Charles Soule addresses Kingpin’s campaign for Mayor of New York City!

Talk about your eye-opening moments: Wilson Fisk—the infamous Kingpin—wins the office of Mayor of New York City and Daredevil’s powerless from stopping his old enemy from running roughshod over the town he loves…right? We checked in with writer Charles Soule to see if good things truly can happen to bad people in DAREDEVIL #595—coming November 8—or if Mayor Fisk has to be blind not to see what problems the Man Without Fear can cause him.

Marvel.com: So, Charles, can you fight City Hall in the Marvel Universe?

Charles Soule: If anyone might have a chance, it’s Daredevil, aka New York District Attorney Matt Murdock. After all, he’s armed with more than just his incredible fighting skills and enhanced senses—he has what might be the strongest power of all: a thorough understanding of the legal system. That’s not to say it’ll be easy, of course—the Mayor’s office is incredibly powerful in New York City, with city agencies at its beck and call—including, of course, the NYPD. Should be a hell of a fight.

Marvel.com: To say the least! But where’s Matt’s head at as he goes into this storyline? What’s he dealing with that might complicate his approach to the Fisk administration?

Charles Soule: Matt feels, to a degree, like his city has gone insane. Either that, or much more likely, Kingpin pulled one of his trademark shenanigans and rigged the system somehow. In either case, the place he’s sworn to protect has turned against him in some ways, and he’s having a hard time understanding or dealing with it. Plus, of course, Wilson Fisk knows that the costumed heroes are a huge threat to his plans, and he’ll take immediate steps to shut them down. Should be amazing.

Beyond that, we’ll have the return of a new character I introduced back in DAREDEVIL#11,  Muse, the serial killer artist who made Murdock’s life—and that of his apprentice Sam Chung, aka the young hero Blindspot—extremely complicated a little while back. Muse alone is almost impossible to handle, and when you add the Kingpin on top of it…it’ll be something.

Marvel.com: What exactly is Fisk’s single greatest qualification for being mayor of a major metropolitan city?

Charles Soule: As he tells the city in his campaign: he loves New York as much as anyone can, and he has a clear vision for improving it. Now, the question is whether the Kingpin’s city is the city New Yorkers would want. We know it’s definitely not what Daredevil wants.

Marvel.com: So, you’re sort of saying if he weren’t a criminal, Fisk might in reality become a good mayor?

Charles Soule: That’s something we’ll definitely be exploring. Just because The Kingpin is a crime lord doesn’t mean he doesn’t know how to run a city. In fact, it might be exactly the opposite. It’ll be fun to explore.

Marvel.com: What are Matt’s greatest risks in opposing Fisk right now? Does he care what anyone in the city actually thinks of him?

Charles Soule: The biggest issue, really, is that to fight Fisk, Daredevil will have to fight the city itself, a place he loves and thought he understood. Not anymore. It’s very complicated for him morally and logistically, and he’ll have to figure out how he fits into this new puzzle. Things he took for granted, like the cops turning a blind eye—heh—to his activities, might not be so easily assumed anymore.

Marvel.com: What will New York’s criminal element do with this new status quo, in general?

Charles Soule: I’d say they’re pretty excited. One of their own has ascended to the big chair, you know? New York City’s their playground.

Marvel.com: Lastly, how its feel for you to go back to the original numbering with this issue?

Charles Soule: It’s always felt amazing to be part of the incredible Daredevil legacy, and returning to the original numbering with DAREDEVIL #595 cements that for me even more. Not only that, but I get to write DAREDEVIL #600! That will be an incredible issue; the culmination of the “Mayor Fisk story, with twists and turns I’ve been building to forever. I’m very excited for everyone to see where this is all going.

Hop on the campaign trail with Charles Soule and artist Stefano Landini with DAREDEVIL #595, arriving November 8!

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Artist Stefando Landini helps inaugurate Kingpin for Marvel Legacy!

Marvel Legacy promises to get hallmark characters back to their roots. For Matt Murdock that means a familiar red costume drawn by new DAREDEVIL artist Stefano Landini and a plot by The Kingpin to become mayor of New York City developed by series writer Charles Soule, all kicking off with issue #595 on November 8.

The Man Without Fear races around the Big Apple trying to figure out the best way to discredit the man he knows to be a scheming murderer, even as the public can’t seem to get enough of Wilson Fisk after all the good he did during Secret Empire. Even worse? DD’s wanted by the law!

