As we wrap up our look at T'Challa's past, the Panther teams with the Crew, the Ultimates, and more.

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen again this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther”and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

We’re wrapping up our look at Black Panther’s impressive history with this final installment, focused on 2017. So let’s jump into the notable events that occurred for T’Challa last year!

Black Panther and the Crew (2017) #3

Black Panther and the Crew (2017) #3

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Black Panther arrived in New York in BLACK PANTHER AND THE CREW #3 to address the death of activist Ezra Keith, a man who’d tried to contact him previously. In his temporary secret identity as “Luke Charles,” T’Challa joined with his former queen Storm to begin the investigation.

Luke Cage, something of a student of Keith’s, entered the picture in BLACK PANTHER AND THE CREW #4 to get answers to his questions, and the teleporter Manifold also offered his help in BLACK PANTHER AND THE CREW #5. T’Challa and his new associates clashed with the real culprits behind everything. Hydra, in BLACK PANTHER AND THE CREW #6.

Black Panther and the Crew (2017) #6

Black Panther and the Crew (2017) #6

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Panther allied himself with heroes Blue Marvel, Ms. America, Spectrum, and Captain Marvel in ULTIMATES 2 #1 to investigate strange events on the edge of the universe. In ULTIMATES 2 #2 the team ran up against the ghost of the Shaper of Worlds, Master Order, and Lord Chaos, who subsequently merged with the In-Betweener to create a new being called Logos in ULTIMATES 2 #3.

The dreaded devourer of worlds took notice of Black Panther and his team’s activities in ULTIMATES 2 #4 and on Earth, government agent Philip Vogt and his Troubleshooters began to suspect the Ultimates of shadowy operations in ULTIMATES 2 #5. Out in space, T’Challa’s compatriots discovered the Cosmic Jailer and the origins of the cosmos in ULTIMATES 2 #6.

Black Panther (2016) #9

Black Panther (2016) #9

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Back in Wakanda, the Panther and Manifold crossed the threshold of death itself to contact T’Challa’s late sister Shuri in BLACK PANTHER #8. Shuri returned to the land of the living after a learning sojourn in the hereafter in BLACK PANTHER #9, and exhibited her new powers in BLACK PANTHER #10 while her brother confronted the firebrand Changamire about a rebellion brewing in Wakanda.

T’Challa, Shuri, Manifold, and Wakandan security forces clashed with the leaders of the rebellion, Tetu and Zenzi, in BLACK PANTHER #11, and when the dust cleared after the battle, Wakanda became a republic to encompass all its people and their respective areas of the country. In BLACK PANTHER #12, the Panther sought the cooperation of the Midnight Angels, who’d previously opposed him.

Black Panther (2016) #12

Black Panther (2016) #12

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Wakandan gods seemed to no longer exist in BLACK PANTHER #13, allowing weird creatures to enter the land through mystical chaos and attack citizens. Meanwhile, a new criminal alliance between Dr. Faustus, Zenzi, Zeke Stane, and the Fenris twins sowed chaos for T’Challa in BLACK PANTHER #14, forcing the Panther to seek wisdom from his departed ancestors.

In BLACK PANTHER #15, Storm arrived in Wakanda at her ex-husband’s request, while at the same time the so-called Originators, the original Wakandan non-human denizens, returned to the land. The Black Panther invaded the exclusive Super Villain Fenris Club in BLACK PANTHER #16 to confront the criminal scientist Thunderball with the error of his wicked ways.

Black Panther (2016) #17

Black Panther (2016) #17

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Storm helped turn the tide of trouble in Wakanda in BLACK PANTHER #17, but the appearance of instigator Ras the Exhorter and a new deity caused further chaos. T’Challa convinced the Midnight Angels of the depth of his need for aid in BLACK PANTHER #18, and the Panther’s old foe Klaw made his presence known again in BLACK PANTHER #166, as the series claimed its legacy issue numbering.

Thanks for joining us for the History of Black Panther! Missed any installments? You can find them all at the links below!

