Excalibur, Deathlok, Captain America and more cross the Panther's path, as he helps form a new team!

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen again this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

The gathering of Excalibur and Avengers team members the Black Panther took part in brought forth the menace of Icon, a bio-chemist with the ability to transmute his body into wood, in EXCALIBUR #60.

When the Panther welcomed his friend Captain America to Wakanda in CAPTAIN AMERICA #414, he opened the nation up to an invasion by the Dinosaur-Men. During the fracas, he also discovered illegal vibranium mining and fought Ka-Zar in CAPTAIN AMERICA #415, as well as fell into the middle of a war between the High Technician and A.I.M. in CAPTAIN AMERICA #416, and held back the onslaught of A.I.M.’s use of the giant Terminus’ corpse as an attack vehicle in CAPTAIN AMERICA #417.

Captain America (1968) #414

Captain America (1968) #414

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After aiding the Fantastic Four in another dust-up with his old enemy Klaw in FANTASTIC FOUR UNLIMITED #1, the Panther hired the cyborg Deathlok to provide cyber-security for Wakanda in DEATHLOK #22. Moses Magnum sent his agent Phreak and others to invade the small country, but when that attack fell apart, he dispatched Killjoy to assassinate T’Challa in DEATHLOK #23. The cyber warrior blocked Killjoy’s assignment in DEATHLOK #24, and joined forces with the Panther in DEATHLOK #25 to bring down Magnum once and for all. T’Challa then teamed with the immortal Black Axe and fellow African hero Afrikaa in the Marvel UK title BLACK AXE #5, #6, and #7 against Jonathan Cardinal and his Cardinal’s Guard.

After unwittingly participating in a S.H.I.E.L.D. Life Model Decoy test in MARVEL COMICS PRESENTS #148, T’Challa loaned his longtime ally Sue Storm much needed money for use by her team in FANTASTIC FOUR #385. The Panther would then find his own request for assistance with a young, superpower Wakandan called Vibraxis rebuffed by an upset Human Torch in FANTASTIC FOUR #390, and as a result traveled to see the Inhumans in FANTASTIC FOUR #391. Now joined by both Vibraxis and the Inuuman Devlor, the Panther was present for the first meeting between those two, the Warrior-Princess Huntara, and a teenage version of Franklin Richards called Psi-Lord in FANTASTIC FOUR #392. The Black Panther then brought these four young heroes together to form a new team in FANTASTIC FORCE #1 and the group acquitted themselves well against the Panther’s longtime foe, Klaw, in their first outing.

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T’Challa aids the Avengers and Daredevil and goes solo to take on Killmonger and Venomm!

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen again this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

Captured by the Space Phantom and his temporary ally the Grim Reaper in AVENGERS #107, the Black Panther witnessed the two villains’ temptation of the Vision and their plans to secure a new body for the android. After being freed by Captain America in AVENGERS #108, T’Challa and his teammates welcomed help from the cosmic Captain Marvel to defeat the Phantom and the Reaper as well as the hordes of Hydra.

Following that adventure, the Panther faced off against the gigantic Imus Champion in AVENGERS #109 and received Hawkeye’s resignation from the team. When the team rallied again to aid the X-Men in their battle with Magneto in AVENGERS #110, T’Challa found himself buried under rocks by the mutant villain, prompting a scouting mission in DAREDEVIL #99 to secure assistance for another fight.

Avengers (1963) #112

Avengers (1963) #112

What is Marvel Unlimited?

With Daredevil and the Black Widow at their side, the Black Panther and the Avengers finally put down Magneto’s latest scheme in AVENGERS #111, and welcomed the Widow into their ranks. Her tenure lasted briefly, though, for she left following T’Challa’s harrowing confrontation with the Lion God in AVENGERS #112.