We talked with Landini about working with Soule, keeping Daredevil’s look classic, and his particular inspirations for Kingpin.

Marvel.com: How has it been getting to work with Charles on this series he’s been helming for a while now?

Stefano Landini: When Marvel offered me to work on DAREDEVIL, I was very excited, but when I found out that Charles was going to write it, I was dumbstruck! I admire his work and love his writing, so for me, working with him is much more than a beautiful experience, it’s more like a little dream come true.

Marvel.com: Daredevil has a classic and sleek costume. Is it difficult putting your own spin on a look like that?

Stefano Landini: Concerning Daredevil’s costume, I wanted to do something traditional. I didn’t add anything. I love the original costumes of super heroes and when I read in the script that the costume had to be the old one, I immediately decided to avoid any personal addition. I hope people will like it. For me, this old version of Daredevil is among my favorites.

Marvel.com: Kingpin’s always been interesting from a physical perspective because he’s so large, but also so strong and fast. How has it been conveying his physicality so far?

Stefano Landini: For Kingpin, as a reference I used [Vincent] D’Onofrio, the actor portraying him in the [Netflix “Marvel’s Daredevil” TV] series, because I think he’s perfect for the part. I only changed the proportions of his body. As you say, he’s a giant in the comics, so I preferred to make him bigger, but still with realistic proportions.

Marvel.com: How do you enjoy working on the scenes of Matt outside of his hero identity, including the ones in the courtroom?

Stefano Landini: As for now I haven’t done many scenes in the court yet—I’m starting with the third [issue] right now—but drawing Matt is really great. I want to characterize him in a cool way, studying his behavior as well as his movements, and anything else that distinguishes him from other heroes. These are the things I enjoy the most while drawing him.

Stefano Landini helps Charles Soule put Matt Murdock to the test in DAREDEVIL #595 on November 8!

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Discussing Daredevil’s Legacy with writer Charles Soule!

When it comes to the world of Matt Murdock, justice is blind. And for the last 53 years, that particular form of law has set him and his alter ego, Daredevil, apart from all other heroes in the Marvel Universe. But what happens when his life of sightless vigilantism can’t transition into legitimate authority?

Wilson Fisk runs the show in New York City in a typically sinister—but completely legal—way, which leaves Matt looking to get creative to bring down The Kingpin. And on November 8, the age of Marvel Legacy begins with scholarly scribe Charles Soule and artist Stefano Landini’s DAREDEVIL #595!

With Daredevil’s legacy of justice on the brink of disarray, we spoke with Soule about the upcoming issues and how he’d like to be remembered for his contributions to the classic character.

Marvel.com: How does the Marvel Legacy banner inform this new story? 

Charles Soule: My run so far has really been all about Matt Murdock’s legacy as a super hero. He knows he can’t be Daredevil forever, so he’s been trying to do something to make his city better permanently—whether he’s wearing the horns or not. In other words, he’s trying to leave a legacy. That extends to Blindspot, it extends to the law he’s trying to put in place during the Supreme storyline, and more. The Legacy story I’m telling—“Mayor Fisk”—is where we see whether he can make that happen, or if it will all blow away in the wind.

Marvel.com: In a sentence or two, what would you say is Daredevil’s legacy within the Marvel Universe? 

Charles Soule: Daredevil is all about resolve. His powers are sort of limited compared to some of the other marquee heroes, but it never stops him. He’ll do what has to be done in the pursuit of justice, and I think the other heroes see that.

Marvel.com: Getting into the story a bit, what can we expect NYC to look like under the control of Wilson Fisk? 

Charles Soule: It’s pretty cool stuff. Fisk has been in control of the criminal machinery of the city before, but here, he runs the legitimate side as well. So, in essence, the entire NYPD works for him—not to mention everything else in the city. Fisk can do whatever he wants without fear of reprisal, and he absolutely sees the possibilities in that. Daredevil does too, of course, and it terrifies him.

Marvel.com: What shortcomings do Matt’s abilities have against this threat—and what new strategies will he use to circumvent those shortcomings? 

Charles Soule: It’s mostly what I mentioned—Fisk is legit, which means Daredevil…isn’t. Matt Murdock has always been able to rely on his city as a safe haven, of sorts, but now it’s turned against him. It gets pretty dire for ol’ Hornhead, but I don’t think we’d want it any other way.

Marvel.com: What do you hope your own legacy to be when it comes to DAREDEVIL comics? 

