Declan Shalvey explains why two heroes are better in one!

On January 17, Old Man Logan and Wade Wilson have to swallow their pride, put aside their differences, and come together for the greater good. And by “come together,” we mean “literally come together.”

In DEADPOOL VS. OLD MAN LOGAN #4, writer Declan Shalvey and artist Mike Henderson combine the two heroes’ bodies to create a wise-cracking mercenary with an Adamantium skeleton—also known as ‘Poolverine!

We caught up with Shalvey to hear more about this unholy combo.

Marvel.com: What do we need to know ahead of issue #4?

Declan Shalvey: We start off the issue in desperation. While trying to rescue a young mutant girl from a shadowy organization called GenForm, Deadpool and Old Man Logan have been captured. GenForm wants to weaponize the abilities of mutants, and while their target all along has been this new mutant, Maddie, they now find themselves with the fabled Weapon X—the original test subject. Admittedly, he is…a little ripe.

Marvel.com: How did ‘Poolverine come about?

Declan Shalvey: ‘Poolverine is a little nickname for Deadpool’s current state at the beginning of issue #4…if you’ve read issue #3, then you know that Deadpool has escaped from his cell in a very unconventional way.

Maddie has used her teleportation powers out of desperation. She’s always been adamant that she cannot teleport people, so Deadpool suggests she tries teleporting Adamantium. Then Wade uses Old Man Logan’s own claws to come to the rescue.

Marvel.com: Wade and Logan don’t exactly get along, so what can we expect from a team-up as unique as this?

Declan Shalvey: What I like about Deadpool and Old Man Logan is that even when they team-up, they fight. They’re the perfect match for a book like this; both their personalities force them to bump heads constantly. And, because of their abilities, they’re able to literally rip into each other and still walk away. It’s the perfect odd-couple or buddy cop scenario, but with a lot more severed limbs.

Marvel.com: What do you see as their greatest strengths? 

Declan Shalvey: Well, they both have healing factors. They can both take a lot of punishment—from their enemies and from each other! As characters though, while they have their flaws, they both want to do the right thing. Their motivations for helping Maddie may be petty, but they do want to help her. They’ve both lost young girls in their lives—Deadpool missed his daughter’s infancy; Old Man Logan’s young daughter was murdered along with the rest of his family. So they’ve both endured emotional tragedy and physical torture. Both changed, but have come out the other side. They’d never admit it, but they have a lot in common.

Marvel.com: What are their weaknesses? 

Declan Shalvey: Frankly, Deadpool is immature, Old Man Logan is short-tempered, and they’re both as stubborn as each other. It makes for great character work, but it makes it hard for them to achieve their goals.

Marvel.com: How will those factors play into their quest to save Maddie?

Declan Shalvey: The main obstacle for the last few issues has been getting Maddie on board while fending off the GenForm organization. In issue #4, however, we reach a crossroads of sorts, with both Deadpool and Old Man Logan choosing very different tactics to solve the problem.

After the events of this issue, we’re going to see Deadpool and Old Man Logan really bust heads over what to do with Maddie. Their concerns will have proven to be valid, as we also learn a shocking secret—something that will change the entire outcome of this story.

Marvel.com: Describe your favorite scene in issue #4!

Declan Shalvey: Hmm…There’s a double page spread in this issue that I love. And the following page in that scene is a nine panel grid, all of Logan cutting loose. I felt so frustrated writing it because I wished I was drawing it. And, as expected, Mike Henderson killed the scene.

Marvel.com: How has Mike Henderson helped realize your vision?

Declan Shalvey: Issue #4 is where Mike gets to really cut loose, and it’s a joy to behold. We really deliver on the “vs.” premise—we’ve been building to this climax since we started. I’m so delighted with how this limited series has turned out, and I can’t wait for everyone to see what happens next.

Dig your claws into DEADPOOL VS OLD MAN LOGAN #4, by Declan Shalvey and artist Mike Henderson, on January 17!