The History of the Black Panther: 1966-1968

The History of the Black Panther: 1969-1970

The History of the Black Panther: 1971-1972

The History of the Black Panther: 1973-1974

The History of the Black Panther: 1975-1976

The History of the Black Panther: 1977-1978

The History of the Black Panther: 1979-1980

The History of the Black Panther: 1981-1982

The History of the Black Panther: 1983-1988

The History of the Black Panther: 1989-1990

The History of the Black Panther: 1991-1992

The History of the Black Panther: 1993-1994

The History of the Black Panther: 1995-1996

The History of the Black Panther: 1997-1998

The History of the Black Panther: 1999-2000

The History of the Black Panther: 2001-2002

The History of the Black Panther: 2003-2004

The History of the Black Panther: 2005-2006

The History of the Black Panther: 2007-2008

The History of the Black Panther: 2009-2010

The History of the Black Panther: 2011-2012

The History of the Black Panther: 2013-2014

The History of the Black Panther: 2015-2016

The History of the Black Panther: 2017

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T'Challa faces the challenges of both Secret Wars and the second Super Hero Civil War!

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen again this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther”and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

The Panther explained to all assembled in NEW AVENGERS #29 that the final incursion drew nearer and the Illuminati felt stymied to stop it. Just then, Hank Pym appeared and in NEW AVENGERS #30 related his tale of discovering a group of near-omnipotent beings called the Beyonders stood behind the incursions. Together with Black Bolt of the Inhumans, T’Challa confronted Namor in AVENGERS #41 and believed he and his villainous Cabal perished.

The Black Panther and the Illuminati began to construct a lifeboat in AVENGERS #42, a way to save individuals to rebuild after the final incursion. The Galactic Council arrived at Earth in AVENGERS #43, announcing their intention to destroy the planet and halt the incursion. T’Challa met with the President of the United States in AVENGERS #44 to tell him that the Earth would be gone in six hours.

Avengers (2012) #43

Avengers (2012) #43

  • Published: April 01, 2015
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 21, 2015
  • Rating: Rated T+
  • Writer: Jonathan Hickman
  • Cover Artist: Adam Kubert
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Reed Richards and the Panther piloted the lifeboat with their assembled braintrust aboard in SECRET WARS #1, but when they headed toward the point of collision between universes, a breach occurred that tore the craft in two. The mask of Doctor Doom appeared for a moment before them, but in an explosion of light they lost consciousness.

T’Challa awoke from stasis in SECRET WARS #3 to hear his old friend Doctor Strange explain that he and others slumbered for eight years and that Doom now ruled the world as its god-king. In SECRET WARS #4, Strange took the Panther to a battle between Doom and the Cabal, but when things turned sour, the magician teleported everyone away to save them from the god-king’s wrath.

The Panther and his old rival Namor found themselves in a land called Egyptia in SECRET WARS #5, but in SECRET WARS #6 they traveled to another area of Doom’s world to uncover a cache of powerful artifacts—including an Infinity Gauntlet—hidden from Doom by Doctor Strange.

On Doctor Doom’s artificial Battleworld, The Black Panther organized the legions of the dead in SECRET WARS #7 to go with him to fight the god-king. They arrived together in the middle of the final battle between Doom and his opponents in SECRET WARS #8, and T’Challa used an Infinity Gauntlet to attempt to take the tyrant down. Having distracted the demigod, the Panther stood back while Reed Richards confronted Doom for the last time in SECRET WARS #9.

Ultimates (2015) #1

Ultimates (2015) #1

  • Published: November 11, 2015
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: May 16, 2016
  • Rating: Rated T+
  • Writer: Al Ewing
  • Cover Artist: Kenneth Rocafort
What is Marvel Unlimited?

On the newly recreated Prime Earth, T’Challa joined with a band of heroes in ULTIMATES #1 to address larger cosmic concerns, such as the threat of the world-devourer Galactus and out-of-control time travel. After aiding the world’s champions versus a celestial destructor in CIVIL WAR II #1, the Panther learned of a new Inhuman named Ulysses who possessed the power of future-visions, and the death of Tony Stark’s dearest friend James Rhodes.

The Ultimates tried to stand between the Inhumans and Iron Man in CIVIL WAR II #2 when Tony’s rage over Rhodey’s death brought him to blows with the royal family. T’Challa aided in the tracking of Stark after he kidnapped Ulysses, but when confronting Iron Man, the young Inhuman revealed a terrifying new vision of The Hulk killing all the super heroes. Hawkeye assassinated Bruce Banner shortly thereafter, and the Panther watched the archer’s trial from Ultimates headquarters in CIVIL WAR II #3.

