One of the Avengers’ most powerful foes debuts against Captain America!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

Over the years, Captain America has proven himself as one of the most capable heroes in the Marvel Universe. It seems like no matter what he comes up against he ultimately walks away with the win. But Jack Kirby and Stan Lee gave the Sentinel of Liberty an enormous challenge in 1966’s TALES OF SUSPENSE #8284, a story that kicked off with the Avenger seemingly losing his mind and ended with our hero facing the full power of his teammates!

In the initial entry, Cap spent a quiet evening at Avengers Mansion that soon became more than a little troubling. Seeing ghosts from his past like Agent Axis and Fang the Warlord, Steve Rogers feared that he might be losing his mind. That feeling intensified when he found himself mysteriously transported back to World War II where he not only reunited with Bucky but campaigned anew against his Axis enemies. Passing in and out of reality, the super-soldier eventually fell to his knees, but faithful Jarvis stood nearby to catch the beleaguered hero.

Nearby, S.H.I.E.L.D. agents combed through a blown-up A.I.M. lab previously seen in STRANGE TALES #149. They discovered a survivor, Count Bornag Royale, who revealed that something called The Adaptoid ran free in the world working to “win the final victory.”

Tales of Suspense (1959) #82

Tales of Suspense (1959) #82

  • Published: October 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 28, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

We then cut back to Avengers Mansion where we got our first glimpse of said Adaptoid as it changed from Jarvis into Captain America! The robot also admitted to slipping Cap a Hypno-Sedative to knock him out! Having taken over the Star-Spangled Avenger’s identity, this new evil next faced an unexpected challenge as a costumed character calling himself The Tumbler smashed his way into the mansion! The ensuing battle messed with the creature’s plans to first destroy Captain America and then move on to S.H.I.E.L.D. itself!

Tumbler actually proved so effective that he took out “Cap-daptoid” and tied him up! The doppelganger broke free and re-engaged with his new enemy. The ruckus, though, woke up the actual Captain America who jumped into battle, easily taking care of Tumbler. Cap and Jarvis then carried the seemingly unconscious shape-shifter to the Lab Analysis Room where the Adaptoid hatched the next phase of his plan.

As it happened, the Avengers played right into this new scheme. Cap brought in his teammates Goliath, Wasp, and Hawkeye to check out the new foe which gave it time to absorb their powers, thus turning itself into The Super-Adaptoid! The upgraded villain then revealed itself to Captain America who leaped right into battle with his emerald-hued opponent. Their fight started at Avenger’s Mansion, but ultimately moved to the sky over the city. After the shield-slinger tumbled into the river below, Super-Adaptoid assumed he’d succeeded in the first part of its mission. It then waited for the next assignment from A.I.M., but heard nothing. Wanting to retain its autonomy, Super-Adaptoid took off to find refuge in this strange new world it found himself living in!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

Read More

Captain America and Nick Fury team up to take on a terrorist cartel!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

Captain America and Nick Fury might not exactly see eye-to-eye on all things when it comes to keeping the good people of the world safe, but we all know they’d both do anything to ensure peace and prosperity. In the pages of TALES OF SUSPENSE #78 from 1966, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby brought the world’s number one super spy into the Sentinel of Liberty’s book to finally figure the true identity of a group previously only referred to as “Them.”

Fury came in with a unique device he wanted Cap to look at, a miniature brain that could grow into a humanoid when added to the right combination of chemicals. He knew it had belonged to “Them,” but still hadn’t IDed the group. As the two heroes pondered the mystery, an aircraft dropped off a strange new visitor outside: a robot! The automaton changed from white to orange and then melted its way right through the walls of Avengers Mansion to confront our patriotic pals.

Fury emptied his clip with no effect, but Cap knew the house’s security system better, turning on the Frigi-Defense which would drop the temperature in the room to freezing with a quickness. When even that failed to slow their pursuer down, the valiant veterans decided to take on their foe face-to-face. It easily brushed Fury’s advances off, but failed to avoid the star-spangled hero’s mighty shield. The Avenger even got the attacker on its back, but a quick dose of chemicals knocked him out.