The Panther served masterfully in helping his teammates operate on a wounded Vision in AVENGERS #113, and in another bout with the Lion God in AVENGERS #114. In AVENGERS #115 he secured a surrender from the dreaded Troglodytes and in AVENGERS #116 discovered the presence of the mystical Evil Eye in the mystery of the Black Knight’s disappearance. T’Challa found himself pitted against Doctor Strange during the search for the Evil Eye in DEFENDERS #9, and rejoined with his teammates to witness the final moments of a Thor-Hulk clash in DEFENDERS #10.

After the so-called Avengers-Defenders War wrapped up with a big battle involving both teams as well as Loki and Dormammu in AVENGERS #118, the Black Panther returned to his native Wakanda in JUNGLE ACTION #6 to meet the revolutionary called Erik Killmonger and suffer defeat at his hands. Later, in JUNGLE ACTION #7, T’Challa looked into an illegal vibranium mine to gain a new foe known as Venomm.

Jungle Action (1972) #7

Jungle Action (1972) #7

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Black Panther welcomed Captain America’s partner The Falcon to Wakanda in CAPTAIN AMERICA #169, and by CAPTAIN AMERICA #171 provided the hero with a high-tech rig to grant him the power of flight. Later, T’Challa stopped a new menace known as Malice from invading the royal palace to free the Panther’s prisoner, Venomm, in JUNGLE ACTION #8.

Erik Killmonger directed Baron Macabre to send his undead against the Black Panther JUNGLE ACTION #9, while T’Challa’s friend Monica stood accused of murder. Macabre joined forces with Kind Cadaver in JUNGLE ACTION #10, but faced defeat at the hands of the Panther. Killmonger stole weapons from the Wakandan armory and directed King Karnaj to attack T’Challa in JUNGLE ACTION #11, and dumped an unconscious Black Panther into the wolf-ridden Land of the Chilling Mists in JUNGLE ACTION #12.

Returning to the States and the Avengers, the Panther aided Spider-Man in a conflict with Stegron the Dinosaur Man in MARVEL TEAM-UP #20, then joined with his teammates in battle with the Collector in AVENGERS #119, and a long campaign against the Zodiac in AVENGERS #121123. In the aftermath of that fight, T’Challa helped activate a Zodiac weapon that unfortunately brought the dreaded, dragon-like Star-Stalker to Earth in AVENGERS #124.

Avengers (1963) #126

Avengers (1963) #126

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Next, the Panther served valiantly in an immense struggle between the mad god Thanos and Earth’s Mightiest Heroes in AVENGERS #125, and then a rematch with his old foe Klaw and the energy-charged Solarr in AVENGERS #126.

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T'Challa proves his worth to the Avengers, teams with Daredevil, and more!

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

The big day arrived for the Wasp and Yellowjacket in AVENGERS #60, a wedding witnessed by the Black Panther, who also took part in the simultaneous battle against party crasher the Ringmaster and his Circus of Crime.

T’Challa teamed with the Vision to confront the giant Ymir in Wakanda in AVENGERS #61, a ploy by the devilish Asmodeus to sew chaos throughout the world. Later, the Panther invited all of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes to his country in AVENGERS #62, but M’Baku the Man-Ape chose that occasion to attempt a coup and destroy his rival.

The Avengers held a wake for a seemingly dead Captain America in CAPTAIN AMERICA #113, but when they later learned of his return in CAPTAIN AMERICA #114, the Black Panther decided to allow the famous hero his privacy. T’Challa also aided Daredevil at this time, in DAREDEVIL #52, when the Man Without Fear suffered from radiation poisoning and had his hands full with the problem of Starr Saxon.

Avengers (1963) #62

Avengers (1963) #62

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Mislead by the villainous Egghead in AVENGERS #63, the Panther raced out with his teammates to rescue the Black Widow while back at headquarters Hawkeye fashioned himself into the new Goliath. Egghead’s scheme led to a confrontation aboard his space station in AVENGERS #64, and a bout with the Swordsman in AVENGERS #65.