Tony Stark threw himself into identifying the exact nature of Ulysses’ power in CIVIL WAR II #4, while The Black Panther worked with Captain Marvel in arresting a suspect from one of the Inhuman’s visions. Stark confronted the Ultimates and Marvel with his theories, but tempers soared when he and the captain angrily disagreed on the matter. Ultimately, T’Challa stood alongside Captain Marvel, the Inhumans, and the Guardians of the Galaxy in CIVIL WAR II #5 to battle Iron Man, the Avengers, and the X-Men.

Black Panther (2016) #1

Black Panther (2016) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Back in Wakanda, unrest among the populace grew in BLACK PANTHER #1, and an anarchist named Tetu fomented insurrection. Furthermore, two of T’Challa’s loyal guard betrayed him and flew off to start their own resistance movement.

The Black Panther traveled to Wakanda’s border with Niganda in BLACK PANTHER #2 to confront Tetu’s associate Zenzi. There, he battled against her power to influence men’s minds, and withdrew when she amplified his guilt over his lost sister Shuri. In BLACK PANTHER #3, T’Challa faced off against Tetu himself, but the rebel leader escaped the monarch’s wrath.

In BLACK PANTHER #4, the Panther’s council announced the troubles as revolution, and after he consulted his mother Ramonda on what to do, a terrorist bombing raid on the capital city nearly killed the woman. Angered, T’Challa called in help from former Avenger Manifold in BLACK PANTHER #5, as well as sought advice from a collection of wily members of the world’s various intelligence leaders. Tetu enlisted Zeke Stane to help him in BLACK PANTHER #6, and together with the Fenris Twins, the villain captured the Panther during a raid on Tetu’s base. In BLACK PANTHER #7, T’Challa’s friends the Crew rescued him and helped him break through his enemy’s troops.

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Would you have what it takes to be an ally of The Black Panther?

The Black Panther has always been known for stalking his prey solo, but when he finds his back against a wall, T’Challa knows he can rely on his most trusted allies to help him prevail.

Recently, however, King T’Challa’s group of friends has fractured—just as the Black Panther’s greatest foe, Ulysses Klaw, makes his move against Wakanda. On January 24, T’Challa must reunite those he relies on most to avert total disaster as writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and artist Leonard Kirk hand the King long odds in BLACK PANTHER #169!

As The Black Panther weighs his options, we asked series Associate Editor Sarah Brunstad to give us a peek into the mind of the Wakandan king.

Marvel.com: What qualities does T’Challa look for in a friend?

Sarah Brunstad: This is a tough question to answer because T’Challa is so powerful. But, ultimately, I would say the most valuable asset for him is honesty. Both his sister Shuri and his mother Ramonda act as his advisers, not only because they’re powerful in their own right (in a very literal way for Shuri), but because they tell him truly when he’s gone astray. He can trust their wisdom.

Marvel.com: How does Shuri, in particular, aid her brother?

Sarah Brunstad: Through her connection with the Djalia—the plane of Wakandan memory—Shuri can provide the historical context that T’Challa doesn’t have.

Marvel.com: But not all of his allies hail from his homeland, right?

Sarah Brunstad: Right. When T’Challa seeks allies outside of Wakanda—like Thunderball of the Wrecking Crew—he’s still looking for integrity. For the seed of it, in Thunderball’s case. A lot of writers avoid honesty in dialogue because they think it’s harder to keep tension, but Ta-Nehisi Coates doesn’t shy away from it, and I think that creates some of the comic’s most compelling moments.

Marvel.com: Who, among the current crew of allies in BLACK PANTHER, do you believe T’Challa values the most?

Sarah Brunstad: I think it’s Shuri. She’s the only living person who has not only ruled Wakanda, but has also worn the Panther mantle. She understands the pressures around him, and why certain actions are off-limits. And frankly, she’s a bad-ass. Her transformations are pure mythic, she fights as well as T’Challa himself, and she’s a natural leader. Yet she’s also wrathful and righteous. While T’Challa nearly always stays calm and collected, Shuri shows her sleeves a little more.

