Captain America and The Falcon take a wild ride to different dimension!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

In the 1960s, Jack Kirby worked with Stan Lee to start building up the Marvel Universe. Many fans rightfully think of that era as truly magical, a fount of creative energy focused on the task of making heroes and villains that would stand the test of time. But it’s also important to look at the 70s work of “The King,” when he wrote, drew and edited a batch of books that included DEVIL DINOSAUR, MACHINE MAN, and BLACK PANTHER as well as his return to the character and title he launched, CAPTAIN AMERICA.

Kirby kicked his latter day run on Cap’s book with an epic story called “Madbomb,” a tale filled with many of the hallmarks of his work from the krackle to the positive social message. Seemingly hard to top, he tried with the story starting in CAPTAIN AMERICA #201, which pits Steve Rogers and his partner Falcon against a mysterious group called the Night People of Zero Street!

The Night People not only wanted to recruit Cap as their own hero, but also launched a crime wave that hit everything from grocers and jewelers to pet and costume stores! They even swiped projectors from late night movie houses! After talking to one of the Madbomb makers, Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson thought they’d have a chance to relax, but then heard about the mysterious new group from Sam’s girlfriend Leila right before those very same denizens of Zero Street kidnapped her in an effort to bring Falcon and Cap to them!

Captain America (1968) #201

Captain America (1968) #201

  • Published: September 10, 1976
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 17, 2008
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Falcon flew off in a hurry, but accidentally hit an oncoming plane flown by Texas Jack Mudloon, a wealthy adventurer. After thanking Jack, Falcon flew off again, this time right into the portal to Zero Street! On the other side, the Night People grabbed him, put Falcon and Leila on trial, and then gave them shock treatment.

Back on Earth, Captain America heard about Falcon vanishing and got to work finding him in issue #202 which led the Star-Spangled Avenger to also meet Muldoon. While they figured out how to find Wilson, Sam himself—now brainwashed—moved to fight a huge, craggy, fire-breathing monster on behalf of the Night People. At the same time, Cap waited for another portal to Zero Street to open up so he could leap into action. Unbeknownst to him, Texas Jack followed him through as well!

In #203, Cap and Jack learned that an Earthly asylum had been transported to another dimension years ago, creating Zero Street and the Night People by extension. More surprises came when Rogers ran into Leila and Falcon, neither of whom recognized him! The local leaders offered the new arrivals the choice of either death or a change like the one Sam and Leila went through. While they thought on that, a small army of monsters like the one Falcon previously fought attacked. Cap got the information and equipment he needed and used a portal to Earth to get everyone to safety before blowing the machinery up, leaving Zero Street to the invaders.

As he tended to do when left to his own devices, Kirby not only offered up a super-fun super hero story with cowboys and monsters and alternate dimensions, but also social commentary on African Americans’ treatment in the justice system and also the status of those who had been institutionalized.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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Captain America takes on Batroc, Swordsman, and Living Laser!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

Jack Kirby’s impressive battle scenes proved so captivating that he and writer Stan Lee would integrate them into comics even when they didn’t necessarily need to be there! Take CAPTAIN AMERICA #105 for example: it started with a one page splash of Cap, Bucky, and the Army rushing towards a Nazi contingent in the foreground before giving way to a gorgeous two-page spread of all the patriotic heroes smashing through the German line! The comic itself even told us that these images essentially existed because Kirby excelled in that arena. “We’ll admit this doesn’t have much to do with the stirring saga that follows, but we just couldn’t resist giving Jolly Jack a chance to let himself go on this sizzling scene…and we kinda suspect that no True Believer amongst you is gonna complain!”

By the next page we discovered that these snapshots of action existed in a presentation of combat films being shown to Steve Rogers in an effort to get him to narrate the project for TV. Instead of exciting the Avenger, though, these glimpses of his partner in patriotism simply reminded him that Bucky Barnes did not make it out of World War II alive. Rogers walked right out of the meeting without giving an answer to narration job. Instead, he thought about getting himself out of love interest Sharon Carter’s life for fear it would bring danger or even death to her. Instead, he chose to rush right into danger.

