T'Challa goes on a talk show with the Avengers and fights in the Evolutionary War!

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen again this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

After joining with Earth’s champions to welcome a newly intelligent Hulk into their ranks in INCREDIBLE HULK #279, the Black Panther answered Wonder Man’s call to join him, the Beast, Hawkeye, and the Black Widow for an appearance on a late-night TV talk show in AVENGERS #239. Unfortunately, the studio came under fire from a nerdy, would-be villain who monopolized the show and the Avengers’ time. The Panther then spent some time off the radar, though he did pop up on television screens, alongside the Human Torch, in a battle against the Crimson Dynamo in MARVEL TEAM-UP ANNUAL #7.

Avengers (1963) #239

Avengers (1963) #239

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Some time later, T’Challa stood ready to aide his fellow Avengers when long-time member Quicksilver’s duplicity became evident in WEST COAST AVENGERS ANNUAL #1, and fought alongside them against the speedster’s robotic Zodiac gang. Traveling back to New York, the Panther faced off against the Man Without Fear in DAREDEVIL #245 when a down-on-his-luck Wakandan fell into a life of crime and into the hero’s crosshairs.

Back in Wakanda, T’Challa entertained deposed Latverian monarch Doctor Doom in FANTASTIC FOUR #311, and held off an attack by the doctor’s political rival Kristoff in FANTASTIC FOUR #312. Afterward, the Black Panther sprang to the aid of Captain America and a small army of allies in CAPTAIN AMERICA #342 versus the wily Viper and her Serpent Society.

Fantastic Four (1961) #311

Fantastic Four (1961) #311

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When the Panther spirit that gave T’Challa his abilities learned of rampant apartheid in neighboring Azania, it fled the king in BLACK PANTHER #1 (the kick off of a four-issue limited series) and inhabited an Azanian rebel to create Man-Cat. The blame for Man-Cat’s vicious attacks in the small nation fell on the Panther, but he found himself busy fighting the white-power Supremacists in BLACK PANTHER #2, sent by an Azanian general.

T’Challa flew to Azania in BLACK PANTHER #3 to divert a nuclear missile there aimed at Wakanda, then defeated Man-Cat in BLACK PANTHER #4 to clear his name and help Azania begin the process of breaking down their system of apartheid.

During the “Evolutionary War” event, an attempt by the High Evolutionary and his Gatherers to steal Vibranium from Wakanada led to Black Panther teaming with his Avengers allies again in WEST COAST AVENGERS ANNUAL #3.

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T'Challa proves his worth to the Avengers, teams with Daredevil, and more!

For more than 50 years, the Black Panther has stood at the forefront on the Marvel Universe. With T’Challa appearing on the big screen this year in both Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War,” take a look back at over five decades worth of comic book adventures for the King of Wakanda!

The big day arrived for the Wasp and Yellowjacket in AVENGERS #60, a wedding witnessed by the Black Panther, who also took part in the simultaneous battle against party crasher the Ringmaster and his Circus of Crime.

T’Challa teamed with the Vision to confront the giant Ymir in Wakanda in AVENGERS #61, a ploy by the devilish Asmodeus to sew chaos throughout the world. Later, the Panther invited all of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes to his country in AVENGERS #62, but M’Baku the Man-Ape chose that occasion to attempt a coup and destroy his rival.

The Avengers held a wake for a seemingly dead Captain America in CAPTAIN AMERICA #113, but when they later learned of his return in CAPTAIN AMERICA #114, the Black Panther decided to allow the famous hero his privacy. T’Challa also aided Daredevil at this time, in DAREDEVIL #52, when the Man Without Fear suffered from radiation poisoning and had his hands full with the problem of Starr Saxon.

Avengers (1963) #62

Avengers (1963) #62

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Mislead by the villainous Egghead in AVENGERS #63, the Panther raced out with his teammates to rescue the Black Widow while back at headquarters Hawkeye fashioned himself into the new Goliath. Egghead’s scheme led to a confrontation aboard his space station in AVENGERS #64, and a bout with the Swordsman in AVENGERS #65.