Tales of Suspense (1959) #78

Tales of Suspense (1959) #78

  • Published: June 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 28, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

The action then cut to a mysterious super-lab filled with people wearing yellow jump suits and masks. Though readers at the time didn’t know it just yet, they’d just been introduced to those nefarious scientists in Advanced Idea Mechanics, otherwise known as A.I.M.! At the time, they remained focused on using their genius-level intellects to build an army of artificial lifeforms to do their bidding.

Back at Avengers HQ, a revived Cap rejoined Fury in battle, realizing that, with its ability to mix elements, this new foe could potentially go nuclear. With the doomsday clock potentially ticking down, Nick jammed a secret pill down the robot’s mouth and Captain America landed one more powerful blow that finally felled the beast. Before their eyes, the artificial being withered into a husk of its former self. Fury then informed Steve Rogers that the Avengers had better stay out of the “Them” hunt for now and left having given the super-soldier a S.H.I.E.L.D. Priority A-1 badge!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

Read More

Captain America locks horns once more with his arch-nemesis!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

Jack Kirby legendarily shouldered all of the penciling responsibilities when it came to CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS #1 back in 1941. That issue not only concisely introduced the world to Cap and Bucky, but also their number one villain, The Red Skull. In CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS #3, writer Joe Simon and Kirby brought the soon-to-be stalwart villain back into our heroes’ lives. Just look at that maniacal look on the Skull’s face as seen on the cover as he tied Bucky to a bomb right next to the already-trapped Betty Ross whilst Captain America valiantly busts in to free his friends!

For a quick reminder, the first Red Skull seen in the Shield-Slinger’s inaugural issue turned out to be George Maxon. He used an injection drug to scare people to death, but ultimately rolled over on his own needle, seemingly overdosing in the process. However, as CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS #3 kicked off, the man rose back up, claiming that he’d basically inoculated himself against his own drug. With that, the villain set about to gain revenge on the heroes and America itself! He got right to work by stealing plans for a U.S. made power drill and also exhibiting his new Touch of Death defense which killed anyone who came in contact with his person!

The Skull continued rolling right along with his nefarious plan as he had his minions spread word of his return, causing a wave of terror, followed immediately by an attack of the power drill that bored a hole right through a major city, killing thousands. Bucky and Cap leaped right into action, even grabbing on to the massive drill, but soon fell back when the bad guys turned their guns on our champions. Meanwhile, a carnival barker decided to capitalize on the patriotic pair’s fame and had a couple of goons dress up as them. The charlatan then charged a dime for people to come in and shake hands.

Captain America Comics (1941) #3

Captain America Comics (1941) #3

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Though the real deals broke up the racket, Red Skull didn’t hear about the con and broke in with his henchmen to kidnap his supposed enemies! Unfortunately for the fill-ins, the Skull hung them just before Captain America and Bucky could get there. However, they did succeed in blowing up the mad man’s power drill with a good, old-fashioned bomb!

Kirby also drew a fun mix of anti-Nazi and horror stories called “The Hunchback of Hollywood” and “The Movie Murder,” which found our heroes investigating threats to film designed with an anti-fascist message. This one not only featured Steve Rogers dressed up as a knight in the picture, but also Cap storming a castle by way of catapult! Other issue highlights include a prose story called “Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge” written by a kid named Stan Lee, another Cap and Bucky adventure called “The Queer Case of the Murdering Butterfly and the Ancient Mummies,” and a Reed Crandall-drawn Hurricane, Master of Speed tale that Simon and Kirby wrote!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

Read More

A brand new Swordsman aims to make Cap’s life miserable

Captain America just wants to travel across America and right the small injustices that he has often missed. A simple wish, a noble one. And one the brand new Swordsman has no intention of letting Cap achieve without a fight.

Mark Waid took a moment from learning blacksmithing to tell us about the new villain, give credit to his collaborator Chris Samnee, and continue to promote the rehabilitation of Steve Rogers.

Marvel.com: To start from a broad perspective, as a writer what about creating a new Swordsman appealed to you? What kind of challenges did the character present in terms of being revamped and reintroduced?

Mark Waid: To be honest, it was Chris Samnee’s suggestion. The challenge was to introduce and motivate him quickly to make room for a dynamic sword vs. shield battle!

Marvel.com: As much as you can, without spoiling things, what does this new Swordsman have in common and how does he differ from his predecessors who used that name?