At that very moment, Batroc the Leaper met with his new partners in crime Swordsman and Living Laser to steal a Seismo-Bomb from a spy before the U.S. government could get their hands on it. Somebody must have heard Cap’s wishes, because we then cut to him getting a mission briefing about the same weapon. S.H.I.E.L.D. had gotten the man who brought it into the country, but he died before they could find the device itself.

Captain America (1968) #105

Captain America (1968) #105

  • Published: September 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Moments after leaping into action to find the potentially city-destroying explosive, the Shield-Slinger saw the trio of enemies also hunting for the same object. We then got treated to a multi-page Kirby-drawn fight between Cap and Swordsman while the other two continued looking for the Seismo-Bomb. Though the villain’s weapon featured far more tricks and surprises, Cap relied on his fists to take his opponent out! Next, the Avenger went up against the Living Laser and his chaotic energy blasts. Once again, Rogers used his honed skills as a hand-to-hand combatant and master tactician to disable LL’s weapons and get the information he needed to stop Batroc.

All of that led to a thrilling battle between two of the best fighters in the Marvel Universe as Manhattan’s fate stood in the balance. However, when Cap explained the potential devastation—and impending death—that would result from the Seismo-Bomb detonated, Batroc ran off leaving our hero to dismantle the device just in time!

This issue stands as a shining example not only of the battlefield scenes mentioned above, but Kirby’s absolute expertise in presenting action and super fights in a way that’s clear, concise, and packed with danger. In other words: this issue offers plenty of evidence as to why Kirby will always be King!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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The King's Silver Age Marvel work comes to a close with a milestone for the Fantastic Four and more.

In celebration of Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday, we’re reviewing the man’s legendary creations with a year-by-year examination of his unparalleled career at Marvel Comics. Read on and witness the work that made him comic book royalty.

The year 1969 became a turning point in the career of Jack Kirby as the legendary artist began what would be his final Marvel projects during the Silver Age of Comics.

Jack wound down his output even more in the last year of the Swingin’ Sixties, passing CAPTAIN AMERICA off to newer artists like Barry Windsor Smith and concentrating on his landmarks, FANTASTIC FOUR and THOR. With Stan Lee, Jack dove into an appearance by the mysterious Inhumans in FANTASTIC FOUR #82, as well as a new Doctor Doom saga that began in FANTASTIC FOUR #84. Later in the year, he and Lee created a planet of Skrulls who’d adopted an early-20th century gangster lifestyle in FANTASTIC FOUR #92, which led to the Thing battling a fantastic new Kirby creation, the robot Torgo, in FANTASTIC FOUR #93.

In CAPTAIN AMERICA #109, jack provided a big send-off for the Sentinel of Liberty with a retelling of his origin, then returned for a single story of super heroes’ remembrances of Cap in CAPTAIN AMERICA #112.

Captain America (1968) #109

Captain America (1968) #109

  • Published: January 10, 1969
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

One Jack greatest co-creation, Galactus, returned in THOR #160 to bedevil the Thunder God as well as another Kirby stand-out character, Ego the Living Planet. Later, in THOR #165, Thor battle Him before Galactus returned once more to stomp his way through the rest of the year.

As 1970 dawned, Jack made plans to leave Marvel. He’d already logged artwork for upcoming issues of his books and finished more in the first few months of the year. This provided Marvel and its fans a few more chances to see “The King” on their favorite characters before his departure.

Fantastic Four (1961) #100

Fantastic Four (1961) #100

  • Published: July 10, 1970
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Jack had drawn many a spooky witch in his early days on monster and horror anthologies, but perhaps his superlative success with the them came in the form of Agatha Harkness, introduced in FANTASTIC FOUR #94. A few issues later, Stan and Jack celebrated one-hundred installments of “The World’s Greatest Comic Magazine” in FANTASTIC FOUR #100, and then followed that up with a clash between the FF and Namor the Sub-Mariner with his new ally Magneto.