After a short break, the Black Panther returned to help the team track down a revived Ultron in AVENGERS #68, then worked to convince them to back Kang in the Grandmaster’s Game of the Galaxies in AVENGERS #69. This led to a sprawling fight with the Squadron Sinister in AVENGERS #70, and T’Challa, the Vision, and Yellowjacket being transported by Kang back to 1942 for a scuffle with Captain America, Namor the Sub-Mariner, and the original Human Torch in AVENGERS #72.

Shortly after returning to the present, T’Challa encountered a singer who was under attack in AVENGERS #73, and asked his fellow heroes to allow him to battle the bigoted Sons of the Serpent on his own. After his capture by the Sons, the Panther chafed under his imprisonment in AVENGERS #74 while an imposter Black Panther confused the public and Earth’s Mightiest Heroes.

Quicksilver returned in AVENGERS #75 to inform the team of his sister Wanda’s abduction to Polemachus, the other-dimensional home of Arkon. The Avengers and T’Challa made their way to Polemachus in AVENGERS #76 to confront Arkon, but the wily ruler traveled to Earth in retreat and suffered his defeat there.

While the team struggled with the wicked Cornelius Van Lunt, T’Challa took on a new identity in AVENGERS #77, that of “Luke Charles,” a high school teacher. He joined with his fellow Avengers again in INCREDIBLE HULK #128 to attempt to capture the Hulk with a Gammatron Bombarder.

Daredevil (1964) #69

Daredevil (1964) #69

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Captain America made his way back to Avengers Mansion in AVENGERS #78, only to be waylaid by the Black Panther’s old foe the Man-Ape. When the villain challenged T’Challa to single combat, the fight ushered in the Lethal Legion, a collection of crooks with beefs against the heroes. In AVENGERS #79, the Avengers defeated their opponents and also learned new information of the Vision’s creation.

A new incarnation of the Native American hero Red Wolf debuted in AVENGERS #80 to warn the group about a new scheme by Cornelius Van Lunt. The Black Panther returned to his teaching job and opened up an investigation into the Thunderbolt gang, which led to a team-up with the Man Without Fear in DAREDEVIL #69. When the Zodiac captured the Avengers in AVENGERS #81, it fell to T’Challa and Daredevil to rescue them in AVENGERS #82.

When all seemed quiet afterward, the mystical Enchantress disguised herself as Valkyrie and commanded a team of female warriors to battle the Black Panther and the Avengers in AVENGERS #83.

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The son of Mephisto challenges his first heroic foil in Daredevil!

Every Friday we use the powers of Marvel Unlimited to look back at the very first appearance of a major character, place, or object that made waves this week.

Sam Wilson just can’t seem to catch a break. First he had to deal with bigots and nuts during his tenure as Captain America, then he thought Steve Rogers turned evil during Secret Empire and now Blackheart’s trying to destroy him in Chicago. With Mephisto’s son causing all kinds of problems for the FALCON star, it’s time to look back at his first appearance in 1989’s DAREDEVIL #270 by writer Ann Nocenti and artist John Romita Jr.!

Blackheart sprang up in the modern era when a couple snuck onto the hill and the man attacked the woman. The newly formed demon lashed out, destroying both before a brief meeting with his father. Mephisto appeared to offer his offspring some advice after making him look more human: “You must walk among men in this form, for the eyes of men diminish evil. If too many see your true form, you lose power.” As the devilish dad disappeared, he offered one more pearl of wisdom: “When you see a worthy foe, you may reveal your true self.”

A few pages later, the humanized form of Blackheart laid eyes on Daredevil leaping around an abandoned amusement park. Sensing a worthy foe, the villain changed back to his real form and attacked ol’ Horn Head. Thanks to his advanced senses, our hero dodged the initial attack. Nearby, Peter Parker found himself sitting on a bus returning from a trip when he saw smoke rising from the old park. Spider Sense a-tingling, he swung into action, knocking the creature away from DD right before a potentially catastrophic blow. However, Blackheart’s physical attacks acted to mask his real intention of corrupting the goodness in Matt Murdock’s heart.