Charles Soule: When you’re talking about “legacy,” it doesn’t get much more relevant than this title—with both the creative teams that have worked on the character and the stories themselves, DAREDEVIL is all about legacy. I think DD has more legendary runs than just about any other character in super hero comics.

My goal has always been to really try to stand alongside the earlier stories with my run—to not be a blip between otherwise memorable chapters in the life of Matt Murdock. I’d like to add things, and take things away, and write my DAREDEVIL—to do things that later readers can point to as signature elements of this period for the character. We’ll see!

DAREDEVIL #595, by Charles Soule and artist Stefano Landini, drops on November 8!

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Writer-artist Chip Zdarsky breaks down the special variant series!

Evoking what was once a standard of comics past, a collection of How-To-Draw variant covers will be available across 20 different issues this October—including BLACK PANTHER #166, CAPTAIN MARVEL #125, ALL-NEW GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #11, DAREDEVIL #27, and GWENPOOL #21!

Via the artistic tutelage of Chip Zdarsky (writer of PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN, STAR-LORD, and HOWARD THE DUCK), readers will get a step-by-step guide to illustrating their favorite characters. How “expert” that artistic tutelage will be…is less certain.

We sat down with Chip and Editor Nick Lowe to chat about how these covers came to life.

Marvel.com: Nick, when was the first time you ever came across a how-to-draw featurette in a comic—and what did it mean to you? And then how did this project come about?

Nick Lowe: The book How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way was huge for me back in middle school and high school—and still is today. Let’s be honest: John Buscema is one of the most underrated artists in comic history. He could draw anything and you’d hear these amazing stories about him, but you see how he approached the work and it’s just stunning.

We generally do Sketch Variant covers for our big launches and when PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN came around, it hit me that we could do something a little different…especially with someone as truly bizarre as Chip, our writer. So I emailed Chip and before I knew it he sent in the hilarious How-To-Draw Spider-Man cover. [Editor-in-Chief] Axel Alonso saw it and loved it and he had the idea to roll it out into all these variants.

Marvel.com: Chip, what did you think when they approached you about this?

Chip Zdarsky: Well, like Nick says, we were gearing up for issue one of Peter Parker and, you know, launching a Spider-Man book is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, so I told Nick that I’d love to do one of the variant covers.

Marvel.com: Nick, what made Chip the go-to man for these covers? What are his strengths with this kind of work?

Nick Lowe: He’s a very troubled individual, so I knew I could exploit those troubles here. His strengths certainly aren’t art, that’s for sure, but I guess he’s pretty funny.

Marvel.com: Chip, there’s got to be more to this story. What do you remember about the Spidey editorial team’s reaction to your interest in doing a variant for the book?

Chip Zdarsky:  Never heard back. Which, you know, stung, since they had 80-90 variants for issue one. But, I forgave Nick, ‘cause he’s a really busy guy, spending most of his day telling me “no” to my story ideas. So it probably slipped his mind to tell me “no” for my variant.

Then, just before they were sending the covers to the printer, Nick contacted me. He said they were doing one of the blank sketch variants, but that I could maybe write a fun little thing on the back cover before they sent it to the printer. Was it out of pity for me? Probably. Would I exploit that pity? Yeah. Yeah, I would.

So I sent him a How-To-Draw guide for Spidey instead. It seemed to fit in with the theme of the blank covers. Nick loved it and told me I’m his favorite person at Marvel; more than Mark Waid, Dan Slott, his assistant editors Alison and Devin, etc., which was really nice to hear.

So, the Spider-Man cover came out, and people seemed to like it! I figured at that point Marvel would greenlight a How-To-Draw movie and I’d be set for life. But instead, I got a text message from Axel Alonso, Editor-in-Chief—I call those Axts—telling me that I was now drawing twenty of those covers.

Marvel.com: Nick, do you have a favorite cover?

Nick Lowe:  I love the Lockjaw one a lot. I love the DAREDEVIL one, too. But they’re all so great.

Marvel.com: Chip, do you have a personal favorite?

Chip Zdarsky: I’m pretty happy with the DAREDEVIL one, which has made its way online already. But so far my favorite is the PUNISHER one, ’cause it’s really tricky to capture the soul of a killing machine. But I think I succeeded.

Marvel.com: How long did a typical cover take you to create from beginning to end?