Over in THOR, Jack surrounded the Thunder God with the flames of Surtur in THOR #176, and then ended his run on the book with the incredible cover of Thor in all his glory on THOR #177.

Thor (1966) #177

Thor (1966) #177

  • Published: June 10, 1970
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: June 24, 2011
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

One fascinating footnote of Jack’s last days at Marvel arrived in the form of a new anthology Stan called AMAZING ADVENTURES. In the first four issues, Jack not only drew an amazing solo adventure of his Inhumans, but also scripted it, too. This rare combination of writing and art put a singular capstone on Jack Kirby last collaborations with Marvel in the 1960s. From there, he made his way to DC, but by no means did he shut the door on ol’ Marvel for good…

Amazing Adventures (1970) #1

Amazing Adventures (1970) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?
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Cap gets his own title, while the FF battle a bevy of heroes and much more!

In celebration of Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday, we’re reviewing the man’s legendary creations with a year-by-year examination of his unparalleled career at Marvel Comics. Read on and witness the work that made him comic book royalty.

Superstar artist Jack Kirby continued to focus on only a few books in 1968, but one character of his in particular received even more attention from “The King” that year. In all, 1968 would prove to be another standout time for Kirby designs.

Over in FANTASTIC FOUR #70, Jack played around with the look of Sue Richards’ costume, adding a kind of skirt motif to it. It didn’t last long overall, but one Kirby creation that seemed poised to launch even higher into the stratosphere of popularity called himself the Silver Surfer, and he returned in FANTASTIC FOUR #72.

Jack also got to draw some of the other Marvel stars in guest-shot appearances in FANTASTIC FOUR #73, aided writer-editor Stan Lee in Galactus’ latest mischief-making in FANTASTIC FOUR #74 and #75, and played around again with the Thing’s wish to change back to plain ol’ Ben Grimm permanently in FANTASTIC FOUR #78.

Perhaps the biggest news that year for FF fans arrived in Lee and Kirby’s FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #6 blockbuster. In it, Jack unleashed the spooky Annihilus, a weird insect-like tyrant who ruled over the Negative Zone and stood in the team’s way of securing a cure for Sue’s condition. What condition might that’ve been? None other than dangerous amounts of radiation in her body endangering the birth of her first child, Franklin Richards. Stan and Jack saw her through, though, and the old Kirby artistic touch seemed right at home at delineating babies.

To increase the tall tales inn the fabled halls of Asgard, Jack added the powerful, cosmic crowbar-wielding Wrecker to THOR #148, and designed a cool new monster, Mangog, for the Thunder God to lay the hammer down upon in THOR #154.

Jack’s World War II super hero soldier received his own title in 1968 when Lee converted his 11-page adventures in TALES OF SUSPENSE into a glorious 20-page Kirby extravaganza aptly named CAPTAIN AMERICA. Cap hit the ground running and jumping in CAPTAIN AMERICA #100 and enjoying the company of Stan and Jack’s Black Panther for a clash with the masked Baron Zemo. The Red Skull dropped in for another bout with his arch-nemesis in CAPTAIN AMERICA #101, and Jack whipped up a creepy headshrinker in the form of Doctor Faustus in CAPTAIN AMERICA #107.

The remainder of Jack’s free-time—ha ha—in 1968 rounded out with his usual layout service for other books, and also his incredible control over covers. Two such knock-outs that year must be the Daredevil-Captain America boxing match from DAREDEVIL #43, and the high-flying new cover for TALES OF ASGARD #1, which reprinted Stan and Jack’s back-up feature from THOR.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more on Jack Kirby and join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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Jack and Stan Lee pit Captain America against The Red Skull once again!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

In 1968, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby broke the Sentinel of Liberty out of TALES OF SUSPENSE and finally gave him back a solo book starting with CAPTAIN AMERICA #100. That first issue wrapped up a story that had begun in the previous book, but #101 launched the series’ first multi-part adventure, which revolved around Cap tracking down Nazis like Werner von Krimm, otherwise known as the Butcher of Lichtengarten, and punching their faces in! To the shield slinger’s shock, Nick Fury popped up during the fracas and helped the Nazi leave the scene. The head of S.H.I.E.L.D., of course, had a plan: he’d placed a tracer on Von Klimm and sent him on his way so that they could figure out who he really worked for.