Daredevil (1964) #270

Daredevil (1964) #270

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The do-gooders used their combined might as well as the disposable roller coasters around them to try and stop Blackheart, but didn’t do much aside from draw a crowd. However, that proved exactly the right move as their foe remembered his father’s words about familiarity diminishing evil’s power and used a distraction to return to a more human form and escape—but not before Daredevil recognized the stink of Mephisto on the departing demon.

Blackheart returned in DAREDEVIL #278282, a story that found DD helping Black Bolt find his son, but ultimately lead into Hell and a confrontation with Mephisto. Since then, the villain has popped up in a variety of books ranging from GHOST RIDER and X-FORCE to WONDER MAN and now FALCON.

Flash Forward

For a character without a plethora of appearances in comics, Blackheart’s done a great job of getting his name out there in other formats. Many people first heard of him when he appeared as a playable character in 1995’s arcade-turned-console classic “Marvel Super Heroes.” Mephisto’s bouncing baby boy would go on to appear in crossover games like “Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter” and “Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes.” You may have also seen him on the big screen portrayed by Wes Bentley in “Ghost Rider”!

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Frank Miller sends The Punisher on a Daredevil date with destiny!

Get fired up for the November 17 debut of “Marvel’s The Punisher” on Netflix by exploring some of Frank Castle’s darkest, deadliest moments.

Having started his legendary DAREDEVIL run with issue #158, Frank Miller first introduced The Punisher to the Man Without Fear in issues #181-#184. Joined by creative duo Klaus Janson and Roger McKenzie, Frank Castle only appeared on one page of DAREDEVIL #181 before jumping into the story in earnest with issue #182.

Daredevil (1964) #181

Daredevil (1964) #181

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Both he and Bullseye sat behind bars on Ryker’s Island, though Bullseye managed to break out—and ended up killing Elektra in the same issue. By the time issue #182 rolled around, Castle had an escape arranged so that he could disrupt a major narcotics shipment on Long Island. In an operation that now seems commonplace to PUNISHER readers, he brutally—and systematically—took out the drug runner’s guards, tossing out lines like, “This is war. I don’t take prisoners.”

The script, however, got flipped on Frank when he realized that his targets actually enlisted children to do their dirty work—and that his supposed liberator wanted to either kill him or send him back to jail.

Daredevil (1964) #182

Daredevil (1964) #182

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Later, as Castle hunted down another drug ring, Daredevil appeared—and stopped The Punisher from killing an accomplice. Face-to-face at last, they ran their separate ways when gunshots rang out. Castle’s penchant for killing didn’t sit well with Matt Murdock, who began searching for the assassin.

Daredevil tracked The Punisher down on a rooftop as the former military man tortured a junkie for information on a drug dealer. Frank attempted to make an ally of the sightless her, but his efforts failed and they quickly leapt into battle. During the fight, Punisher shot the Horn Head with a tranquilizer dart…and then proceeded to kill the junkie. Castle’s continued search for the dealer led him to another fight with Murdock, this time resulting in Daredevil shooting Frank in the shoulder! One win each.

Daredevil (1964) #183

Daredevil (1964) #183

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Daredevil and The Punisher, two very different sides of the same coin, have teamed-up, toiled, and tussled with each other ever since.

War Journal

More recently, in writer Ed Brubaker and artist Michael Lark’s run on DAREDEVIL, Frank Castle found himself in prison thanks to Matt Murdock—though not for the reasons one might think.

Murdock himself had been locked up because everyone thought he was Daredevil, and—aware that the streets would always be safer if the Man Without Fear patrolled them, The Punisher allowed himself to be captured and sent to the same jail. Once inside, the duo made it look like Castle took Murdock captive before they escaped together in a helicopter.

Next week, check back for a look at the 1986 PUNISHER five issue limited series by Steven Grant, Mike Zeck, Jo Duffy, and Mike Vos!