After a short break, the Black Panther returned to help the team track down a revived Ultron in AVENGERS #68, then worked to convince them to back Kang in the Grandmaster’s Game of the Galaxies in AVENGERS #69. This led to a sprawling fight with the Squadron Sinister in AVENGERS #70, and T’Challa, the Vision, and Yellowjacket being transported by Kang back to 1942 for a scuffle with Captain America, Namor the Sub-Mariner, and the original Human Torch in AVENGERS #72.

Shortly after returning to the present, T’Challa encountered a singer who was under attack in AVENGERS #73, and asked his fellow heroes to allow him to battle the bigoted Sons of the Serpent on his own. After his capture by the Sons, the Panther chafed under his imprisonment in AVENGERS #74 while an imposter Black Panther confused the public and Earth’s Mightiest Heroes.

Quicksilver returned in AVENGERS #75 to inform the team of his sister Wanda’s abduction to Polemachus, the other-dimensional home of Arkon. The Avengers and T’Challa made their way to Polemachus in AVENGERS #76 to confront Arkon, but the wily ruler traveled to Earth in retreat and suffered his defeat there.

While the team struggled with the wicked Cornelius Van Lunt, T’Challa took on a new identity in AVENGERS #77, that of “Luke Charles,” a high school teacher. He joined with his fellow Avengers again in INCREDIBLE HULK #128 to attempt to capture the Hulk with a Gammatron Bombarder.

Daredevil (1964) #69

Daredevil (1964) #69

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Captain America made his way back to Avengers Mansion in AVENGERS #78, only to be waylaid by the Black Panther’s old foe the Man-Ape. When the villain challenged T’Challa to single combat, the fight ushered in the Lethal Legion, a collection of crooks with beefs against the heroes. In AVENGERS #79, the Avengers defeated their opponents and also learned new information of the Vision’s creation.

A new incarnation of the Native American hero Red Wolf debuted in AVENGERS #80 to warn the group about a new scheme by Cornelius Van Lunt. The Black Panther returned to his teaching job and opened up an investigation into the Thunderbolt gang, which led to a team-up with the Man Without Fear in DAREDEVIL #69. When the Zodiac captured the Avengers in AVENGERS #81, it fell to T’Challa and Daredevil to rescue them in AVENGERS #82.

When all seemed quiet afterward, the mystical Enchantress disguised herself as Valkyrie and commanded a team of female warriors to battle the Black Panther and the Avengers in AVENGERS #83.

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Relive T'Challa's historic debut and tag along for his first groundbreaking adventures!

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

The famous Fantastic Four found themselves amazed by the gift of a technologically advanced flying vessel in 1966’s FANTASTIC FOUR #52, a present from the people Wakanda and an invitation to visit their small African nation. Upon landing in a bio-organic mechanical forest, the super hero family fended off a seeming attack by a black-clad individual, only to discover him as T’Challa, the leader of Wakanda and known as their champion, the Black Panther.

In FANTASTIC FOUR #53, the Panther explained to Reed Richards and the others that his country’s greatest asset, the sound-absorbing metal vibranium, existed only within its borders. He further detailed a recent attempt by the evil Ulysses Klaw to steal the metal, a fact then made all-too clear by Klaw’s attack on T’Challa and the FF. The heroes held the poacher off, and Klaw disappeared into his own sonic device.

Fantastic Four (1961) #52

Fantastic Four (1961) #52

  • Published: July 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Hotheaded Johnny Storm wanted to visit his Inhuman girlfriend in FANTASTIC FOUR #54, so T’Challa lent him a Wakandan flying craft to rush to the Hidden Land. There, the Human Torch became embroiled in a dangerous fight against Prestor John and the Evil Eye. T’Challa also gifted Reed with pure vibranium bands in FANTASTIC FOUR #56 to defeat Klaw again and made his first 1967 appearance dealing with yet another flying ship in FANTASTIC FOUR #60 when the team returned to America and Doctor Doom stole the Silver Surfer’s cosmic power to try and take over the world.