Chip Zdarsky: In a lot of ways, my entire life has been leading to this job, so I would say each one takes a lifetime. Or, like, half an hour. Depending on how you look at it.

Marvel.com: Nick, any chance that something like this could be expanded upon in the future?

Nick Lowe: I sure hope so! I think they’re so fun and I can’t wait for a generation of burgeoning artists to be led down the wrong path! These are the complete inversion of my beloved How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way!

Marvel.com: We’ll give the last words on these variants to the writer-artist—Chip, given a hypothetical chance to do more of these, which other characters would you love to do?

Chip Zdarsky: [Redacted], I guess.

Marvel.com: *sigh*

Keep an eye out for Chip Zdarsky’s How-To-Draw variant covers in stores this October!

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Charles Soule guides the Man Without Fear through the legal system!

It may be a cliché that not all heroes wear capes, but can super heroes still be champions for good when they’re not running around in costume saving the day? That’s exactly what Matt Murdock seeks to prove in the upcoming “Supreme” arc of DAREDEVIL from writer Charles Soule. He’s foregoing the usual red, skin tight number in favor of a simple suit and tie as part of a plan to take care of crime in New York with the legitimate fists of the legal system.

However, Matt’s tour de force of lawyerly prowess could prove to be the undoing of not only the bad guys, but all of New York’s vigilantes as well. Even his recently recovered secret identity stands at stake in this story, which promises to be an explosive courtroom drama chock full of surprises, exciting cameos, and homages to classic sitcom tropes.

Since Charles practices as an attorney, we asked him to make a few opening statements on behalf of “Supreme.” He’s far from resting his case, your honor. In fact, it’s just waking up.

Marvel.com: In this story arc, Matt has a plan to take care of crime in Manhattan via the legal system as opposed to his vigilante work as Daredevil. As a practicing lawyer and fellow Columbia Law graduate, were the specifics for this arc drawn from your own experiences as an attorney? If so, can you go into detail about your inspirations without breaching attorney-client privilege?

Charles Soule: I’ve been building to this story since I first started thinking about my run [on DAREDEVIL]. This has been what it’s all been about, from the start. This is why Matt joined the DA’s office, it’s what he decided to do with his secret identity, all of it. He has a plan based on a particular area of criminal law that I came up with when I was doing my initial research, talking to people who’ve worked in the Manhattan DA’s office, etc. The funny thing—while I am a practicing attorney, I don’t work in this particular area, and so I am sure I’m screwing stuff up as far as the specifics. That’s okay, though, I have a wonderful crutch to rely on for that stuff: “Law is a little different in the Marvel Universe.”

Marvel.com: Are there any holdover repercussions from the “Purple” arc that centers around Matt trying to hold onto his secret identity?

Charles Soule: The whole “Supreme” arc is all about it. We learned in “Purple” what Matt did to put his identity as Daredevil back in the bottle, and in “Supreme” all of that is put at risk. We understand the stakes.

Marvel.com: What is the climate like in New York City to allow Matt to take this route rather than just beat the snot out of bad guys as Daredevil?

Charles Soule: Beating up bad guys is great, but it’s a one-at-a-time sort of solution. Every once in a while maybe you can take down a big player like an Owl or even a Kingpin, but just because you beat someone up doesn’t mean they will actually get convicted of a crime and go to prison. Matt’s plan here is designed to bring his vigilante work and his legal work closer together—and not just for him, but for everyone like him. The Spider-Mans, the Blindspots, the Ms. Marvels— everyone with a secret identity working in New York as a vigilante could be affected by what he’s doing.



Marvel.com:  Moreover, how does he feel about the possibility that the city may not need the hero after this case is over?

Charles Soule: He’s not worried about that at all. New York will always need heroes.

Marvel.com:  The criminal underworld can’t be happy about this trial. What action will they be taking to stop Matt?

Charles Soule: Stay tuned. That’s a huge part of the story. We’ll see some great bad guy appearances here, including the return of a fun Z-lister from the 90s, another long-demanded character from my SHE-HULK run with Javier Pulido, and another massive Daredevil bad guy I haven’t used yet.

Marvel.com: The irony of Daredevil needing to take the stand and testify is a bit of a two-dates-to-the-prom—or courtroom in this case—situation for Matt. How will he go about handling that particular dilemma?

Charles Soule: That’s issue #22—and man, it’s fun to write that stuff. Classic silly sitcom with super heroes material.