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Jack lends a hand and some layouts to a newcomer named John Romita!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

For its first year, DAREDEVIL featured a true who’s who of comic book art talent working off of writer Stan Lee’s scripts. Bill Everett launched the series with Joe Orlando, Wally Wood, and Bob Powell following. Then in issue #12, everything changed. That’s the first time an artist by the name of John Romita drew ol’ Horn Head, but he didn’t tackle the Man Without Fear alone. He had help in the form of layouts from none other than Jack Kirby!

“The King” had provided a number of covers for the book, but only worked on interiors for #12 and #13. In those issues, Lee and Kirby introduced Matt Murdock to a character they debuted over in the pages of UNCANNY X-MEN #10, Ka-Zar!

The blind lawyer from Hell’s Kitchen needed some time away from Karen Page and Foggy Nelson, so he booked a cruise, but lost track of time and needed to zip across town as Daredevil to catch the ship! Once on board, Matt heard a fellow passenger ask about a pirate called The Plunderer who, as you probably guessed, attacked the vessel not long after. Daredevil sprang into action, but ultimately got captured by the villain whose operation proved far more sophisticated than expected.

Meanwhile, Ka-Zar found himself a bit bored and lonely in the Savage Land after enjoying the X-Men’s recent visit. However, a group of Swamp Men sailing downriver towards Skull Island quickly garnered his attention. As it happened, Plunderer intended to visit Skull Island as well, which brought all of our players onto the same stage. A battle quickly broke out as Ka-Zar attacked the interlopers. Though they fought, the lord of the Savage Land decided to save the unconscious man in red because he struggled so valiantly.

Daredevil (1964) #12

Daredevil (1964) #12

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Ka-Zar searched for aid for Daredevil while the latter rested in a cave. However, his recuperation process came to a quick halt when an Ape Man attacked. Around that same time, The Plunderer and his crew found DD, and Ka-Zar returned. With everyone together, Plunderer revealed a shocking truth: he and Ka-Zar both had pieces of a medallion which marked them as brothers! With Ka-Zar distracted, Plunderer’s men captured him. Later, the pirate told Daredevil that their dad, Lord Plunder, discovered Vibranium and built a huge vault out of the metal that could only be opened by the combined medallions.

Plunderer then dropped DD down into Ka-Zar’s cell and tried pitting the two fighters against each other once again. They didn’t fall for it and soon broke out, carrying on into the next issue, which Romita handled on his own. Romita would go on to draw several more issues of DAREDEVIL before moving over to another little title called AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. His Man Without Fear replacement proved another legend-in-the-making: Gene Colan!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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Take aim at the man who never misses with a look back at his debut against Daredevil!

Every Friday we use the powers of Marvel Unlimited to look back at the very first appearance of a major character, place or object that made waves this week.

One of Marvel’s most menacing villains made history this week by headlining his first ever ongoing series. That’s right, with BULLSEYE #1, the man with impeccable aim jumped onto shelves thanks to Ed Brisson, Marv Wolfman, Guillermo Sanna, and Alec Morgan. As Bullseye heads down to South America for some fiendish fun and frolic, let’s look back to his very first appearance back in 1976’s DAREDEVIL #131 by Wolfman, Bob Brown and Klaus Janson.

The initial weapon wielded by the master assassin might strike you as a surprise: Bullseye’s first ever attack comes in the form of a paper airplane thrown perfectly through a high-rise window with a simple message: “Pay me $100,000 or I will kill you!!” The man on the other side of the divide, Mr. Hunnicutt, proves unlucky as he looks up to see the masked killer standing before him. With the unfortunate Hunnicutt having no money on hand, Bullseye picked up a pen from his office set and threw it into the poor guy’s neck! As we learn, the villain never had any intention of actually letting his victim live, instead intending only to bolster his murderous reputation.

Daredevil shows up to investigate and runs into a Daily Bugle reporter named Jake Conover who shares some information on the new assassin that came directly from the seeming psycho’s mouth. Turns out the unnamed man served in Vietnam where he not only relished killing the enemy but also discovered a talent for using throwing weapons. As a signed major league baseball pitcher, he could have returned after the war to that career, but instead moved to Africa where he became a mercenary.