Upon an expedition to Panther Island in FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #5, the Black Panther and his Wakandan soldiers discovered both the intrepid Inhumans and evidence of the Psycho-Man’s underground headquarters. T’Challa joined with the Fantastic Four soon after to turn the tide against the emotion-controlling villain and send him packing back to the Microverse.

Captain America never expected a summons from far-off exotic Wakanda, but one arrived in 1968’s TALES OF SUSPENSE #97 to bring the Black Panther’s plea for Cap to help him against an invasion by mysterious forces.

Cap’s Wakandan flying craft came under attack on his way to the African country in TALES OF SUSPENSE #98, just the first salvo in T’Challa’s war with Baron Zemo and the villain’s orbiting solar ray projector. It took timely assistance from Agent 13 in TALES OF SUSPENSE #99 to turn the tide against Zemo, but Cap and the Panther still fought hard to win the day in CAPTAIN AMERICA #100.

Tales of Suspense (1959) #98

Tales of Suspense (1959) #98

  • Published: February 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 28, 2007
  • Penciller: Gene Colan
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

After things settled down a bit, Cap called his fellow Avengers back in the States to strongly suggest they consider T’Challa for membership among Earth’s Mightiest Heroes in AVENGERS #51. When the Panther flew to their New York headquarters to meet the famous team in AVENGERS #52 he discovered a room full of seemingly deceased heroes. It took being arrested and squaring off against the dreaded Grim Reaper for T’Challa to win his spurs as the newest member of the Avengers.

With little time to settle in, the Black Panther found himself at odds with the Magneto-controlled X-Men in AVENGERS #53 and skirmishes with both Cyclops and the Beast. Once the confusion cleared, he stood with his teammates in battle against his old foe Klaw and the new Masters of Evil in AVENGERS #54, and the revelation of stone-cold Ultron-5 behind the scenes of the attack in AVENGERS #55.

Avengers (1963) #52

Avengers (1963) #52

What is Marvel Unlimited?

The Panther joined with Captain America to travel back in time in AVENGERS #56 to solve the mystery of Cap’s partner Bucky during World War II, but that stood as only an appetizer for the adventure of meeting the synthezoid Vision in AVENGERS #57. Later, T’Challa helped welcome the Vision into the ranks of the team in AVENGERS #58, as well as find himself baffled by the appearance of newcomer Yellowjacket and the disappearance of Hank Pym in AVENGERS #59.

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Jack Kirby gives Captain America a final test with The Night Flyer!

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

Jack Kirby’s work on CAPTAIN AMERICA began with his co-creation of the character, alongside Joe Simon, in 1941. The King continued across eras with the Sentinel of Liberty, finally wrapping up more than three decades later in 1977. And as his time as the writer, editor, and artist on the series came to a close, he decided to bring a new character into the mix: The Night Flyer.

Kirby started issue #213 with a characteristic bang as readers witnessed Steve Rogers back in all his star-spangled glory, fighting Nazis and the Red Skull. This, however, turned out to be a nightmare occurring inside Cap’s head; prior to this issue, he’d been temporarily blinded during a battle with the Skull, leaving him to recover in a S.H.I.E.L.D. hospital bed.

Captain America (1968) #212

Captain America (1968) #212

  • Published: August 10, 1977
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 17, 2008
What is Marvel Unlimited?

The planned rest and recovery proved to be difficult for Rogers, as the patient in the bed next to him—known only as The Defector—kept attracting assassins! Steve, still unable to see, took out the first of these attackers with relative ease, but had no idea that The Corporation intended on sending more to finish the job.

The mysterious organization’s Kligger and Veda decided to bring in an operative known as The Night Flyer—a man described as “a cultist…a mystic…a ritualist, dedicated to the art of killing.” Readers got a peek at his strange perfectionist tendencies before The Night Flyer headed for the hospital, ready to put an end to his mark.