Marvel.com: Luke Cage and Echo will be guest starring in this arc. What will their roles be in this case? Will they be taking to the stand and should we prepare for any other cameos?

Charles Soule: They show up early, but we shift away from them to allow for some other folks to appear. I’m trying to get in a bunch of cool cameos here; don’t want to spoil it, but I had Daredevil appear in a big three-part story in my SHE-HULK run. It might be time to return that favor…

Charles Soule kicks off “Supreme” in DAREDEVIL #21, coming this June!

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Charles Soule examines what has dissolved the bond between Matt Murdock and Foggy Nelson!

Super heroes need friends, it’s as simple as that. Fighting for ideals is nice, but fighting for those you care about is better. You can beat up as many villains as you like, expose their crimes and put them in jail, but you need someone there at the end of the day who will kick back with you at Josie’s for a couple of pints.

At the moment, the friendship of Matt Murdock and Foggy Nelson lies on the rocks in the current “Purple” story arc for DAREDEVIL written by Charles Soule with art from Ron Garney. Yes, Matt has his secret identity back, but how did he achieve such a feat and will it prove worth it if his once best friend Foggy doesn’t have his back? As the arbitrator between the two parties, Charles gave us his hot take on the frail friendship and the delicate secrets threatening to tear it apart forever.

Marvel.com: We’re currently in the middle of the four-part “Purple” arc where we’re dealing with the idea of Matt Murdock restoring his secret identity and the return of a classic Marvel villain in Zebediah Killgrave aka Purple Man. And that’s not even mentioning the bounty on Daredevil’s head in the “Seventh Day” arc. With all this going on, what are the ripple effects being felt on Matt and Foggy’s friendship?

Charles Soule: The “Purple” arc is designed to pull back the curtain on why Matt’s made a lot of his recent choices; not only does it explain how he got his secret identity back, but it tells you what he decided to do with it. From Murdock’s perspective, a secret identity is a tool: it’s the first time he’s been able to work full on as an attorney in a while without people knowing that he’s also Daredevil—years, really—and he’s going to use that to its fullest extent. Unfortunately, Matt’s choices also caused him and Foggy Nelson to go “on a break”—they’ve interacted a bit in the 20 or so issues of my run so far, but it hasn’t been the full-on friendship they’re known for. Things seem very strained, very tense. It’s a shame!

Marvel.com: In anticipation of issue #19 coming April 19, can you give any hints as to what caused a rift between Matt and his best friend?

Charles Soule: Well, the real explanation comes in issue #20, but honestly, the pieces have been there since issue #1. Matt has his secret ID back and Foggy doesn’t like something about the way it happened, or what Matt’s decided to do since he got it back. Foggy’s the only person in the world who knows the truth, and he doesn’t know that he’s too excited about carrying that burden. But more to come on that…

Marvel.com: Are they coming at it from a lawyerly perspective or is emotion clouding their otherwise rational minds?

Charles Soule: This one’s 100% emotion, despite what they tell themselves. Matt Murdock is a big rationalizer; after all, the fact that he’s Daredevil at all requires being able to jump through some pretty big moral hoops, especially while being a lawyer at the same time. As an attorney myself, that was always one of the things I found most interesting about Daredevil as a character. A lawyer really can’t do what Daredevil does, not ethically—and Matt certainly knows that—but he does it anyway, because he’s compelled to. That’s great stuff.

Marvel.com: There’s no doubt that these are trying times for both Matt Murdock and his vigilante persona. It sure would help to have a friend around, but he’s out of luck. How is Matt handling things without this extra support and comfort from Foggy? In other words, what does it mean to be strained?

Charles Soule: I think we’ve seen it all through the run so far. On the surface, everything seems “fine”—Matt’s being heroic, stopping bad guys, all of that. But if you look a little deeper, the man’s barely holding it together. He can’t do it alone, but he thinks he can—also great for drama. This tension has brought him back to the Catholic Church, though, which was a nice thing to be able to return to the Daredevil mix. I always thought it was interesting that Murdock had a strong religious faith as part of his character, and it’s been a little missing from his portrayals recently. The church isn’t a substitute for a best friend, though.

Marvel.com: What is more important to Matt, saving his secret identity or his friendship?

Charles Soule: I think we’re about to find out…

Get the next hints on Matt’s secret identity and friendship woes when DAREDEVIL #19 by Charles Soule and Ron Garney hits on April 19!

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Charles Soule speaks on the dangers of being Matt Murdock’s friend!