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Artist Scott Hepburn flashes to the future with Spidey and the Merc!

Big plans have been set in motion for SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL in 2018. On January 10, get a taste of the machinations in store with writer Robbie Thompson and artist Scott Hepburn’s SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #26! Jump into the future as 80-somethings Peter Parker and Wade Wilson realize they live in the same nursing home!

We spoke with Hepburn about moving the book’s stars down the timeline, Deadpool’s old man facial hair, and working with Thompson to bring it all together.

Marvel.com: This issue sounds like a lot of fun. How did you like working with Robbie Thompson to bring it to life?

Scott Hepburn: Robbie is the best. Super nice guy, but more than that, he comes from a TV writing room and encourages input and collaboration. When I met him at [New York Comic Con] for the first time in person, he asked me, “What do you wanna draw?” And that opened up a bunch of ideas for me, which will start to play out in the next few months.

Marvel.com: Spider-Man may be the most iconic Marvel character in existence—so what’d it feel like to figure out his 80 year-old look?

Scott Hepburn: I love character design, so having a chance at creating my own new versions of Spider-Man and Deadpool was very exciting. Editor Nick Lowe mentioned putting Spidey in a wheelchair so that kind of defined him as a more vulnerable, subdued, classic old man.

Marvel.com: And how about Deadpool? How does he look as an octogenarian?

Scott Hepburn: With Deadpool, I thought age would just break down barriers and filters even more. So his outfits and crazy mustache stand as a reflection of that.

Marvel.com: What challenges come from drawing super folks of such an advanced age?

Scott Hepburn: Their age changes everything about them, but “challenge” implies a problem—it’s actually just really fun. Through the story, we learn why Pete is in his chair and why Deadpool has aged so badly, but again, Robbie has made the choices I made integral to the story.

Marvel.com: Are Old Man Parker and Old Man Wilson wearing their classic costumes or did you play with those designs?

Scott Hepburn: My “redesign” of the heroes was simply to put their wrinkly withered old bones into their classic costumes and have the fabric hang off them creating a new silhouette and energy!

Writer Robbie Thompson and artist Scott Hepburn’s SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #26 shuffles its way into the world on January 10!

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Robbie Thompson jumps into the future with Old Man Parker and Old Man Wilson!

The future arrives on January 10, 2018.

Well, obviously, because January 10 exists in the future. But for Deadpool and Spider-Man, the far-flung future arrives on January 10!

In SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #26, writer Robbie Thompson and artist Scott Hepburn send geriatric versions of Peter Parker and Wade Wilson to a nursing home. But Old Man Pete and Old Man Wade won’t spend the issue going to pet therapy and eating soft foods, they (gingerly) jump into action like never before!

Or maybe they just go to pet therapy and eat soft foods. We asked Thompson a few questions to find out more.

Marvel.com: Besides Spider-Man and Deadpool’s ages, how have they changed in the future? How has the world changed around them?

Robbie Thompson: The biggest difference is that Spider-Man and Deadpool are super old! And totally retired! They’ve hung up their web-shooters and katanas and live in a retirement community, playing Bingo and working on their crochet skills. The world has changed because it’s seemingly moved on without these two heroes, but we’ll soon see they’re still needed in a big way!

Marvel.com: Did writing older versions of the characters surprise you in any way?

Robbie Thompson: That’s a great question. I have to admit, when I first pitched the idea, I thought the tone would be much lighter. More of a spoof, really. And there’s still plenty of the type of humor folks have come to expect from this team-up in our future story. But I was surprised to find the scripts were a lot more emotional. Getting to hear these guys talk at the end of their careers proved really fascinating. I also got really inspired by artist Scott Hepburn’s preliminary Old Man Wilson and Old Man Parker designs. They looked super fun and dynamic, but there was so much emotional weight to the faces he created. So much history. So much loss.

I just love these two old farts so much, and can’t wait for people to see them.