Captain America (1968) #213

Captain America (1968) #213

  • Published: September 10, 1977
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 17, 2008
What is Marvel Unlimited?

The villain expertly made his way past not only a visiting Falcon, but also some of S.H.I.E.L.D.’s finest sharpshooters. After briefly getting captured, The Night Flyer managed to escape after blowing up a roomful of agents. Intent on finishing the job, he made his way through the facility before Sam Wilson caught up with the killer, though the Flyer bested him again.

Unwilling to sit the fight out, a hazy-eyed Captain America donned his red, white, and blue gear, leaping into the fray. He caught up with the Night Flyer’s contact inside the hospital before coming face to face with the assassin himself. The Flyer responded to Cap by utilizing a flamethrower—but Rogers held his own long enough for S.H.I.E.L.D. to spot the Flyer’s glider and blast it out of the sky.

Captain America (1968) #214

Captain America (1968) #214

  • Published: October 10, 1977
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 17, 2008
What is Marvel Unlimited?

As The Night Flyer tumbled to the ground, Captain America emerged, steadfast, victorious yet again—a fond farewell to the Sentinel of Liberty from his creator, Jack Kirby.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more on Jack Kirby and join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100!

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Captain America and The Falcon take a wild ride to different dimension!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

In the 1960s, Jack Kirby worked with Stan Lee to start building up the Marvel Universe. Many fans rightfully think of that era as truly magical, a fount of creative energy focused on the task of making heroes and villains that would stand the test of time. But it’s also important to look at the 70s work of “The King,” when he wrote, drew and edited a batch of books that included DEVIL DINOSAUR, MACHINE MAN, and BLACK PANTHER as well as his return to the character and title he launched, CAPTAIN AMERICA.

Kirby kicked his latter day run on Cap’s book with an epic story called “Madbomb,” a tale filled with many of the hallmarks of his work from the krackle to the positive social message. Seemingly hard to top, he tried with the story starting in CAPTAIN AMERICA #201, which pits Steve Rogers and his partner Falcon against a mysterious group called the Night People of Zero Street!

The Night People not only wanted to recruit Cap as their own hero, but also launched a crime wave that hit everything from grocers and jewelers to pet and costume stores! They even swiped projectors from late night movie houses! After talking to one of the Madbomb makers, Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson thought they’d have a chance to relax, but then heard about the mysterious new group from Sam’s girlfriend Leila right before those very same denizens of Zero Street kidnapped her in an effort to bring Falcon and Cap to them!

Captain America (1968) #201

Captain America (1968) #201

  • Published: September 10, 1976
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 17, 2008
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Falcon flew off in a hurry, but accidentally hit an oncoming plane flown by Texas Jack Mudloon, a wealthy adventurer. After thanking Jack, Falcon flew off again, this time right into the portal to Zero Street! On the other side, the Night People grabbed him, put Falcon and Leila on trial, and then gave them shock treatment.

Back on Earth, Captain America heard about Falcon vanishing and got to work finding him in issue #202 which led the Star-Spangled Avenger to also meet Muldoon. While they figured out how to find Wilson, Sam himself—now brainwashed—moved to fight a huge, craggy, fire-breathing monster on behalf of the Night People. At the same time, Cap waited for another portal to Zero Street to open up so he could leap into action. Unbeknownst to him, Texas Jack followed him through as well!

In #203, Cap and Jack learned that an Earthly asylum had been transported to another dimension years ago, creating Zero Street and the Night People by extension. More surprises came when Rogers ran into Leila and Falcon, neither of whom recognized him! The local leaders offered the new arrivals the choice of either death or a change like the one Sam and Leila went through. While they thought on that, a small army of monsters like the one Falcon previously fought attacked. Cap got the information and equipment he needed and used a portal to Earth to get everyone to safety before blowing the machinery up, leaving Zero Street to the invaders.