The big boss turned out to be none other than The Red Skull, who needed Von Klimm to deliver the key that would help him awaken The Fourth Sleeper. Back in TALES OF SUSPENSE #7274, we saw that the crimson war criminal had hidden three other such machines, but hoped this one would prove more successful than the previous trio.

After explaining how he escaped his apparent death in the pages of TALES OF SUSPENSE #91, Red Skull had to wait for Von Klimm to arrive. He didn’t realize that Cap followed the villain in an experimental flying saucer provided by Fury. Soon shot down, the Avenger jumped right into action, but the Skull’s agents got the drop on him.

Captain America (1968) #101

Captain America (1968) #101

  • Published: May 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Red Skull held the Soni-Crystal, which responded to his mind, as the guards brought their captive into the stronghold. Chaos erupted as The Fourth Sleeper awoke and immediately displayed its ability to control its own density. Cap took advantage to escape his immediate captors and then learned from the Skull that this Sleeper had the added ability to explode, potentially taking the world with it! As the first issue ended, the Sleeper exhibited its massive power by first blowing up the Skull’s secret base and then sending explosions up the coast. Though it seemed like he couldn’t have possibly survived, Rogers came out with both his life and the key!

In CAPTAIN AMERICA #102, our hero reunited with Nick Fury and got outfitted to take on the Sleeper. In addition to taking out a gang of assassins who tried ambushing him right after he left his S.H.I.E.L.D. briefing, Cap also reunited with Agent Carter who now found herself tasked with helping him on his mission. Meanwhile, Red Skull revealed that he also had an army of followers called Exiles who had been training on an island since the end of World War II. He used these agents to try and stop Cap and Agent 13 from halting the engine of destruction, but the duo bested them.

Finally, as The Fourth Sleeper appeared out of nowhere thanks to its atomic control of itself, Cap handed the key to Carter and threw himself in the robotic creature’s path. Carter’s intense feelings for Rogers filtered through the key and wound up completely dissipating it! Ultimately, this story filled with classic Kirby and Lee storytelling and visuals ended on a positive note thanks to their belief that love could conquer mindless evil, even the kind that threatened the very existence of the planet!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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A trio of takes on the Sentinel of Liberty from his co-creator!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us this month to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

During Jack Kirby’s decades-long career he certainly created a number of memorable characters, but none can match Captain America when it comes to longevity. Along with his partner Joe Simon and the talented artists who worked for them, Kirby delivered CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS #1 to Timely Comics in 1941 and continued working on the series through issue #10. During that time, Kirby not only drew Steve Rogers’ origin as the Army reject who wound up becoming the symbol of all things American when given the Super Soldier Serum, he additionally introduced the likes of Bucky and The Red Skull.

As later established in AVENGERS #4, Bucky died thanks to a plot by Baron Zemo that also left Cap floating through the ocean in a block of ice. He remained there until 1965 when Kirby teamed up with Stan Lee—who also contributed to CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS—to reintroduce the Sentinel of Liberty to a new generation of readers! The thawed out Super Soldier quickly became a stalwart member of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes.

After bringing Steve Rogers back, Lee and Kirby decided to tell even more Cap stories, this time in the pages of TALES OF SUSPENSE, starting with #58. While some of these adventures took place in the present, others drew on some of that raw material from the first run of Cap comics and retold them for a new audience, complete with new art that showed off how Kirby’s work had evolved in that time.