Marvel.com: How do they work so well together?

Sarah Brunstad: Together, they balance the throne, even though they no longer share it. I think T’Challa is one hundred percent aware of his dependence on her. A big part of the first arc of Ta-Nehisi’s run was reuniting them and reminding us of this sibling love, which is inseparable, I think, from their mutual love of Wakanda.

Read BLACK PANTHER #169, by writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and artist Leonard Kirk, on January 24!

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No need for a white noise machine when the Master of Sound visits Marvel.com’s Resident Therapist.

Ulysses Klaue is a former human male who now exists as a being of pure sound. He still presents as, roughly, human in form, and is able to hold himself together barring any significant disruptions in concentration or attacks on his physical form. His medical records indicate he is otherwise healthy although this writer has been unable to parse exactly what that might mean.

Because of his “condition,” his voice has been altered. He remains understandable but the electric hum quality to his speech can prove difficult to listen to for extended periods of time leading to headaches and difficulty maintaining focus. The therapist is continuing to work on solutions to this situation so the client can receive his full session but currently the only workaround has been to be take a brief break around the halfway point for this writer to leave the room, take some ibuprofen, clear my head, and then return for the remaining time. While not ideal, the client has asserted he has no objection to this—beyond his existing objection to having see a therapist at all—and therefore will continue to be utilized until some other solution is found.

The client has a long history of criminality dating back to early young adulthood. According to his own disclosure and reports from others in his life, he began his criminal career seeking vengeance for his family name against the Royal Family of Wakanda. However, after that, most of his criminal activities seem predominantly motivated by greed and self-interest. That Wakanda has often been the target of those greedy and self-interested behaviors would suggest, though, that revenge remains, at the least, a subconscious motivator.

Black Panther (2016) #167

Black Panther (2016) #167

As of late, however, Klaue’s motives have become a little more difficult to discern. With the loss of his physical body and therefore a loss in the ability to experience pleasure, he has pursued activities that seem at least somewhat out of character, such as attacks on Daredevil or attempts to aid the Wizard in the claiming and controlling of an alien symbiote that, when merged with Cletus Kasady, is known as Carnage. He has declined to discuss such matters with this therapist insisting he has always acted as he wanted and these choices are merely an extension of that.

What the writer has had more luck exploring with the client is his near death experience. After being stabbed by the above mentioned Carnage, Klaue appeared to burst and dissipate. He was, however, able to stay cohesive enough to help subdue the symbiote when it appeared the alien might kill Klaue’s teammates. However, the client believed that that effort had cost him his last bit of strength and resigned himself to full dissipation.

While unclear as to how he survived or what exactly occurred between that moment and when he was able to “pull together” fully again, he is not unclear on the emotions both realizing his death was imminent and then being proven wrong evoked in him.

He endorses what sound to be like some PTSD symptoms, a sense of mental disorganization, and some halting steps towards re-evaluating current choices. He also finds himself obsessing over what it might mean for him to die, as he is purely sound, regardless of the presence of an afterlife or not. More concerning to him is the possibility that he might not be able to truly die, only dissipate and reform, ad nauseam, in ways that are largely beyond his control. The idea that not even death is something he can count on anymore have led to moments of dissociation, panic, depression, and even extreme euphoria. It also makes him feel isolated and lonely, as it represents a reminder that his humanity is something he only maintains from memory.

Black Panther (2016) #168

Black Panther (2016) #168

Unfortunately, though the client denies, another side effect of this thought seems to be the idea that if he is no longer mortal, he has no reason to hold back, no reason not to attack who he wants, when he wants, with as much bloodshed as might occur, as long as it slates whatever psychological hungers he is experiencing.

Due to this therapist’s recommendation and referral, the client will attend an appointment with Doctors Ta-Nehisi Coates and Chris Sprouse so they can evaluate him regarding his state of mortality at this time. The appointment will be December 27 and any and all information gained will be available in file BLACK PANTHER #168.

Psy D. Candidate Tim Stevens is a Staff Therapist who is also a being of pure sound, but his sound is deep, soothing, and very danceable.