On his way home from meeting with Conover, Daredevil finds himself in the blast zone of a lobbed grenade that sends him tumbling down into an alley where his assailant waits. Bullseye runs, DD giving chase only to wind up in another trap set at a circus!

The tale carries over into DAREDEVIL #132 where the actual big top battle takes place. Thanks to the explosion, the Man Without Fear suffers a series of other injuries that put him off his game. Unimpressed with his opponent’s skills, Bullseye escapes after blasting a pool of water with his special gun’s sonic cartridge.

Far from finished, Bullseye finds another target: a rich couple named Henry and Freda Foster. Using the same gun from before, he shoots a harpoon through the window that staples Henry’s arm to the wall. Doing his usual shtick of demanding money, Bullseye gives the Fosters a day to get the cash but warns them against calling the cops. When Henry does, he gets a sword through the hand.
2a50456465808c5f9d8683e0674889ea

At that same moment, Daredevil bursts into the room and takes on Bullseye at full power for the very first time. The assassin attempts to use everything from another pen to an umbrella to take out the hero, but ol’ Horn Head walks away the victor!

Not a fan of being bested, Bullseye continues to appear and becomes one of Daredevil’s most infamous enemies. Not long after this first appearance, he first tries to assassinate Matt Murdock and Foggy Nelson and later kidnaps Matt’s girlfriend the Black Widow. Of course, he’s most well known as the man who murdered not one, but two of Murdock’s loves: Elektra and Karen Page.

Flash Forward

When it comes to deadly dynamos in the Marvel Universe, few have caused as much damage as Bullseye, but even he’s played at being a good guy. In addition to chasing down rogue heroes during Civil War as a member of the Thunderbolts, he also became Norman Osborn’s Hawkeye in the group known as the Dark Avengers. Even when trying to do good things like stopping a malfunctioning Hulkbuster or stopping three guys from attacking a woman, his temper and disregard for innocent civilians usually led to death. In other words, being anything close to a good guy might be the thing that Bullseye couldn’t hit if his life depended on it.

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Recalling the fiercest fights between the Man Without Fear and the assassin who never misses!

Some enemies will be forever entwined. They have fought so long, harmed each other in so many ways, that neither will ever truly be free of the other. The history of their antagonism ends up written on one another’s skin, in each bruise, burn, and scar.

Daredevil and Bullseye have this kind of relationship; this hard earned, long tended hatred.

And now…Bullseye returns. With DAREDEVIL #15, due out January 11, 2017, the Man Who Never Misses has Hornhead in his sights once again. Before the loud crack of a gunshot echoes through that book’s pages, we look back on how things got this bad.

Daredevil (1964) #131

Daredevil (1964) #131

  • Published: March 10, 1976
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Klaus Janson, Bob Brown
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The Birth of Antagonism (DAREDEVIL #131-132)
In the midst of investigating a dubious real estate mogul who turns out to be none other than his girlfriend Heather Glenn’s dad, Daredevil runs aground of a wildly gifted assassin anxious to be known by the world. That hired killer quickly stands revealed as none other than Bullseye.

Bullseye quickly makes his mark—literally and figuratively—on Daredevil by drubbing the Man without Fear. Round two goes to DD, establishing both their evenly matched skillsets and creating the basis of what will quickly grow to an all-out hate fest.

Daredevil (1964) #169

Daredevil (1964) #169

  • Published: March 10, 1981
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Writer: Frank Miller
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Bullseye Finds His Boss (DAREDEVIL #169-172)
The arc begins with a Bullseye fighting a losing battle against a brain tumor causing him to hallucinate that everyone around him is the hated, humiliating Hornhead. Leaving a pile of bodies on Manhattan’s city streets nets him enough attention to get the surgery he needs, but, alas, it does not end the assassin’s terrible threat.

Still driven by a desire to be recognized for his horrible gifts, Bullseye seeks out The Kingpin and earns a slot as the big man’s most reliable and dangerous freelancer, sealing the trio’s unbreakable cycle of fighting and destroying one another over and over again.

Daredevil (1964) #181

Daredevil (1964) #181

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They May Be Good, but Him? He’s Magic (DAREDEVIL #181)
One of the most iconic images of the Marvel Universe—Elektra impaled on her own sai as wielded by Bullseye—occurred in this very issue.