TALES OF SUSPENSE gave way to CAPTAIN AMERICA #100 in 1968. Between the two books, Kirby helped introduce characters like Batroc, Doctor Faustus, Sharon Carter, The Falcon, Peggy Carter, M.O.D.O.K., and more. Kirby drew the series through issue #109, and then returned for #112, which he reportedly drew in 24 hours.

In the mid-70s, “The King” returned to the castle he helped build and did one more stint with his bravest of knights: Captain America. Kirby took over as writer-artist-editor of the title with 1976’s #193. Without missing a beat, he launched the Avenger and his partner Falcon directly into classic adventures like “Madbomb,” which dealt with the dangers of weaponized hate.

During this time, Kirby created one of Erik Larsen’s favorite moments during “The Swine,” not to mention the still-relevant Arnim Zola. Ultimately, the King’s reign on CAPTAIN AMERICA would come to a close with 1977’s issue #214, leaving behind not one or two, but three legendary runs on the character!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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The sentient Cosmic Cube begins to understand her role in Secret Empire.

Each week, we use our super sleuth skills to dig into the histories of the characters fighting on both sides of Secret Empire!

It all started with a Cosmic Cube who believed it was a person. That’s the basic truth behind the events of Secret Empire, though far from the full story.

Kobik’s origins reach back to her first mention in MARVEL NOW! POINT ONE #1, though readers didn’t get a full look at her until AVENGERS STANDOFF: WELCOME TO PLEASANT HILL #1. In that crossover, we learned that Maria Hill put a plan into place that would use parts of a Cosmic Cube to re-write villains’ memories so that they would fit in nice and happy in a small town dubbed Pleasant Hill. 

Avengers Standoff: Welcome to Pleasant Hill (2016) #1

Avengers Standoff: Welcome to Pleasant Hill (2016) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

In AVENGERS STANDOFF ASSAULT ON PLEASANT HILL ALPHA #1, Kobik’s origins were revealed. Initially, S.H.I.E.L.D. intended to use pieces of a smashed Cube to make their jail a reality, but the chunks joined together to create a kid named Kobik. That, of course, didn’t stop Hill and company from using her to achieve their goal anyway.

The Cosmic Cube prison idea started making the rounds in public early on in CAPTAIN AMERICA: SAM WILSON, though it took Rich Jones’ work as the super-hacker Whisperer to get the word out Pleasant Hill. Jones actions lead to heroes like Wilson, Steve Rogers, Bucky Barnes and eventually the rest of the Avengers to make a move on the prison as Baron Zemo and other baddies started regaining their memories.

During the conflagration, the then-old Steve Rogers found himself returned to his more youthful status thanks to a run-in with Crossbones that lead to him needing some healing from Kobik.

What no one knew at that time was that Red Skull had been influencing Kobik from the beginning. Upon gaining sentience, she desired to meet someone who loved her and no one loved their old Cosmic Cube like the Skull. Through their interactions, the Hydra leader indoctrinated the young woman in his ways of hate, even teaching her completely false news-laced history.

Even worse, Skull essentially programmed Kobik to not just rejuvenate Steve Rogers, but implant a series of false memories that lead to his “Hail Hydra” shocker in CAPTAIN AMERICA: STEVE ROGERS #1 and everything that lead up through this week’s SECRET EMPIRE #9

Captain America: Steve Rogers (2016) #1

Captain America: Steve Rogers (2016) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

After Standoff, Kobik spent time with Bucky Barnes in the Thunderbolts as well as some of the former villain pals she made in Pleasant Hill. She even went so far as to attempt to rewrite Bucky’s past to make him a Hydra agent, but he rebuked the very notion. When Bucky attempted to explain the reality of Hydra to Kobik, she flipped her wig and nearly destroyed everything in existence until Fixer blasted her, shattering her into the Cosmic Cube fragments.

The heroes have been looking for these pieces since Secret Empire began, but as we learned this week, Hydra attained all but one which lead to the souped-up version of Rogers seen at the end of the issue.