The only thing more dangerous than being the Man Without Fear himself might just be being his friend.

All signs point to Blindspot learning this lesson in DAREDEVIL #14, the shocking climax to the “Dark Arts” storyline—on sale December 14—that has pitted DD and his mentee against the deadly art obsessed Muse. Before we see how that event unfolds, writer Charles Soule discussed the friends and lovers who have come before and suffered for their connection to Matt Murdock.

Ben Urich
“I think he keeps Matt honest,” the writer suggests. “One of the first people he ever trusted with his secret identity, and he showed himself time and time again that he was worthy of that trust. Murdock knows that if Daredevil ever crosses the line, that Ben Urich will make sure the world knows it—and that’s a good thing.”

Foggy Nelson
“The best friend, for every reason in the world,” asserts Soule. “He’s as much of a hero as Daredevil is, which is even more impressive, considering he does it without ninja skills or hyper-senses. I hope these two can work out their current differences.”

Karen Page
“Tragic,” the writer laments. “I hated the way she went out in ‘Guardian Devil’—not that it was badly done, it just made me react so strongly; I hated it but I loved it. And poor Matt, he’ll never be over Karen.”

Milla Donovan
“Such an inspired creation by [Brian] Bendis and [Alex] Maleev,” enthuses Soule. “Milla suffered a bit—well, a lot—from her close association with Matt, but their brief marriage was a brilliantly-written and drawn chapter in Daredevil’s saga, and I could absolutely see her coming back again someday.”

Daredevil (2015) #13

Daredevil (2015) #13

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Heather Glenn
“Man, running through Daredevil’s romantic interests really starts to be a litany of doom, doesn’t it?” Soules observes.

Black Widow
“I love Natasha, and she is very high on my list of characters to include in my DAREDEVIL run,” the writer reveals. “I know exactly where she’ll show up, too. Such a cool lady, and her own tragic past makes her a great complement to Murdock.”

Kirsten McDuffie
“Kirsten is awesome—one of my favorite things about Mark Waid’s run with Chris Samnee, Paolo Rivera and the other amazing artists he worked with,” confesses the writer. “She seemed great for Matt, but she seems to be out of his life. I wonder how that happened? Find out in DAREDEVIL #17-20, coming soon!”

Stick
“The one and only,” states Soule. “There is no Daredevil without Stick—although sometimes I’m sure Matt wishes he’d never met him. Recreating that terrible dynamic Murdock had with his original teacher was part of why I decided to create Blindspot.”

Blindspot
“The latest addition to Daredevil’s world,” the writer explains. “He’s a young man—about 19—trying to do what he can to protect his own immigrant community in Chinatown. He’s brilliant, skilled and self-aware, but he’s in [Daredevil]’s world now, which can be dark, dangerous. I have big plans for [him] and how he’ll connect to [the] larger story, but first he may have to live through a story of his own.”

Find out the fate of Blindspot in DAREDEVIL #14 by Charles Soule and Ron Garney, available December 14!

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Charles Soule leads Matt Murdock down a dark path!

Lawyer by day, hero by night. For many readers, these roles define both Matt Murdock and his Daredevil persona. Since his move back to the East Coast under writer Charles Soule and artist Ron Garney’s tenure on DAREDEVIL, however, the scarlet defender can add a new title to his illustrious resume: teacher.

Over the years, Daredevil patrolled the streets and rooftops of NYC on his own, but under the All New, All Different direction of Soule and Garney, the Man Without Fear brought a new sidekick along for the ride in Blindspot, which no doubt brings a host of new challenges to the hero of Hell’s Kitchen.

We sat down to talk with series scribe Soule about the direction he and Garney took Daredevil upon relaunching the series and where they’ll be heading as Marvel NOW! gets underway.

Marvel.com: Charles, we all know you practice law in addition to writing numerous comics. I assume it was only a matter of time before you came to DAREDEVIL. As you move toward the end of your first year on the title, what surprised you about writing “The Man Without Fear”?

Charles Soule: Well, I never like to think of it as inevitable that I’d be on this title. It’s definitely a dream come true, but I still feel very lucky to be writing Matt Murdock’s adventures for a while. As far as surprises—the truth is that I thought the book would be more legal than it actually is. I haven’t written a big legal procedural yet in the title. The law is a huge backdrop, especially with Matt’s new job in the Manhattan DA’s office, but I haven’t shined a huge spotlight on it yet. That’s coming, though; if you’re waiting with bated breath for a big Matt Murdock court scene…it’s coming!

