fans at the European premiere.

Catch a glimpse of all the glory in the gallery below.

Get your tickets now for “Black Panther” and stay tuned for even more royal action in the coming days!

“Black Panther” hits theaters February 16! While you await the King, follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page!

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A mix of traditional and futuristic elements shaped this special place in the Marvel Universe.

As crucial as the characters are to any Marvel Studios movie, the setting is a character in its own right. In Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” the setting of Wakanda defines the story and sets the tone for T’Challa’s narrative.

Last year, during Marvel.com’s visit to the set of the film, “Black Panther” producer Nate Moore and production designer Hannah Beachler discussed how they built the world of Wakanda and what influenced them to bring the impressive location to life in the Marvel Universe.

Wakanda is a futuristic country grounded in its past. Moore spoke about having the character live in a world built on different communities coming together, “What we were very afraid of was making Wakanda almost too Kirby-esque and by that I mean making it feel almost like they’re alien and not human. The truth is they’re human. They’re just 20 or 25 years ahead of us. Having a city built on Vibranium allows them to have all these advances and have wealth beyond our wildest imaginings and that’s a big part of the movie.”

The initial design of Wakanda started with the comics. Moore explains how the design was a combination of ideas, “I think there were definitely some inspiration points, especially design-wise that we got form both Chris [Priest] and Ta-Nehisi’s run. Brian Stelfreeze is an amazing artist and some of his version of Wakanda and even Wakanda technology was stuff that we borrowed pretty liberally from. But there’s also a lot of original Ryan Coogler and Hannah Beachler, who is our production designer – a lot of their ideas that are outside of publishing that we found interesting.”

For concept ideas, Beachler was looking to the future, specifically contemporary architects who had designed in Africa. Inspired by avant-garde architect Zaha Hadid—one of the most respected and celebrated architects in the world—she found her inspiration. “I started poking around and looking at really modern architects who have designed in Africa, all over Africa, east and west Africa. And someone who I really fell in love with was Zaha Hadid, who has passed away, but she is one of the foremost architects. Her architecture is very voluptuous and very flowing, very organic. And the more I started digging into Senegal and Nigeria and finding things, while not necessarily futuristic-looking, very modern in their sensibilities as far as the way they’re putting together their elements and the colors that they use, I was struck by that. I think in Kenya, Uganda—Johannesburg was another one—where no matter where you go, you really do see that they’re always keeping in mind the tradition.”

A closer look at the design elements of Wakanda and you’ll see a familiar pattern emerge, a circular pattern, “I did a lot of research into what the circular designs mean, as far as, you look at Stonehenge, you look at a lot of these old designs and they were actually based on the idea of bringing in plumbing, you know, not electric, but using water as a way to create sort of an electricity, if you will,” said Beachler. “Sort of the idea behind it was, there were always these circles and it has to do with vibration and sound, and a lot of the stuff that we’re doing is sonic and based on sound, and vibrations. Vibranium is about vibrations and soaking that vibration in.”

What separates Wakanda from other places in the Marvel Universe is the fact that while it’s the most technically-advanced civilization it has a strong history of culture as its foundation. As Moore explained, “So imagine a place that still has standing monuments that are centuries old, next to the most modern skyscrapers in the world. In the same way, they haven’t lost a lot of their cultural touchstones that other places have. They still worship, potentially the same gods they did when they first started. They still have rituals that are centuries old because they never had that sort of cultural imperialism that you’ve seen across the world. So it’s a place that really sits between being technologically advanced but also having a high value on their traditions.”

Finding the value in traditional architecture but shaping it with a futuristic slant was the running vein for creating the world of “Black Panther.” “It was important for us to keep that tradition, because we wanted to honor and have reverence for the continent,” said Beachler, “and bring it to the screen in a way that you haven’t seen before, as being a prosperous place.”

Get your tickets now for “Black Panther”, opening February 16, and stay tuned for even more royal action in the coming days!

If you’re interested in learning more about Wakandan architecture and Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” pick up MARVEL’S BLACK PANTHER: THE ART OF THE MOVIE in stores February 13. Go behind the scenes with exclusive concept artwork and in-depth analysis from the filmmakers in this keepsake volume!

While you await the King, follow @theblackpanther on Twitter and like Black Panther’s official Facebook page!

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