However, a glimmer of hope exists within Kobik herself. Another reveal in #9 came when Steve Rogers realized that he had been existing in a kind of ghost world inside her mind. Having regained much of himself, he seemed ready to jump back into the battle, assuming he could get his hands on a body, of course!

The Empire Strikes Back

If you’re wondering which of the many Cosmic Cubes used by Red Skull resulted in Kobik’s strange relationship with the madman, look no further than Mark Waid’s run on CAPTAIN AMERICA with Ron Garney which ran from CAPTAIN AMERICA #444448. Though presumed dead thanks to the Super Soldier Serum turning on him, Rogers soon woke up to the sight of the long-thought-dead Sharon Carter and the Red Skull. All three had to team up to save their own skins – reality itself – from a Hitler-infused Cosmic Cube. Upon succeeding in that task, the Skull gained control of the Cube itself and did some of his own historical re-writing, but Rogers broke free and used his shield to shatter the Cosmic Cube, slice off the Skull’s arm and blowing everything up. That seemed the end of that particular Cube until Red Skull revealed the true history in CAPTAIN AMERICA: STEVE ROGERS #2

Captain America (1968) #444

Captain America (1968) #444

What is Marvel Unlimited?

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Erik Larsen illuminates Jack Kirby's ability to wrench hearts with a Captain America classic!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us this month to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

“Picking a favorite issue is pretty much impossible. Jack did everything so well, it’s hard to pick a favorite.”

Erik Larsen sums up how many feel about the King’s work. Between his early days on CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS to his Silver Age co-construction of the Marvel Universe as we know it, Jack Kirby had a hand in releasing some of the most popular characters in all of pop culture. In other words, it’s no small task to pick just one story to talk about.

“If I was to pick a favorite scene by Jack as a writer at Marvel—it’d have to be the sequence in CAPTAIN AMERICA [#206] where The Swine fed a starving prisoner at his table,” Larsen explains. “Absolutely devastating. Powerful stuff, both story and art.”

This particular tale came from Kirby’s last stint on the character, during a time when he wrote and illustrated each issue. At the time, Steve Rogers shared the title with Sam Wilson, aka The Falcon—another Kirby co-creation. Issue #206 saw the creator shifting locations to a Central American jungle nation called Rio de Muerte, where a ruthless commander named Hector Santiago—dubbed “The Swine”—used prisoners for slave labor.

“The scenes with The Swine were just powerful and impactful,” Larsen recalls. “You felt the pain. You felt the prisoners’ plight. Yeah, the fights were explosive and the characters were great—there’s so much there—but Jack was able to tear out your heart. I think fans tend to overlook what a terrific writer Jack could be.”

Captain America (1968) #206

Captain America (1968) #206

  • Published: February 10, 1977
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Thanks to a botched kidnapping and ensuing plane crash, Steve Rogers wound up in close proximity to Rio de Muerte. After the Swine’s stooges found and attacked him, Santiago tried to shoot Cap, but ultimately stood no match for Steve’s ingenuity—and shield.

Intending to escape and get out of the jungle, The Sentinel of Liberty had a realization when he saw Santiago’s captives. Alongside Cap, readers witnessed the gruesome torture that The Swine put his prisoners through in attempts to make them divulge military secrets.

In issue #208, Steve fought off a Man-Fish monster before being trapped by the Swine’s goons. Intending to torture Cap with a flamethrower, Santiago soon found himself betrayed by his own cousin Donna Maria. Tossing her into the torture chamber with Rogers, Hector looked to set them both on fire, when the creature returned and made short work of the villain. In short, one of the worst bad guys around got what he deserved in classic Kirby fashion.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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Steve Rogers hasn’t always been a paragon of virtue—take a look back!

With CAPTAIN AMERICA: STEVE ROGERS #17 cutting just a little deeper into our hearts on May 24, we’re taking a trip down memory lane with some of the Star-Spangled Avenger’s less heroic moments. It will be hard to compare to the sheer cringeworthy-ness of Secret Empire, what with the general taking over the world because you’re a Hydra sleeper agent vibes, but we’ll try.

