Black Panther: World of Wakanda was one of three Marvel finalists!

On Thursday, fans of Marvel Comics’ BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA continued to celebrate its inclusivity and impact in pop culture! As one of ten nominees for Outstanding Comic Book at the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards, the book was announced as the winning recipient of the award. Two other Marvel books, AMERICA and ICEMAN, were also nominated for their stories and contributions to inclusive representation

Here is the full list of credits including Marvel’s winner and nominees:

  • BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA, by Roxane Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Yona Harvey, Rembert BrowneAlitha E. Martinez, Manny Mederos, Joe Bennett, Afua Richardson, Roberto Poggi, Tamra Bonvillain, Rachelle Rosenberg, Virtual Calligraphy, Joe Sabino (WINNER)
  • AMERICAby Gabby Rivera, Joe Quinones, Ming Doyle, Stacey Lee, Ramon Villalobos, Walden Wong, Jen Bartel, Annie Wu, Aud Koch, Flaviano, Joe Rivera, Paolo Rivera, José Villarrubia, Jordan Gibson, Tamra Bonvillain, Brittany Peer, Rachelle Rosenberg, Travis Lanham
  • ICEMAN, by Sina Grace, Alessandro Vitti, Ibraim Roberson, Edgar Salazar, Edgar E. Tadeo, Robert Gill, Rachelle Rosenberg, Joe Sabino

To find out more about how BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA came to be created, listen to winner Roxane Gay’s 2016 appearance on Women of Marvel here!

The GLAAD Media Awards recognize and honor media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community and the issues that affect their lives. 

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Writer Rembert Browne shares the inspirations for his Black Panther tale!

Mentored by T’Challa and Erik Killmonger, Kasper Cole once spent his time striking across New York City in the name of what’s right. But time has passed, failure and frustration have taken their toll, and the man once known as The White Tiger stands by as Wakanda burns.

But on April 19, writers Rembert Browne and Ta-Nehisi Coates join artist Joe Bennett to bring Kasper Cole back to the fight in BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #6. The White Tiger returns for what may be the final encounter with his city and the world he once knew.

We caught up with Rembert to talk about super heroes and football, his collaboration with Ta-Nehisi Coates, and the real-life relevance of the world of Wakanda.

Marvel.com: I know you’re a big Atlanta Falcons fan, so if you could choose one Marvel hero to play for the team, who would it be?

Rembert Browne: The Falcons are cursed, so unfortunately there is no hero that could undo such evil. I’m still not ready to talk about this.

Marvel.com: Understood. So maybe a trade the other way: what Falcons player do you think would fit in as a Marvel hero?

Rembert Browne: Devonta Freeman as Ant-Man.

Marvel.com: What were the conversations you and Ta-Nehisi had about what you wanted to do with this issue? Was it all about narrative? Was it about a broader vision for the story?

Rembert Browne: We knew each other before I got the ask for this very out-of-the-blue, amazing opportunity. We chatted in the beginning and then he very much let me do my thing. I think he wanted me to feel like it was my project, even if I am creating this thing that exists and needs to make sense within this story he’s been telling. But yes, he’s a good man, that Ta-Nehisi Coates, very exciting up-and-coming writer.

Marvel.com: What most intrigued you about writing Kasper Cole?

Rembert Browne: There [are] few things I identify with more than feeling like you’re making a difference and still being very broke. So yes, when I saw that aspect of his bio, my recession Spidey-sense went off and I assumed I could do a half-decent job telling his story.

Marvel.com: There are few more socially relevant stories in the Marvel Universe than this one, so what excited you about writing with that in mind?

Rembert Browne: I think there’s a beautiful moment happening in art right now, stories being told that are true mixtures of the serious and the fun. Look at a show like “Atlanta,” or a movie like “Get Out.” In one moment you’re hit with the real and the next moment you’re crying laughing. It’s how real life is.

I was attracted to this story because he’s a young black man and by virtue of that reality, there will be excitement, action, disappointment, unfair treatment, pain, and redemption. Kasper’s a dude that in one day whoops ass and gets his ass whooped. To me, that’s pretty socially relevant.

Not every black story needs to be about a freedom fighter. But I also can’t imagine a story where that black person isn’t looking to be free, and doesn’t have to fight.

Also, he’s jacked, so that’s aspirational.

BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #6, by Rembert Browne, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and artist Joe Bennett, is available on April 19!

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More than The Black Panther can be found in this remarkable nation!

BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #5, out March 15, continues its closer look at the Midnight Angels, two of the nation of Wakanda’s most fascinating citizens—but they along with the famous Black Panther represent only a portion of all the incredible personages that call Wakanda home.

Here’s a few examples of the kind of characters that sprang from behind its borders.