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View Ulysses Klaw's change from an invader to a super-powered sound slinger!

 

Every Friday we use the powers of Marvel Unlimited to look back at the very first appearance of a major character, place or object that made waves this week.

Klaw made his diabolical return to comics with this week’s BLACK PANTHER #166. He and T’Challa have raged against each other for years, which means that he makes an excellent candidate for this week’s FLASHBACK FRIDAY!

The character debuted in a very different form back in 1966’s FANTASTIC FOUR #53 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, which also happened to be Black Panther’s second appearance. In the previous issue, T’Challa brought the Fantastic Four to Wakanda and challenged them physically. In this one, though, he revealed his true purpose for bringing them to his homeland.  

Fantastic Four (1961) #53

Fantastic Four (1961) #53

  • Published: August 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

The king showed his guests around and explained both the mantle of the Black Panther and the existence of Vibranium. In a flashback, we met Klaw who had arrived in Wakanda to mine the unique element. He needed it to power his own invention, the Sound Transformer. When T’Challa’s father refused permission, Klaw killed him.

Back in the present, Wakanda had been plagued by mysterious red creatures that left no trace when they finally fell in battle. While the Fantastic Four fought the projections, T’Challa went after the perpetrator himself. Klaw intended to kill anyone who stood between him and the Vibranium he craved. To put a stop to his enemy and avenge his father, T’Challa brought an entire mountain down on Klaw.

Instead of dying, though, the villain leaped into his own sound converter, thus turning his body into pure sound. The villain returned in a far more familiar form not long after in the pages of FANTASTIC FOUR #56. He popped up out of nowhere to trap Mr. Fantastic and Thing in Reed’s lab.  

Fantastic Four (1961) #56

Fantastic Four (1961) #56

  • Published: November 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Klaw then attacked Sue Storm and explained his new look and powers. “My physical structure is now composed of solidified sound – sound which serves me as a weapon, far greater than any ever known!”

Sue did her best to hold her own against the mad villain looking to prove himself. Meanwhile, Ben and Reed continued to try and escape from Klaw’s trap, which they eventually did! After Thing failed to drop the bad guy, Reed received a pair of Vibranium knuckles rocketed to Manhattan by T’Challa.

Properly armed, Richards knocked Klaw out with a few punches that would make Ben Grimm proud before smothering him with his own stretchy body. Having properly drained the villain of his powers, the team disabled his weaponry and then thanked Black Panther for his well-timed delivery.

Flash Forward

Klaw returned next in AVENGERS #5455 as a member of the Masters of Evil along with Whirlwind, Melter, Black Knight and Radioactive Man lead by the mysterious Crimson Cowl who turned out to be Ultron-5. The villains worked well together to take out the heroes! In the second issue, Klaw tried killing the Crimson Cowl, but failed. He then swore his allegiance. That failed to help, though, as the Avengers eventually escaped and Black Panther appropriately put Klaw down in the final battle. 

Fantastic Four (1961) #56

Fantastic Four (1961) #56

  • Published: November 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

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Peek in as artist Leonard Kirk pits T'Challa against his oldest enemy!

The Black Panther’s greatest foe has returned…and he wants war.

On October 25, Klaw makes his move in BLACK PANTHER #166! Marvel Legacy comes to Wakanda as writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and new series artist Leonard Kirk present the action. T’Challa’s problems don’t end with Ulysses Klaw, however, as the gods of Wakanda have mysteriously disappeared—and the Originators have reemerged in their place.

We chatted with Kirk about putting his own spin on these classic characters, capturing the glory of Wakanda, and giving T’Challa his kingly presence.

Marvel.com: Black Panther has a very regal quality to him—how does that influence how you draw him on the page?

Leonard Kirk: Well, it means I have to draw him very regal.

Actually, I’ve found a few ways that his bearing influences his look. Aside from action shots, I am less likely to pose Black Panther in a typical “hero manner.” I see him more stoic, reserved; very confident. Also, unlike other royal Marvel characters, like Namor or Doctor Doom, he seems less grandiose with his gestures.

Marvel.com: From a costume perspective, what did you aim to achieve as BLACK PANTHER enters the Marvel Legacy era?