Mark Waid: He looks very much the same—I wouldn’t be surprised if there were some relation to the original Swordsman—but this one’s different in that he’s basically an extortionist. That, and he may or may not be being played by someone else.

Marvel.com: As an antagonist, how does he fit in with the overall theme of this opening arc of Steve reconnecting with himself and rediscovering Captain America?

Mark Waid: Cap has to fight Swordsman to save an entire small town from destruction. As is the ongoing theme of this book, this is about Steve Rogers connecting with and saving ordinary people in the heartland, the kinds of people he doesn’t often encounter in New York or Washington.

Marvel.com: Given your history, it is clear you and Chris Samnee make an excellent team. On creating the new Swordsman, how did that collaboration work? How much did Chris help you determine things like the character’s personality, motives, and such, and how did you help him to craft the character’s look?

Mark Waid: Straight up, this is 90% Chris. I’m terrible at design, so I always leave that to my collaborators—but giving the Swordsman a unique voice was my challenge to face.

Marvel.com: To stay with art for a moment, Matthew Wilson’s coloring, in collaboration with Chris’s art, favors something sunnier and more open than with previous team ups for Daredevil and Black Widow. How does that help you to realize the themes of the arc? How does it inspire your conception of the action, set pieces, and so on of each issue?

Mark Waid: Cap doesn’t live in a dark, foreboding world–or if he runs across it, he provides a light. That’s it in a nutshell.

Marvel.com: What makes this issue a great point to jump on to the book?

Mark Waid: It’s a clean done-in-one story that hits home the ideals for which Captain America stands and what his physical limits are. If you like Steve Rogers on the screen, you’ll love him on the printed page.

Read CAPTAIN AMERICA #695, by Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee, now, and don’t miss part 2 with CAPTAIN AMERICA #696 on December 6!

Read More

Captain America and The Falcon take a wild ride to different dimension!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

In the 1960s, Jack Kirby worked with Stan Lee to start building up the Marvel Universe. Many fans rightfully think of that era as truly magical, a fount of creative energy focused on the task of making heroes and villains that would stand the test of time. But it’s also important to look at the 70s work of “The King,” when he wrote, drew and edited a batch of books that included DEVIL DINOSAUR, MACHINE MAN, and BLACK PANTHER as well as his return to the character and title he launched, CAPTAIN AMERICA.

Kirby kicked his latter day run on Cap’s book with an epic story called “Madbomb,” a tale filled with many of the hallmarks of his work from the krackle to the positive social message. Seemingly hard to top, he tried with the story starting in CAPTAIN AMERICA #201, which pits Steve Rogers and his partner Falcon against a mysterious group called the Night People of Zero Street!

The Night People not only wanted to recruit Cap as their own hero, but also launched a crime wave that hit everything from grocers and jewelers to pet and costume stores! They even swiped projectors from late night movie houses! After talking to one of the Madbomb makers, Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson thought they’d have a chance to relax, but then heard about the mysterious new group from Sam’s girlfriend Leila right before those very same denizens of Zero Street kidnapped her in an effort to bring Falcon and Cap to them!

Captain America (1968) #201

Captain America (1968) #201

  • Published: September 10, 1976
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 17, 2008
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Falcon flew off in a hurry, but accidentally hit an oncoming plane flown by Texas Jack Mudloon, a wealthy adventurer. After thanking Jack, Falcon flew off again, this time right into the portal to Zero Street! On the other side, the Night People grabbed him, put Falcon and Leila on trial, and then gave them shock treatment.

Back on Earth, Captain America heard about Falcon vanishing and got to work finding him in issue #202 which led the Star-Spangled Avenger to also meet Muldoon. While they figured out how to find Wilson, Sam himself—now brainwashed—moved to fight a huge, craggy, fire-breathing monster on behalf of the Night People. At the same time, Cap waited for another portal to Zero Street to open up so he could leap into action. Unbeknownst to him, Texas Jack followed him through as well!

In #203, Cap and Jack learned that an Earthly asylum had been transported to another dimension years ago, creating Zero Street and the Night People by extension. More surprises came when Rogers ran into Leila and Falcon, neither of whom recognized him! The local leaders offered the new arrivals the choice of either death or a change like the one Sam and Leila went through. While they thought on that, a small army of monsters like the one Falcon previously fought attacked. Cap got the information and equipment he needed and used a portal to Earth to get everyone to safety before blowing the machinery up, leaving Zero Street to the invaders.