Marvel.com: In many regards, your run brings Daredevil back to his roots following the time spent on the West Coast. Fighting crime by day in the district attorney’s office and by night as a super hero, readers find Matt Murdock back where they knew him best. We’re also seeing old enemies return like the Hand.

Why did you find it necessary to reset the game board, if you will, with your run?

Charles Soule: I think one of the great things about Marvel’s cast of characters is that by and large, they’re very flexible, and each new creative team gets to reinvent them through their own lens. I loved the run that preceded mine, with incredible work from Mark Waid, Chris Samnee, Paolo Rivera, Marcos Martin, Matt Wilson, and their other collaborators, but I wanted to put a different stamp on things. A big key for that was returning Matt’s secret identity. Once that was back in the bottle, many other things became possible.

Marvel.com: On the other hand, Matt’s always worked in an independent law practice and now we see him as an agent of the government. He was always an independent super hero, but now he has Blindspot as a sort of sidekick. What was your thinking behind these shifts?

Charles Soule: I don’t think Matt sees himself as an agent of the government; more an agent of the law, which, in a way, transcends governments. Governments are subject to the laws they enact—no one is above them. For Matt, working as a prosecutor is just about making the world safer by night and by day; it made sense to him, after everything he’s been through recently. It’s also possible that there’s a big plan behind his work in the DA’s office…but time will tell.

As far as Blindspot, I wanted to redefine Matt a little, and seeing him as a teacher, in the “Stick” role, felt fresh and new to me. Plus, it lets me introduce a really cool new character to the Daredevil family. Blindspot—Samuel Chung—is one of my favorite creations of my career, and I’ve got some very interesting twists and turns planned for him. He’ll be a big part of the story going forward. I actually saw my first cosplay of Blindspot not long ago; as any creator will tell you, there’s no rush quite like that.

Marvel.com: This month also sees DAREDEVIL kick off its next story arc, “Dark Art,” where we’ll encounter a serial killer intent on turning his victims into works of art. Although DAREDEVIL has a history of going into dark places, this seems pretty heavy stuff, no? What drew you down this dark path?

Charles Soule: I think there are very few super hero comics where themes like this can be explored, but DAREDEVIL is definitely one of them. I’ve had the idea of the main villain of this arc—a new guy named Muse—in my head for a long time. He’s an artist, and feels that any hurt or harm he causes in the world is justified as long as it’s done in the service of creating his pieces. I think that’s a real danger for artists/creators, and I wanted to explore it. Obviously, Muse is a metaphor for the way some artists approach their lives, but I think we’ve gotten some rich storytelling out of it. And man, he looks cool; Ron Garney and Matt Milla outdid themselves there.

Marvel.com: Of course, we’ll be launching Marvel NOW! this fall, which will take place in the midst of the “Dark Art” storyline. How do you see this arc fitting within the greater publisher-wide initiative?

Charles Soule: Marvel NOW! is all about introducing new characters and ideas, and redefining existing characters in new ways. “Dark Art” is all about that: we get an amazing new bad guy, and things really take a turn for both Blindspot and Daredevil. Many, many things get launched from this arc—not to be missed.

Marvel.com: As we wrap up here, what has you most excited about DAREDEVIL in the months leading up to, during, and after Marvel NOW! kickoff?

Charles Soule: I have to say, it’s been amazing to work with Ron, Matt and the other artists who have been helping me bring this new chapter in Daredevil’s story to life. Matteo Buffagni, Goran Sudzuka, Lee Bermejo, Clayton Cowles, and many others are making Daredevil’s streets pulse with the darkness and neon that make them feel alive. I can write a scene, fine, I’m happy with it…but then when I see what these guys do—it’s magic, every time. I’m also just thrilled that I get to be a steward of DAREDEVIL for a while. We’re building to something huge, and I think long-time and new readers will be pretty excited when the pieces start to come together.

Get the latest on Marvel NOW! via Marvel.com and our social channels!

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Ron Garney embraces the darkness and takes Matt Murdock to hell and back artistically!

Matt Murdock makes his triumphant return to comic shops this week with a brand new series offering readers a mix of old and new elements to absorb. While the super powered lawyer from the Big Apple will continue to fight the good fight in DAREDEVIL, he now works as a district attorney, rocks a darker costume, and hangs out with a new crew including a sidekick.