Leonard Kirk: Personally, I am sticking with a lot that has been established by Brian Stellfreeze and Chris Sprouse before me. T’Challa has his traditional outfit with a few tweaks—most notably with the mask—to make him look more panther-like. I see no need to do anything else with his look. For the other characters, again, I’m sticking with what has already been established.

I haven’t had an opportunity, yet, to come up with any of my own designs—at least not for any major characters. When that does happen, I will focus on both what Ta-Nehisi wants and blend that with various African design elements. I appreciate the work done in this series to avoid stereotypes in appearance and will work my darnedest to do the same.

Marvel.com: The Originators—the former gods of Wakanda—have returned for this story in the absence of the nation’s common gods. Describe the process for realizing the Originators on the page.

Leonard Kirk: There will be one god appearing in an upcoming issue who I will rework. I’m not sure I’m allowed to say who it will be yet. In that case, I will be making the changes Ta-Nehisi is looking for. At this time, I really have no idea what I’m going to do. But I know it will be a blast.

Marvel.com: How has working with Ta-Nehisi been so far?

Leonard Kirk: Awesome! I’ve been a fan of his work both in and out of comics, so I did not hesitate one second when I got the call to draw BLACK PANTHER. He has been really great to work with. His scripts offer more than enough detail without crossing the line of being burdensome. The stories feel very well paced and he gives me the freedom to add my own touches, which always what an artist looks for. It’s heck of a lot of fun!

BLACK PANTHER #166, by writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and artist Leonard Kirk, drops on October 25!

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T’Challa’s greatest enemy makes his return in time for Marvel Legacy!

Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and artist Leonard Kirk explore King T’Challa’s long history in BLACK PANTHER #166, a Marvel Legacy title, which brings a classic Panther villain back into the Wakandan picture: Ulysses Klaw. As it turns out, many things have gone awry in the ancient African country, making it the perfect time for the iconic baddie to show up now.

“Klaw sees an opportunity,” editor Wil Moss tells us. “Wakanda is in chaos because their gods—the Orisha—have disappeared, and the gods who ruled Wakanda before the Orisha—known as the Originators—have now returned and are violently reclaiming their country.

“So while Black Panther, his sister Shuri, and Storm are struggling with this literal spiritual crisis, Klaw seizes this opportunity to get something he needs from Wakanda that will allow him to take his abilities to a new level—an almost God-like level…”

Fantastic Four (1961) #56

Fantastic Four (1961) #56

  • Published: November 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

While he made his first super-powered appearance in August of 1996’s FANTASTIC FOUR #56—the son of a Nazi war criminal who later had a sonic emitter attached to his right hand—Klaw remains a Black Panther villain through and through. This came about when the ne’er-do-well murdered T’Challa’s father, King T’Chaka, after they butted heads over Wakanda’s vibranium deposits. Naturally, the king’s son wanted revenge and a rivalry for the ages emerged.

“I think in part it’s that Klaw represents the danger, the threat that Black Panther must always protect the people of Wakanda from,” theorizes Moss. “From the first time he and T’Challa crossed paths, back when he was just Ulysses Klaue and he killed T’Challa’s father and then T’Challa in turn destroyed Klaue’s hand, beginning his transformation into Klaw, he’s represented every outside force that’s ever tried to conquer or steal from or destroy or exploit Wakanda and its resources and achievements. And if you look at him that way, then there are a ton of different ways to play him—and Ta-Nehisi has sure come up with a great one for this arc.”

Encounter Klaw on October 25 in BLACK PANTHER #166 from Ta-Nehisi Coates and Leonard Kirk!

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Recapping Manifold’s earliest exploits—fighting Norman Osborn!

Every Friday we use the powers of Marvel Unlimited to look back at the very first appearance of a major character, place, or object that made waves this week.

As Manifold jumped into the search for Ezra Keith’s killer this week in Ta-Nehisi Coates and Butch Guice’s BLACK PANTHER AND THE CREW #5, we decided to review where everything began for the mutant.

An Aboriginal Australian with teleportation powers, the man also known as Eden Fesi made his first appearance in 2009’s SECRET WARRIORS #4 by Jonathan Hickman and Stefano Caselli. The series—about a team of young heroes assembled from Nick Fury’s personal files on super powered individuals—saw Fesi join the crew in the middle of Dark Reign, as Norman Osborn accumulated an immense level of power with H.A.M.M.E.R.