As he tended to do when left to his own devices, Kirby not only offered up a super-fun super hero story with cowboys and monsters and alternate dimensions, but also social commentary on African Americans’ treatment in the justice system and also the status of those who had been institutionalized.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

Read More

Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, Spider-Man, Star-Lord and Black Widow will be part of the fun!

Today at Comic Con in London, Vice President Franchise Creative and Marketing for Marvel Studios, Dave Bushore and Creative Director of Disneyland Paris, Mark Huffman announced that the Marvel Super Heroes are coming to Disneyland Paris in the summer 2018 from June 10 to September 30.

Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, Spider-Man, Star-Lord and Black Widow will appear for the first time exclusively at Disneyland Paris in summer 2018 in a special Marvel Summer of Super Heroes season. Your favorite heroes will be featured in the Walt Disney Studios Park for exciting meet & greets and breathtaking, epic shows.

But that’s not all for Marvel fans at Disneyland Paris. As first announced at D23 Expo this summer, Disneyland Paris is also re-imagining one of its Resort Hotels into a universe that would make Tony Stark proud. Disney’s Hotel New York – The Art of Marvel will transport guests to the action-packed, inspiring world of Super Heroes including Iron Man, The Avengers, and Spider Man among others. Work on Disney’s Hotel New York – The Art of Marvel will begin in October of 2018 and it will open in 2020.

Stay tuned for more updates on Marvel Summer of Super Heroes.

Read More

Captain America takes on Batroc, Swordsman, and Living Laser!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

Jack Kirby’s impressive battle scenes proved so captivating that he and writer Stan Lee would integrate them into comics even when they didn’t necessarily need to be there! Take CAPTAIN AMERICA #105 for example: it started with a one page splash of Cap, Bucky, and the Army rushing towards a Nazi contingent in the foreground before giving way to a gorgeous two-page spread of all the patriotic heroes smashing through the German line! The comic itself even told us that these images essentially existed because Kirby excelled in that arena. “We’ll admit this doesn’t have much to do with the stirring saga that follows, but we just couldn’t resist giving Jolly Jack a chance to let himself go on this sizzling scene…and we kinda suspect that no True Believer amongst you is gonna complain!”

By the next page we discovered that these snapshots of action existed in a presentation of combat films being shown to Steve Rogers in an effort to get him to narrate the project for TV. Instead of exciting the Avenger, though, these glimpses of his partner in patriotism simply reminded him that Bucky Barnes did not make it out of World War II alive. Rogers walked right out of the meeting without giving an answer to narration job. Instead, he thought about getting himself out of love interest Sharon Carter’s life for fear it would bring danger or even death to her. Instead, he chose to rush right into danger.

At that very moment, Batroc the Leaper met with his new partners in crime Swordsman and Living Laser to steal a Seismo-Bomb from a spy before the U.S. government could get their hands on it. Somebody must have heard Cap’s wishes, because we then cut to him getting a mission briefing about the same weapon. S.H.I.E.L.D. had gotten the man who brought it into the country, but he died before they could find the device itself.

Captain America (1968) #105

Captain America (1968) #105

  • Published: September 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Moments after leaping into action to find the potentially city-destroying explosive, the Shield-Slinger saw the trio of enemies also hunting for the same object. We then got treated to a multi-page Kirby-drawn fight between Cap and Swordsman while the other two continued looking for the Seismo-Bomb. Though the villain’s weapon featured far more tricks and surprises, Cap relied on his fists to take his opponent out! Next, the Avenger went up against the Living Laser and his chaotic energy blasts. Once again, Rogers used his honed skills as a hand-to-hand combatant and master tactician to disable LL’s weapons and get the information he needed to stop Batroc.

All of that led to a thrilling battle between two of the best fighters in the Marvel Universe as Manhattan’s fate stood in the balance. However, when Cap explained the potential devastation—and impending death—that would result from the Seismo-Bomb detonated, Batroc ran off leaving our hero to dismantle the device just in time!