Taking their conflict to the next level, the assassin seeks not to hurt Daredevil physically, but psychologically by killing DD’s recently returned former lover—and his own chief rival for the position of Kingpin’s right hand enforcer. It all works better than Bullseye expects as the Man Without Fear savagely hunts him down and leaves him crippled by issue’s end.

Daredevil (1964) #191

Daredevil (1964) #191

  • Published: February 10, 1983
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Writer: Frank Miller
  • Cover Artist: Frank Miller
What is Marvel Unlimited?
No Bullets Left (DAREDEVIL #191)
10 issues later, Bullseye remains in a hospital bed, in a coma. Daredevil cannot let the man who killed Elektra recover in peace, however, and breaks into the room one night to engage in a “conversation” with his nemesis and to play a game—Russian Roulette specifically—with his “captive” audience. A chamber piece that proves comics can do knuckle whitening tension like no one’s business.

Identity Swap (DAREDEVIL #284-290)
After months fighting to get himself back to mental and physical heath and return to NYC, Matthew Murdock ends up with amnesia almost the minute he enters the Big Apple. Bullseye, meanwhile, realizes Daredevil has not been seen within Manhattan in some time and decides to buy himself a DD costume and have some fun.

What follows involves a quest for identity for both hero and villain that culminates in the two, wearing the other’s distinctive costume, fighting each other in the boxing ring of Matt’s father’s old training gym, with victory going to Daredevil, certainly—but which one?

Daredevil (1998) #49

Daredevil (1998) #49

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Going “Hardcore” (DAREDEVIL #46-50)
In what might be the fastest head to head in their history, Bullseye returns to New York and to his old job as Kingpin’s chief hitman only to find Daredevil in a very different mindset than ever before. Showing up to threaten Milla Donovan, the villain encounters a DD more than ready for him. Hornhead batters the assassin without hesitation and then signs his work, defacing Bullseye’s new head tattoo as his carves his prone nemesis’s forehead with a shard of glass.

Daredevil (1998) #86

Daredevil (1998) #86

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A Real Riot (DAREDEVIL #86)
The FBI send Daredevil and Kingpin to the same jail. Then, they thought, “not volatile enough,” and ship Bullseye there as well—with corrupt agents slipping him a pack of cards to really stir the pot.

Unsurprisingly, soon after the Man Who Can’t Miss arrives, the prison explodes in a riot. DD and Kingpin, both well aware they have been set up for death, combine their efforts to survive and escape. When Bullseye joins them, however, it proves a step too far. Risking his own life, Matt fights the assassin amidst the chaos.

Shadowland (2010) #4

Shadowland (2010) #4

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Crossing the Line (SHADOWLAND #1-5)
It seemed inevitable. Someday one would kill the other. But no one quite expected it like this.

Daredevil, now the leader of the Hand and effectively the ruler of Hell’s Kitchen, faced off on a rooftop against Bullseye who had just blown up an entire apartment building to get DD’s attention. Hornhead’s nickname, however, has become far more literal and the assassin has no clue. Possessed by the Beast— the demon the Hand worships—the Man Without Fear has stopped being a man at all. And so, he no longer has his morality, meaning when he gets the upper hand, he does not capture Bullseye. He murders him.

Daredevil (2011) #27

Daredevil (2011) #27

  • Published: June 26, 2013
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: December 23, 2013
  • Rating: Rated T+
  • Writer: Mark Waid
  • Penciler: Jock
  • Cover Artist: Jock
What is Marvel Unlimited?
The Manipulator Revealed (DAREDEVIL #24-27)
Someone has been working against DD behind the shadows, almost entirely without the hero’s knowledge. That mysterious figure? Bullseye.

No longer dead but trapped in an iron lung with nearly no senses thanks to a botched Hand ritual, Bullseye has done what he does best. No longer able to grab or use anything, he still remains able to make anything into his weapon and this time, that means using simply his mind.

Check in for the next installment of the Daredevil-Bullseye rivalry in DAREDEVIL #15, coming your way on January 11!