As he tended to do when left to his own devices, Kirby not only offered up a super-fun super hero story with cowboys and monsters and alternate dimensions, but also social commentary on African Americans’ treatment in the justice system and also the status of those who had been institutionalized.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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Captain America takes on Batroc, Swordsman, and Living Laser!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

Jack Kirby’s impressive battle scenes proved so captivating that he and writer Stan Lee would integrate them into comics even when they didn’t necessarily need to be there! Take CAPTAIN AMERICA #105 for example: it started with a one page splash of Cap, Bucky, and the Army rushing towards a Nazi contingent in the foreground before giving way to a gorgeous two-page spread of all the patriotic heroes smashing through the German line! The comic itself even told us that these images essentially existed because Kirby excelled in that arena. “We’ll admit this doesn’t have much to do with the stirring saga that follows, but we just couldn’t resist giving Jolly Jack a chance to let himself go on this sizzling scene…and we kinda suspect that no True Believer amongst you is gonna complain!”

By the next page we discovered that these snapshots of action existed in a presentation of combat films being shown to Steve Rogers in an effort to get him to narrate the project for TV. Instead of exciting the Avenger, though, these glimpses of his partner in patriotism simply reminded him that Bucky Barnes did not make it out of World War II alive. Rogers walked right out of the meeting without giving an answer to narration job. Instead, he thought about getting himself out of love interest Sharon Carter’s life for fear it would bring danger or even death to her. Instead, he chose to rush right into danger.

At that very moment, Batroc the Leaper met with his new partners in crime Swordsman and Living Laser to steal a Seismo-Bomb from a spy before the U.S. government could get their hands on it. Somebody must have heard Cap’s wishes, because we then cut to him getting a mission briefing about the same weapon. S.H.I.E.L.D. had gotten the man who brought it into the country, but he died before they could find the device itself.

Captain America (1968) #105

Captain America (1968) #105

  • Published: September 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Moments after leaping into action to find the potentially city-destroying explosive, the Shield-Slinger saw the trio of enemies also hunting for the same object. We then got treated to a multi-page Kirby-drawn fight between Cap and Swordsman while the other two continued looking for the Seismo-Bomb. Though the villain’s weapon featured far more tricks and surprises, Cap relied on his fists to take his opponent out! Next, the Avenger went up against the Living Laser and his chaotic energy blasts. Once again, Rogers used his honed skills as a hand-to-hand combatant and master tactician to disable LL’s weapons and get the information he needed to stop Batroc.

All of that led to a thrilling battle between two of the best fighters in the Marvel Universe as Manhattan’s fate stood in the balance. However, when Cap explained the potential devastation—and impending death—that would result from the Seismo-Bomb detonated, Batroc ran off leaving our hero to dismantle the device just in time!

This issue stands as a shining example not only of the battlefield scenes mentioned above, but Kirby’s absolute expertise in presenting action and super fights in a way that’s clear, concise, and packed with danger. In other words: this issue offers plenty of evidence as to why Kirby will always be King!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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The King's Silver Age Marvel work comes to a close with a milestone for the Fantastic Four and more.

In celebration of Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday, we’re reviewing the man’s legendary creations with a year-by-year examination of his unparalleled career at Marvel Comics. Read on and witness the work that made him comic book royalty.

The year 1969 became a turning point in the career of Jack Kirby as the legendary artist began what would be his final Marvel projects during the Silver Age of Comics.

Jack wound down his output even more in the last year of the Swingin’ Sixties, passing CAPTAIN AMERICA off to newer artists like Barry Windsor Smith and concentrating on his landmarks, FANTASTIC FOUR and THOR. With Stan Lee, Jack dove into an appearance by the mysterious Inhumans in FANTASTIC FOUR #82, as well as a new Doctor Doom saga that began in FANTASTIC FOUR #84. Later in the year, he and Lee created a planet of Skrulls who’d adopted an early-20th century gangster lifestyle in FANTASTIC FOUR #92, which led to the Thing battling a fantastic new Kirby creation, the robot Torgo, in FANTASTIC FOUR #93.