This issue stands as a shining example not only of the battlefield scenes mentioned above, but Kirby’s absolute expertise in presenting action and super fights in a way that’s clear, concise, and packed with danger. In other words: this issue offers plenty of evidence as to why Kirby will always be King!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

Read More

Mark Waid introduces Cap to Marvel Legacy!

On November 1, a new era begins for the Sentinel of Liberty with CAPTAIN AMERICA #695!

Marvel Legacy rises as writer Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee reunite in an attempt to restore Steve Rogers’ reputation—though it won’t be an easy task, as they’ve got to shine a shield tarnished by the events of Secret Empire. Back in the action wearing the famous red-white-and-blue, Captain America faces one of his toughest journeys yet—reconstructing his legacy.

How will he tackle the challenge? We caught up with Mark Waid to find out.

Marvel.com: What made CAPTAIN AMERICA the best fit for you—and for a reunited Waid-Samnee team—at this moment in time?

Mark Waid: It’s the best fit for me not only because I love Steve Rogers, but also because I’m smart enough to hang onto Chris Samnee’s coattails whenever possible. We make a good team, and it’s terrific to finally see Chris cut loose on a top-tier Marvel hero.

Marvel.com: How daunting of a task will it be to tell Cap’s story in the wake of Secret Empire? What do you see as the biggest challenge of such an undertaking?

Mark Waid: The biggest challenge will be, of course, restoring his reputation post-Secret Empire—but rather than be too bound to a timeline, our fans have made it clear that they want classic Cap, so we’ll be looking forward more than in the rear-view mirror.

Beyond that, it’s important to Team Cap that we make one thing abundantly clear: while we’re having a blast and giving you a very classic Steve Rogers, Chris and I have been working on these first few issues since March—way in advance of the more volatile political events of the summer. Because of our lead time, he won’t get around to punching Nazis on page one. But it’s coming.

Marvel.com: What does Steve currently see as his biggest hurdle to restoring his rep?

Mark Waid: To “find America,” as it were; to reconnect with a heartland he’s never really spent much time in. Steve claims to represent America and yet spends almost all his time in New York. He wants to change that.

Marvel.com: Do Americans still support him? Do they resent him?

Mark Waid: We’ve built at least a six-month delay from the end of Secret Empire into our first issue, so while there will be dark and shady looks glared his way—and there will be those who don’t trust him—not every issue finds Cap pleading for understanding. In fact, our first issue kind of overcompensates. You’ll see what we mean.

Marvel.com: What about the bad guys? How do they feel about Cap now?

Mark Waid: They feel that maybe they have a better shot at him, not only because he has no Avengers back-up, but because he’s still a little off his pins after Secret Empire.

Marvel.com: What do you foresee as the upcoming adversity for Cap? New threats? Classic threats refreshed? A combination?

Mark Waid: All the above. Kraven couldn’t have been a more perfect call—they’ve never duked it out—and wait until you see the weird, Kirby-by-way-of-Samnee villain showing up in issue #698…

Marvel.com: Can’t wait! One final question to wrap this up: when you first saw a piece of Chris’s artwork for this book, what went through your mind?

Mark Waid: That I should never complain about anything in life ever again.

Start a new chapter with CAPTAIN AMERICA #695, by Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee, on November 1!

Read More

The Golden Age heroes of Marvel unite under the King’s pencil!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

This week’s MARVEL LEGACY #1 quite literally went all the way back to the beginning of the Marvel Universe by showcasing an ancient version of the Avengers, but it also utilized a storytelling format that nods back to the roots of Marvel as a publisher: the anthology! Comics with multiple stories stood as the standard for quite a while during the Golden Age.

Take the 1941 book ALL-WINNERS COMICS for instance. You could have walked into the local purveyor of funny books, dropped a dime on the counter and walked away with five stories all within two covers. Better yet? Those stories featured creative legends like Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Joe Simon, Carl Burgos, Bill Everett, and more!

Though the book would eventually give birth to a team of the same name—the All-Winners Squad—the earlier issues brought them together on the covers and then showcased the characters individually inside. Still, seeing the likes of Captain America, Sub-Mariner, Human Torch, Bucky, The Angel, and Black Marvel on the front would have been a huge draw.