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T'Challa teams with Daredevil once more to clean up the streets!

Read through some of T’Challa’s most thrilling adventures on Marvel Unlimited to mark Black Panther’s 50th anniversary!

Black Panther and Daredevil just make sense as super hero pals. Both have enhanced senses and run around fighting injustice wearing monochromatic costumes. They even both sport flourishes on their masks to reflect their heroic monikers!

So, it came as no real surprise when T’Challa appeared in various DAREDEVIL comics over the years. We saw the first meet-up in DAREDEVIL #52 with the second team-up in 1970’s issue #69 by Roy Thomas and Gene Colan.

This time around, Black Panther showed up while DD stood in the middle of a case involving a street gang called the Thunderbolts. In a warehouse raid, a young man named Lonnie ended up getting hurt, so Daredevil rushed him to the hospital just after Black Panther appeared.

Daredevil (1964) #69

Daredevil (1964) #69

What is Marvel Unlimited?

After stabilizing the boy and calling the best surgeon, the two heroes ascended to the roof where T’Challa explained that a “teacher friend”—really his own secret identity as Harlem school teacher Luke Charles—told him of a student named Lonnie excited to have his brother Billy back from Vietnam. Unfortunately for them both, the Thunderbolts intended to bring him into their family, with force if necessary.

Though Lonnie’s surgery went off without a hitch, the doctor noted that the boy seemed to lack the will to live. Black Panther conferred with Daredevil that Lonnie felt dejected and disillusioned after he saw that Billy had joined up with the T-Bolts!

To help the young man, the heroes leaped out to take on the gang together. Billy happened to be there too, but surprised everyone at the end by revealing that he’d gone to the District Attorney to gather evidence for them against the Thunderbolts! He rushed right over to the hospital where Lonnie popped back to life after realizing that his brother still stood on the side of the good guys!

Secrets of Wakanda 

As we mentioned when discussing DAREDEVIL #52, Black Panther followed the book’s star to make sure he didn’t need back-up while dealing with Starr Saxon. In the process, he deduced Matt Murdock and Daredevil to be the same man. In issue #69, T’Challa revealed this knowledge to the man in red and even took his own mask off at the end of the story.

Get back to the international action with Christopher Priest’s run on BLACK PANTHER from #18-25 with artists like Kyle Hotz, Sal Velluto and M.D. Bright.

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While trying to track down a fellow Avenger, T'Challa gets caught up in the search for Daredevil!

Read through some of T’Challa’s most thrilling adventures on Marvel Unlimited to mark Black Panther’s 50th anniversary!

One of the reasons Marvel fandom became so dedicated and ravenous in the 60’s and 70’s revolved around the shared nature of the universe, especially in New York City. The Fantastic Four might take off for an adventure in their own series and then be seen flying overhead in an issue of AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. Or, while the Avengers search for a missing teammate, one of them would take a brief detour to help save a previously unmet fellow hero.

That’s the case with Black Panther in 1969’s DAREDEVIL #52 by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith. At the time, T’Challa served with the Avengers and the group wanted to find the missing Hawkeye, but as the Wakandan searched New York, some police stopped him, mistaking him for Daredevil in the night. They informed him that the Man Without Fear might suffer from a fatal malady, so Black Panther took a detour to scour the city and find the red-clad hero.

Unbeknownst to T’Challa, Matt Murdock intended to give up his Daredevil identity, going so far as to pretend that his non-existent twin brother Mike actually filled out the costume and recently died. However, with Starr Saxon threatening to hurt Karen Page while also revealing the hero’s true identity to her, Matt decided to don the threads once again.

Daredevil (1964) #52

Daredevil (1964) #52

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Before he can do that that, the nearly delirious blind lawyer from Hell’s Kitchen knocked Black Panther unconscious, assuming his intentions to be less than pure. Undeterred, T’Challa gives chase, following Matt back to his apartment where Saxon holds Karen. Black Panther jumped in to save her life followed soon by Daredevil.