Civil War (2006) #1

Civil War (2006) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?
Let’s just say it first because you were all thinking it anyway: Civil War. Some of you may have been Team Cap and others Team Iron Man, but whatever your allegiance I think we can all admit that Cap maybe should have just swallowed his pride, sat down with Tony and worked that baggage out—or as the Internet likes to call it, #adulting—instead of passive aggressively forming a secret alliance to try and overthrow everyone at the expense of fellow heroes, civilians and a lot of what I can only imagine to be really expensive buildings and machinery. I’m sure construction companies made a killing afterward but that’s beside the point.

Captain America (1968) #165

Captain America (1968) #165

What is Marvel Unlimited?
On the opposite end of the spectrum we have CAPTAIN AMERICA #165 where we find out our handsome hero dating two women at the same time. Oh, and they’re related! The horror, the scandal, the indecency! It’s actually not as bad as it sounds; Peggy Carter gets amnesia and forgets that she and Cap broke up but he’s already dating her young great-niece Sharon. He doesn’t want to hurt Peggy, so when faced with having to break her heart he decided to date them both.

Captain America (1968) #372

Captain America (1968) #372

  • Published: July 10, 1990
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: July 29, 2013
  • Cover Artist: Ron Lim
What is Marvel Unlimited?
Somewhere in the middle of mass destruction and a sitcom plot, we have a 1990s arc, “Streets of Poison, running through CAPTAIN AMERICA #372378, where Captain America has a brief existential crisis regarding his use of the Super Soldier Serum, ending in him aiding the war on drugs. As his first strike, Steve blows up a facility making “ICE.” But the drugs fuse with his super soldier blood thus beginning the seven-issue bender of Steve Rogers where he beats up Daredevil, kisses Diamondback, calls a guy at a club a chicken—clucking sounds and all—and even—gasp!—eats Kingpin’s spaghetti! A truly masterful play that I’m sure is really a long con we just haven’t seen pay off yet.

How much worse can things get? Find out May 24 in CAPTAIN AMERICA: STEVE ROGERS #17 written by Nick Spencer with art by Andres Guinaldo.

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The Avengers, Excalibur, Deathlok, Captain America and more cross the Panther's path!

For 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. As we count down to a vision of T’Challa on the big screen coming soon, take a look back at five decades’ worth of comic book adventures…

The Black Panther clashed with the Coal Tiger, his exact duplicate from another reality, in AVENGERS #356, part of an ongoing struggle between Earth’s Mightiest Heroes and their new foes, the alternate-Earth-hopping Gatherers.

Not long after, T’Challa played host to a small contingent of Avengers and Excalibur members to discuss toxic waste disposal in EXCALIBUR #59. The gathering brought forth the menace of Icon, a bio-chemist with the ability to transmute his body into wood, in EXCALIBUR #60.

Captain America (1968) #415

Captain America (1968) #415

What is Marvel Unlimited?

After aiding the Fantastic Four in another dust-up with his old enemy Klaw in FANTASTIC FOUR UNLIMITED #1, the Panther hired the cyborg Deathlok to provide cyber-security for Wakanda in DEATHLOK #22. Moses Magnum sent his agent Phreak and others to invade the small country, but when that attack fell apart, he dispatched Killjoy to assassinate T’Challa in DEATHLOK #23. The cyber warrior blocked Killjoy’s assignment in DEATHLOK #24, and joined forces with the Panther in DEATHLOK #25 to bring down Magnum once and for all.

When the Panther welcomed friend Captain America to Wakanda in CAPTAIN AMERICA #414, he opened the nation up to an invasion by the Dinosaur-Men. During the fracas, he also discovered illegal vibranium mining and fought Ka-Zar in CAPTAIN AMERICA #415, as well as fell into the middle of a war between the High Technician and A.I.M. in CAPTAIN AMERICA #416, and held back the onslaught of A.I.M.’s use of the giant Terminus’ corpse as an attack vehicle in CAPTAIN AMERICA #417.

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