Nick Fury worked in the shadows to combat this new organization by recruiting his list of super humans as well as hundreds of former S.H.I.E.L.D. agents who refused to shift allegiances to Osborn.

Fury sent Daisy Johnson and Sebastian Druid to remote Australia, where they found Eden alongside his mutant mentor—fellow teleporter, Gateway. Though Gateway initially refused Johnson and Druid’s advances, he eventually agreed to allow his protégé to join the battle against Osborn.

On Eden’s very first mission, he teleported alongside his team to a flying Hydra base where they saved Fury and a group of captive S.H.I.E.L.D. soldiers.

Eden Fesi stuck around the Secret Warriors until the series ended with issue #28. During this run, he suffered an injury that left him in a coma—though emerged stronger, with a sincere understanding for what it takes to be a super hero.

Later, writer Jonathan Hickman had Eden join the Avengers, where his reality-bending powers proved to be a vital method for his teammates and him to jump in and out of delicate and dangerous situations. During this course of events, Eden adopted the codename Manifold.

In the wake of Secret Wars, Manifold fled to the secluded nation of Wakanda in the pages of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ other book, BLACK PANTHER.

Flash Forward

Manifold once saved all of existence from the machinations of Doctor Victor von Doom.

In SECRET WARS #1, the Ultimate Universe entered a collision course with the central 616-universe. As certain heroes assembled to fight the Incursion, others attempted to save the group of super powered beings at-large.

With all of reality at stake, T’Challa connected Eden a machine that enhanced his teleportation abilities, allowing the Australian to jump across space and rescue their heroic allies from the brink. After transporting his allies to the safety of a lifeboat vessel, Manifold eschewed the safety of the ship to continue the fight. One of those lifeboats—filled with people he just saved—untethered from reality and supplied Doom’s headquarters, Doomworld, with the combined power required to reassemble the universe to its (nearly) original state. Well done Manifold!

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Writer-artist Chip Zdarsky breaks down the special variant series!

Evoking what was once a standard of comics past, a collection of How-To-Draw variant covers will be available across 20 different issues this October—including BLACK PANTHER #166, CAPTAIN MARVEL #125, ALL-NEW GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #11, DAREDEVIL #27, and GWENPOOL #21!

Via the artistic tutelage of Chip Zdarsky (writer of PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN, STAR-LORD, and HOWARD THE DUCK), readers will get a step-by-step guide to illustrating their favorite characters. How “expert” that artistic tutelage will be…is less certain.

We sat down with Chip and Editor Nick Lowe to chat about how these covers came to life.

Marvel.com: Nick, when was the first time you ever came across a how-to-draw featurette in a comic—and what did it mean to you? And then how did this project come about?

Nick Lowe: The book How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way was huge for me back in middle school and high school—and still is today. Let’s be honest: John Buscema is one of the most underrated artists in comic history. He could draw anything and you’d hear these amazing stories about him, but you see how he approached the work and it’s just stunning.

We generally do Sketch Variant covers for our big launches and when PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN came around, it hit me that we could do something a little different…especially with someone as truly bizarre as Chip, our writer. So I emailed Chip and before I knew it he sent in the hilarious How-To-Draw Spider-Man cover. [Editor-in-Chief] Axel Alonso saw it and loved it and he had the idea to roll it out into all these variants.

Marvel.com: Chip, what did you think when they approached you about this?

Chip Zdarsky: Well, like Nick says, we were gearing up for issue one of Peter Parker and, you know, launching a Spider-Man book is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, so I told Nick that I’d love to do one of the variant covers.

Marvel.com: Nick, what made Chip the go-to man for these covers? What are his strengths with this kind of work?

Nick Lowe: He’s a very troubled individual, so I knew I could exploit those troubles here. His strengths certainly aren’t art, that’s for sure, but I guess he’s pretty funny.

Marvel.com: Chip, there’s got to be more to this story. What do you remember about the Spidey editorial team’s reaction to your interest in doing a variant for the book?