Saxon made a break for it and Daredevil told Panther he had it covered, but the Avenger elected to keep an eye on his new ally. Though DD proved more than capable of handling Saxon on his own, his actions proved T’Challa’s theory that he and Murdock remained one and the same. Our hero also watched as Daredevil lets Saxon go thanks to a lack of proof of any criminal activity. The Panther soon took his own leave vowing not to add to the hero’s baggage by revealing that he too knew the secret of Matt’s other identity.

Black Panther and Daredevil continued to cross paths over the years, but none more so than just a few years back when the latter asked the former to cover Hell’s Kitchen for him after the events of Shadowland.

Secrets of Wakanda

As an on-again, off-again member of the Avengers, T’Challa holds the distinction of being the first person of color to earn the title of team chairman. Back in the mid-60’s the team cycled through leaders, called the chairman, every month as a way to keep the group more well-rounded and not put too much responsibility on any one member. Black Panther acts as chairman in AVENGERS #63 when he orders Hawkeye to stay back at headquarters while the rest of them look for Black Widow. Not one to follow commands, the archer dons one of Hank Pym’s old Goliath suits, downs a new growth serum, and heads out to find the Widow without his teammates knowing. Black Panther searches for him in DAREDEVIL #52, but the heroes return to base in AVENGERS #64. Unperturbed by Clint Barton’s brashness, Black Panther refocuses the team on their next target: a satellite blowing up midwestern towns.

Next, Jack Kirby returns to the character he created by launching the very first BLACK PANTHER series in 1977.

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One super soldier battles another as Cap lends Daredevil a helping hand!

Every day we celebrate Captain America’s 75th anniversary by looking deep into the Marvel Unlimited archives and going through some of Steve Rogers’ most thrilling adventures. Happy diamond anniversary Sentinel of Liberty!

They say that old soldiers never die, they just fade away. When it comes to super soldiers though, the options seem a bit more diverse. In the pages of DAREDEVIL #233, two stand on display: Captain America and Nuke.

Part of Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli’s epic “Born Again” story, Nuke hits New York City hired by Wilson Fisk to take out Matt Murdock. In DAREDEVIL #232, readers meet the maniacal pill-popping soldier as he takes out an entire village in Nicaragua all by himself. The man originally known as Frank Simpson soon launches a similar attack in Manhattan that garners the attention of Daredevil.

Matt does his best to fight Nuke, but finds himself outmatched. He also discovers that there’s more to him than simple muscle and bone. Soon enough, the mass destruction draws the attention of Thor, Iron Man, and Captain America who easily put a stop to the rampage.

With Nuke locked up, though, Captain America feels the need to look into this man even further because they both wear the flag. Of course, both also appear to have been enhanced by their own governments to fight for the military.

Daredevil (1964) #233

Daredevil (1964) #233

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Thanks to some hacking, Steve discovers that Simpson’s abilities came as a result of Operation: Rebirth, the exact same initiative that lead to the Super-Solder Serum. The experiments took on 20 candidates, but only Frank survived.

Nuke busts out of his confinement and goes toe to toe with Cap one more time, but loses. Instead of turning him in to his creators, Cap and Daredevil take the science experiment over to Ben Urich at the Daily Bugle.

Once again, Steve Rogers proves how special and unique he is without even meaning to. That particular man from that particular time happened to have the persistence to continue trying to defend his country along with the right physiology to take on the Serum. All of that shines through as we see Nuke furiously fight while a variety of different superiors pull his strings and mess with his head. You just know that Steve Rogers wouldn’t let that happen to him and tries to stop it from happening to Nuke even more.

Cap Declassified

Nuke stays out of commission for quite a while before returning to the comic page in WOLVERINE ORIGINS by Daniel Way and Steve Dillon. The government sends Nuke to take out Wolverine, but Cap shows up to stop the mutant from killing his hunter. Since then, the now cybernetically enhanced soldier has shown up as Scourge in THUNDERBOLTS and even took on Cap again during Rick Remender’s run when the Iron Nail waged war against the hero.

Next, CAPTAIN AMERICA #250 asks the questions: why doesn’t someone who loves his country as much as Steve Rogers run for president?

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