Written by Charles Soule and drawn by Ron Garney, the All-New, All-Different ongoing series offers plenty of opportunities for the creative team to leave their mark on ol’ Hornhead. We talked with Garney about Matt’s new looks both in and out of costume, his supporting cast, and the importance of Hell’s Kitchen.

Marvel.com: What is it about the Hell’s Kitchen locale that works so well with this character?

Ron Garney: Well, obviously the devil belongs in hell, right? But, I think deeper than that, it’s that in these darker places Daredevil—like justice in the fact that he’s blind—sees more complex forms of humanity and his environment and that gives him an edge physically even with his radar vision.

Hell is a place where truth is the outcast and that sort of character acts as a beacon of light in a world of deceit and darkness. It’s perfect for someone with DD/Matt’s convictions. Now we get to explore that same sort of motif in Chinatown, where our story currently takes place. Lots of black and white and grays, with dots of neon and chiaroscuro to give the reader a sense of what DD may experience “visually.”

Marvel.com: Would you say that Matt’s new job changed how you draw him when out of costume?

Ron Garney: Well not really, Matt is Matt.  I mean, I doubt becoming a prosecutor will influence his choice in ties too much. Or maybe it will…hmm. I’m sure there’s an idea there somewhere, thanks!

Marvel.com: The new series includes a new supporting cast, a new costume, and a new sidekick. How does it feel to add so many new elements to the Daredevil mythos?

Ron Garney: Feels great. It affords me the opportunity to carve uniqueness into the DD mythos without it being just another version of something that came before it. Hopefully fans will regard and remember it that way as well.

Marvel.com: Daredevil has been everything from a swashbuckling rogue to the head of the Hand. What previous elements of his look were you looking to incorporate into this new series and costume?

Ron Garney: I think sticking to basics sometimes is best. I think veering off for something colorful and fun like swashbuckling is great, but we want to be able to trust in Matt’s character in the long run. He doesn’t suffer identity issues for the sake of new readers in my opinion. Who he is ultimately and visually, I wanted it to be simple, dark, and effective so we can focus on Matt’s abilities. Becoming a prosecutor now brings a more aggressive energy to those darker forces he must confront and his costume translates that.

Marvel.com: Speaking of the costume, what was the process like for designing it? Was the initial idea to switch it to black or did that come from the process?

Ron Garney: It was pretty much that from the get go, but I played around with a dark charcoal with red streamlines to it as well. Ultimately, black worked best for him and his protégé.

Marvel.com: Speaking of Samuel, aka Blindspot, how did you come up with his costumed look?

Ron Garney: He was a character I had played around with in my sketchbook a bit and I thought he would work for Samuel. I don’t normally do that, but this was perfect really. Then communicating with Charles, it evolved into what we have now. I thought it would be cool if he [used] the shadows with fire escape sort of patterns on his costume so that no matter what it would be difficult to follow him in a fight in dark spaces. There’s more that I won’t reveal about him just yet but I think he’s cool as hell.

DAREDEVIL #1 from Charles Soule and Ron Garney swings into action this week.

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Join New York City's finest crime stopper Matt Murdock in an all-new adventure with art by Ron Garney!

He’s back in black and back on his home turf this December. Marvel is pleased to present a look inside DAREDEVIL, the new series from writer Charles Soule and artist Ron Garney!

It’s a new beginning for Matt Murdock in the all-different Marvel Universe. Back in New York City and practicing law in the District Attorney’s office for the first time, Matt’s day job and night job finally align. Fighting crime in the shadows, prosecuting bad guys in the light. It’s a whole new world for the Man Without Fear… including the arrival of a new hero he’s taken under his wing. But who is this new hero and where did he come from? Welcome to Hell, Blindspot. Hope you survive the experience!

Be there as the Man Without Fear charges headlong into the All-New, All-Different Marvel Universe in DAREDEVIL #1!

DAREDEVIL #1 (OCT150751)
Written by CHARLES SOULE
Art & Cover by RON GARNEY
Variant Covers by JOE QUESADA (OCT150756) & TIM SALE (OCT150755)
Action Figure Variant by JOHN TYLER CHRISTOPHER (OCT150752)
Hip-Hop Variant by ALEX MALEEV (OCT150753)
Marvel ’92 Variant by LARRY STROMAN (OCT150754)
Cosplay Variant by PATRICK ‘RICK’ LANCE (OCT150757)
On-Sale – 12/02/15

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