Chip Zdarsky:  Never heard back. Which, you know, stung, since they had 80-90 variants for issue one. But, I forgave Nick, ‘cause he’s a really busy guy, spending most of his day telling me “no” to my story ideas. So it probably slipped his mind to tell me “no” for my variant.

Then, just before they were sending the covers to the printer, Nick contacted me. He said they were doing one of the blank sketch variants, but that I could maybe write a fun little thing on the back cover before they sent it to the printer. Was it out of pity for me? Probably. Would I exploit that pity? Yeah. Yeah, I would.

So I sent him a How-To-Draw guide for Spidey instead. It seemed to fit in with the theme of the blank covers. Nick loved it and told me I’m his favorite person at Marvel; more than Mark Waid, Dan Slott, his assistant editors Alison and Devin, etc., which was really nice to hear.

So, the Spider-Man cover came out, and people seemed to like it! I figured at that point Marvel would greenlight a How-To-Draw movie and I’d be set for life. But instead, I got a text message from Axel Alonso, Editor-in-Chief—I call those Axts—telling me that I was now drawing twenty of those covers.

Marvel.com: Nick, do you have a favorite cover?

Nick Lowe:  I love the Lockjaw one a lot. I love the DAREDEVIL one, too. But they’re all so great.

Marvel.com: Chip, do you have a personal favorite?

Chip Zdarsky: I’m pretty happy with the DAREDEVIL one, which has made its way online already. But so far my favorite is the PUNISHER one, ’cause it’s really tricky to capture the soul of a killing machine. But I think I succeeded.

Marvel.com: How long did a typical cover take you to create from beginning to end?

Chip Zdarsky: In a lot of ways, my entire life has been leading to this job, so I would say each one takes a lifetime. Or, like, half an hour. Depending on how you look at it.

Marvel.com: Nick, any chance that something like this could be expanded upon in the future?

Nick Lowe: I sure hope so! I think they’re so fun and I can’t wait for a generation of burgeoning artists to be led down the wrong path! These are the complete inversion of my beloved How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way!

Marvel.com: We’ll give the last words on these variants to the writer-artist—Chip, given a hypothetical chance to do more of these, which other characters would you love to do?

Chip Zdarsky: [Redacted], I guess.

Marvel.com: *sigh*

Keep an eye out for Chip Zdarsky’s How-To-Draw variant covers in stores this October!

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Dive deep into the history of T’Challa with artist Wilfredo Torres!

Wakanda just can’t catch a break!

In BLACK PANTHER #15—out June 28—the African nation comes to understand that its ancient gods have left them to their own devices. While King T’Challa tries to figure out what’s going on, writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and artist Wilfredo Torres continue to throw challenges his way.

Torres took over for fellow artists Brian Stelfreeze and Chris Sprouse–who will return–with issue #13 and kicked off the new storyline “Avengers of the New World.” The arc dives into all kinds of beginning-of-time mythology that the artist gets to play with and develop. We talked with him about dreaming up some of these characters, putting his own spin on existing ones, and diving into the world of Wakanda.

Marvel.com: How was it coming up with the designs for the Simbi, Anansi and Teku-Masa? Did you look to ancient images for inspiration in developing them?

Wilfredo Torres: I tried to look at species native to Africa but ultimately I tried to not go too far down the rabbit hole and instead went with more of a traditional comics, movie monster feel.

Marvel.com: Wakanda has such a unique feel and history to it. How has it been getting familiar with that world?

Wilfredo Torres: It’s a fantastic setting with all the elements you could ask for; a beautiful natural environment, a technological marvel married to tradition. It’s really a wonderful backdrop for any storyteller.

Marvel.com: Black Panther himself has such a sleek, seemingly simple design. Is it difficult putting your own spin on that costume?

Wilfredo Torres: It’s deceptively simple really but Brian Stelfreeze had such a great approach to it so I just tried to follow in that same direction.

Marvel.com: How do you feel your collaborative relationship with Ta-Nehisi has evolved since you started working together?

Wilfredo Torres: Ta-Nehisi’s scripts play out like massive cinematic scenes and they also have these wonderful personal moments which I love working on. It’s been great to collaborate with him on this as well as [colorist] Laura Martin and the entire team.

BLACK PANTHER #15 by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Wilfredo Torres arrives on June 28.

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