In CAPTAIN AMERICA #109, jack provided a big send-off for the Sentinel of Liberty with a retelling of his origin, then returned for a single story of super heroes’ remembrances of Cap in CAPTAIN AMERICA #112.

Captain America (1968) #109

Captain America (1968) #109

  • Published: January 10, 1969
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

One Jack greatest co-creation, Galactus, returned in THOR #160 to bedevil the Thunder God as well as another Kirby stand-out character, Ego the Living Planet. Later, in THOR #165, Thor battle Him before Galactus returned once more to stomp his way through the rest of the year.

As 1970 dawned, Jack made plans to leave Marvel. He’d already logged artwork for upcoming issues of his books and finished more in the first few months of the year. This provided Marvel and its fans a few more chances to see “The King” on their favorite characters before his departure.

Fantastic Four (1961) #100

Fantastic Four (1961) #100

  • Published: July 10, 1970
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Jack had drawn many a spooky witch in his early days on monster and horror anthologies, but perhaps his superlative success with the them came in the form of Agatha Harkness, introduced in FANTASTIC FOUR #94. A few issues later, Stan and Jack celebrated one-hundred installments of “The World’s Greatest Comic Magazine” in FANTASTIC FOUR #100, and then followed that up with a clash between the FF and Namor the Sub-Mariner with his new ally Magneto.

Over in THOR, Jack surrounded the Thunder God with the flames of Surtur in THOR #176, and then ended his run on the book with the incredible cover of Thor in all his glory on THOR #177.

Thor (1966) #177

Thor (1966) #177

  • Published: June 10, 1970
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: June 24, 2011
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

One fascinating footnote of Jack’s last days at Marvel arrived in the form of a new anthology Stan called AMAZING ADVENTURES. In the first four issues, Jack not only drew an amazing solo adventure of his Inhumans, but also scripted it, too. This rare combination of writing and art put a singular capstone on Jack Kirby last collaborations with Marvel in the 1960s. From there, he made his way to DC, but by no means did he shut the door on ol’ Marvel for good…

Amazing Adventures (1970) #1

Amazing Adventures (1970) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?
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Cap gets his own title, while the FF battle a bevy of heroes and much more!

In celebration of Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday, we’re reviewing the man’s legendary creations with a year-by-year examination of his unparalleled career at Marvel Comics. Read on and witness the work that made him comic book royalty.

Superstar artist Jack Kirby continued to focus on only a few books in 1968, but one character of his in particular received even more attention from “The King” that year. In all, 1968 would prove to be another standout time for Kirby designs.

Over in FANTASTIC FOUR #70, Jack played around with the look of Sue Richards’ costume, adding a kind of skirt motif to it. It didn’t last long overall, but one Kirby creation that seemed poised to launch even higher into the stratosphere of popularity called himself the Silver Surfer, and he returned in FANTASTIC FOUR #72.

Jack also got to draw some of the other Marvel stars in guest-shot appearances in FANTASTIC FOUR #73, aided writer-editor Stan Lee in Galactus’ latest mischief-making in FANTASTIC FOUR #74 and #75, and played around again with the Thing’s wish to change back to plain ol’ Ben Grimm permanently in FANTASTIC FOUR #78.

Perhaps the biggest news that year for FF fans arrived in Lee and Kirby’s FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #6 blockbuster. In it, Jack unleashed the spooky Annihilus, a weird insect-like tyrant who ruled over the Negative Zone and stood in the team’s way of securing a cure for Sue’s condition. What condition might that’ve been? None other than dangerous amounts of radiation in her body endangering the birth of her first child, Franklin Richards. Stan and Jack saw her through, though, and the old Kirby artistic touch seemed right at home at delineating babies.

To increase the tall tales inn the fabled halls of Asgard, Jack added the powerful, cosmic crowbar-wielding Wrecker to THOR #148, and designed a cool new monster, Mangog, for the Thunder God to lay the hammer down upon in THOR #154.