For their part, Simon and Kirby focused on Captain America and Bucky in their contributions to the first two issues of the quarterly series. In #1, the duo created a story called “Captain America and the Case Of The Hollow Men,” which pulled out all the stops and started with an image of Cap leaping to fight a giant zombie attacking soldiers. We then jumped back in time to show a hooded figure commanding another zombie to attack a police officer. After succeeding at the nefarious task, the leader radioed Adolph Hitler and told him his undead could be hired out for jobs at a million bucks a pop! The Furher agreed and commanded him to take out some British ships.

All-Winners Comics (1941) #1

All-Winners Comics (1941) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Luckily for our allies across the pond, Steve Rogers and Bucky Barnes had lookout duty by the docks back in the Bowery. They used their guns to try and stop a small army of torch-bearing zombies to no avail. As the mindless monsters boarded the ships, our heroes changed into their fighting togs and got down to business, but still couldn’t stop the fire from taking care of the boat.

Eventually, the shield-slinger realized that whoever created the zombies must have been recruiting them from the Bowery. He and Bucky went undercover and soon found themselves on the way to the villain’s lair. The merchant of death then showed off his macabre work and explained that he drained people of their blood, and then injected them with a chemical that would make them impervious for 24 hours. With all the information they needed, the two true patriots knocked the zombie maker around, destroying the equipment in the process and then crank called Hitler to show him what for!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

Read More

Jack and Stan Lee pit Captain America against The Red Skull once again!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

In 1968, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby broke the Sentinel of Liberty out of TALES OF SUSPENSE and finally gave him back a solo book starting with CAPTAIN AMERICA #100. That first issue wrapped up a story that had begun in the previous book, but #101 launched the series’ first multi-part adventure, which revolved around Cap tracking down Nazis like Werner von Krimm, otherwise known as the Butcher of Lichtengarten, and punching their faces in! To the shield slinger’s shock, Nick Fury popped up during the fracas and helped the Nazi leave the scene. The head of S.H.I.E.L.D., of course, had a plan: he’d placed a tracer on Von Klimm and sent him on his way so that they could figure out who he really worked for.

The big boss turned out to be none other than The Red Skull, who needed Von Klimm to deliver the key that would help him awaken The Fourth Sleeper. Back in TALES OF SUSPENSE #7274, we saw that the crimson war criminal had hidden three other such machines, but hoped this one would prove more successful than the previous trio.

After explaining how he escaped his apparent death in the pages of TALES OF SUSPENSE #91, Red Skull had to wait for Von Klimm to arrive. He didn’t realize that Cap followed the villain in an experimental flying saucer provided by Fury. Soon shot down, the Avenger jumped right into action, but the Skull’s agents got the drop on him.

Captain America (1968) #101

Captain America (1968) #101

  • Published: May 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Red Skull held the Soni-Crystal, which responded to his mind, as the guards brought their captive into the stronghold. Chaos erupted as The Fourth Sleeper awoke and immediately displayed its ability to control its own density. Cap took advantage to escape his immediate captors and then learned from the Skull that this Sleeper had the added ability to explode, potentially taking the world with it! As the first issue ended, the Sleeper exhibited its massive power by first blowing up the Skull’s secret base and then sending explosions up the coast. Though it seemed like he couldn’t have possibly survived, Rogers came out with both his life and the key!

In CAPTAIN AMERICA #102, our hero reunited with Nick Fury and got outfitted to take on the Sleeper. In addition to taking out a gang of assassins who tried ambushing him right after he left his S.H.I.E.L.D. briefing, Cap also reunited with Agent Carter who now found herself tasked with helping him on his mission. Meanwhile, Red Skull revealed that he also had an army of followers called Exiles who had been training on an island since the end of World War II. He used these agents to try and stop Cap and Agent 13 from halting the engine of destruction, but the duo bested them.

Finally, as The Fourth Sleeper appeared out of nowhere thanks to its atomic control of itself, Cap handed the key to Carter and threw himself in the robotic creature’s path. Carter’s intense feelings for Rogers filtered through the key and wound up completely dissipating it! Ultimately, this story filled with classic Kirby and Lee storytelling and visuals ended on a positive note thanks to their belief that love could conquer mindless evil, even the kind that threatened the very existence of the planet!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

Read More