Shuri

Shuri
First Appearance: BLACK PANTHER (2005) #2
Younger sister to T’Challa the Black Panther and once holder of that same mantle, Shuri’s come into her own as a strong leader and deadly warrior through war and other dire events. Recently back from the land of the dead, she’s forging a new heroic identity from everything she learned in life and the afterlife.

Killmonge

Erik Killmonger
First Appearance: JUNGLE ACTION #6
Perhaps the Black Panther’s greatest and most tenacious foe, Killmonger actually wanted what he believed to be the best for his native Wakanda, but his ideals and deeds to that end ran head-on with those of the nation’s true king, T’Challa. The fierce fighter’s tried more than once to conquer the country, but the Panther’s stopped him every time.

Divine

Queen Divine Justice
First Appearance: BLACK PANTHER (1998) #13
Born a Wakandan princess to the Jakari tribe, the woman who became Queen Divine Justice received schooling in America, but returned to her country when Black Panther invited hero to join the Dora Milaje, his personal guard. She soon after grew into a legendary figure in Wakanda for her activism and passion for her tribe.

Vibraxas

Vibraxas
First Appearance: FANTASTIC FOUR #391
A mutant with the power to control and shape vibrations, N’Kano earned a spot on the Wakandan-funded super hero team called Fantastic Force, as well as tutelage under The Black Panther. As Vibraxas he eventually found himself between the dreaded Man-Ape and the villain’s control over Queen Divine Justice, a situation that forced him to turn on T’Challa.

Man-Ape

Man-Ape
First Appearance: AVENGERS (1963) #62
The Wakandan warrior known as M’Baku sealed his fate by lusting after power in his native nation and opposing The Black Panther. He took on the name and mantle of the Man-Ape and became a super villain who traveled the world and joined forces with criminal teams to prove his might and stature as a near-mythical figure.

Gentle

Gentle
First Appearance: NEW X-MEN (2004) #23
Nezhno Abidemi’s mutant abilities allow him control the mass of his body to grow tall and dense. Normally a pacifist, he trained at the Xavier Institute and worked alongside the X-Men before returning to Wakanda and attempting to push the crazy life of a super hero away from him. As Gentle, he fell under the watchful eye of Storm and faced many personal challenges to his beliefs.

Learn more about the Midnight Angels in BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #5 on March 15!

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The Black Panther reaches out for help understanding the rogue Dora Milaje!

The following is a summary the two subjects, Ayo and Aneka, and their initial psychological battery for inclusion in the Dora Milaje, yearly check-ups, evaluation to stand trial, and other assorted encounters between them and our offices.

This information is being provided under protest. Despite the court order, this office believes that this data should be protected and that their initial releases no longer stand up under scrutiny given changes in their status with the government. However, given the Wakandan court ruling, we recognize we have no legal right to withhold.

The subjects, Ayo and Aneka, were ideal Dora Milaje candidates. They presented as physically healthy and in above average shape. Additionally, on intelligence testing, they demonstrated excellent recall, a strong knowledge background, and a propensity for problem solving even under pressure and time constraints.

In training, they largely adapted to situations with little to no difficulty. Neither ever was reported for errors in judgment, for exhibiting signs of distress, or for insubordination.

In reviews, both seemed dedicated to Wakanda and the ideals of their country as they saw them. They felt, as most do, that serving King T’Challa and the royal family as Dora Milaje was a tremendous honor.

Throughout their service, both did demonstrate a strong desire to help those disempowered and to represent equality for all people in the nation. They saw this as part of their job and as in keeping with traditions and beliefs of Wakanda.

In summary, prior to the occurrence of Aneka’s “crime,” both individuals were very committed to their roles and very psychologically healthy.

After the trial and death sentence, however, both experienced a tremendous sense of disillusionment. Both felt betrayed by the institution they belonged to and the country they fought for. They saw themselves as being “right” regarding what were the values of the country and that it was the leadership that had become wrong.

They are not, however, mentally ill. Their reaction, while arguably extreme, has not abandoned logic and does not seem to suggest the subjects can no longer understand the difference between right and wrong. They have become radicalized, it is true, but these reactions are not a sign of a disconnect from reality. The only arguable diagnosis this writer can put forward is Acute Stress Disorder in reaction to the trauma of their way of life, their belief in a system, being dashed.

This writer would refer the crown to Doctors Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxane Gay, and Alitha Martinez for further information as they have had far more session time with Ayo and Aneka and our experts on the history, values, and day to day life of the Dora Milaje. Their latest volume on the subject, BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #4, will be available for scholarly review on February 15.

Psy D. Candidate Tim Stevens is an Outpatient Therapist who has quelled a rebellion or two in his time. But that’s classified.

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