Jack’s World War II super hero soldier received his own title in 1968 when Lee converted his 11-page adventures in TALES OF SUSPENSE into a glorious 20-page Kirby extravaganza aptly named CAPTAIN AMERICA. Cap hit the ground running and jumping in CAPTAIN AMERICA #100 and enjoying the company of Stan and Jack’s Black Panther for a clash with the masked Baron Zemo. The Red Skull dropped in for another bout with his arch-nemesis in CAPTAIN AMERICA #101, and Jack whipped up a creepy headshrinker in the form of Doctor Faustus in CAPTAIN AMERICA #107.

The remainder of Jack’s free-time—ha ha—in 1968 rounded out with his usual layout service for other books, and also his incredible control over covers. Two such knock-outs that year must be the Daredevil-Captain America boxing match from DAREDEVIL #43, and the high-flying new cover for TALES OF ASGARD #1, which reprinted Stan and Jack’s back-up feature from THOR.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more on Jack Kirby and join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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Jack and Stan Lee pit Captain America against The Red Skull once again!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

In 1968, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby broke the Sentinel of Liberty out of TALES OF SUSPENSE and finally gave him back a solo book starting with CAPTAIN AMERICA #100. That first issue wrapped up a story that had begun in the previous book, but #101 launched the series’ first multi-part adventure, which revolved around Cap tracking down Nazis like Werner von Krimm, otherwise known as the Butcher of Lichtengarten, and punching their faces in! To the shield slinger’s shock, Nick Fury popped up during the fracas and helped the Nazi leave the scene. The head of S.H.I.E.L.D., of course, had a plan: he’d placed a tracer on Von Klimm and sent him on his way so that they could figure out who he really worked for.

The big boss turned out to be none other than The Red Skull, who needed Von Klimm to deliver the key that would help him awaken The Fourth Sleeper. Back in TALES OF SUSPENSE #7274, we saw that the crimson war criminal had hidden three other such machines, but hoped this one would prove more successful than the previous trio.

After explaining how he escaped his apparent death in the pages of TALES OF SUSPENSE #91, Red Skull had to wait for Von Klimm to arrive. He didn’t realize that Cap followed the villain in an experimental flying saucer provided by Fury. Soon shot down, the Avenger jumped right into action, but the Skull’s agents got the drop on him.

Captain America (1968) #101

Captain America (1968) #101

  • Published: May 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
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Red Skull held the Soni-Crystal, which responded to his mind, as the guards brought their captive into the stronghold. Chaos erupted as The Fourth Sleeper awoke and immediately displayed its ability to control its own density. Cap took advantage to escape his immediate captors and then learned from the Skull that this Sleeper had the added ability to explode, potentially taking the world with it! As the first issue ended, the Sleeper exhibited its massive power by first blowing up the Skull’s secret base and then sending explosions up the coast. Though it seemed like he couldn’t have possibly survived, Rogers came out with both his life and the key!

In CAPTAIN AMERICA #102, our hero reunited with Nick Fury and got outfitted to take on the Sleeper. In addition to taking out a gang of assassins who tried ambushing him right after he left his S.H.I.E.L.D. briefing, Cap also reunited with Agent Carter who now found herself tasked with helping him on his mission. Meanwhile, Red Skull revealed that he also had an army of followers called Exiles who had been training on an island since the end of World War II. He used these agents to try and stop Cap and Agent 13 from halting the engine of destruction, but the duo bested them.

Finally, as The Fourth Sleeper appeared out of nowhere thanks to its atomic control of itself, Cap handed the key to Carter and threw himself in the robotic creature’s path. Carter’s intense feelings for Rogers filtered through the key and wound up completely dissipating it! Ultimately, this story filled with classic Kirby and Lee storytelling and visuals ended on a positive note thanks to their belief that love could conquer mindless evil, even the kind that threatened the very existence of the planet!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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