Marvel.com: As you mentioned, Scott Hepburn brings the story to life in issue #26. How did he help you realize your vision of the future Marvel Universe? How did his collaboration influence your approach to the story?

Robbie Thompson: Collaborating with Scott on this story has been a big bag of awesome. We’d met socially at a convention, but this is the first time I’ve been lucky enough to collaborate with him. It started with the early designs I mentioned—he just clearly got the heart of the characters and the direction of the story. Then, with each issue he’s really elevated both the characters and the world-building. This future hasn’t necessarily been seen yet and Scott’s built it all from the ground up.

We hung out at NYCC this year and hashed out the details of the third chapter together—he has so many great ideas and put together some incredible character designs for some “future” Marvel characters we’ll be seeing down the road. We’re also collaborating with Ian Herring on colors—I had the great fortune to work with Ian on all of SILK, and his work here with Scott is outstanding.

Marvel.com: This story sets the table for a bigger arcperhaps the biggest arc of the book yet—which arrives in the summer of 2018. What can you tell us about that?

Robbie Thompson: Early on in pitching the book, editors Nick Lowe and Jordan D. White talked about building our first run into a larger story. I don’t know how much I can reveal, but from a plotting standpoint, we wanted to do what Gerry Duggan did in the flagship DEADPOOL book. That team flashed back and revealed untold stories of Deadpool’s past, then brought those stories to the present. In SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL, we’re flashing forward and the events of that book will tie back to our present day story. There’s a “big bad” that brings our heroes out of retirement in the future. The last page of issue #26 reveals our “big bad,” and it’s off to the races from there.

Marvel.com: From a creative standpoint, what appealed to you about the future storyline? What storytelling avenues does it open up to you?

Robbie Thompson: One of the things I found myself most drawn to in pitching on this book was trying to drill down on why Spider-Man and Deadpool are friends. I get why Deadpool loves Spidey—I mean, who doesn’t love Spidey? But Wade can be tough to love—he doesn’t make it easy. And yet, despite it all, Spider-Man does have Deadpool’s back. Joe Kelly and Ed McGuinness created such an emotional story and we really wanted to build on that and test their friendship.

Then, the events of Secret Empire put Spider-Man and Deadpool into an even more emotional space. Peter down on his luck, Deadpool back to being a bad guy. So, in the present, it’s Spider-Man vs. Deadpool. But in the future story, we can see it didn’t all end in tears. And yet, they’re still up to their old bickering. Old Man Wilson and Old Man Parker started as a sillier idea, but the more we started to dig into this future dynamic, the more it felt like we could talk more about the strengths—and weaknesses—of their friendship and tie it all back to the present in an emotional way.

Marvel.com: If a fan dared to skip this issue, what will they be kicking themselves for missing out on?

Robbie Thompson: Who would dare? Who?! It’s Grumpy Old Men with Super Powers! “The Golden Girls” with boys? Uh…“Cocoon” without aliens, uh, but also there’s fighting?

It’s Old Man Wilson and Old Man Parker! ‘Nuff said! Don’t miss it, fam!

Jump through time with Robbie Thompson and artist Scott Hepburn’s SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #26 on January 10!

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Artist Matteo Lolli returns to scratch off Wade Wilson's bucket list!

“Killing Cable”—the murderous first arc of DESPICABLE DEADPOOL—planted a seed in Wade Wilson’s head. And when that seed grew, it became a list of all the people the Merc with a Mouth wants to kill, maim, or generally annoy. Naturally.

On January 10, artist Matteo Lolli joins writer Gerry Duggan to check a few names off DP’s hit list. So who will they be? Stevil Rogers? Rogue? Madcap? And where will Deadpool end up when his affairs have been put in order? Find out as a new storyline begins with part one of “Bucket List” in DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #292!

We caught up with Lolli to get a few answers about what those on Wade’s list might think when the Regenerating Degenerate comes knocking.

Marvel.com: You’ve worked with Gerry many times before on DEADPOOL. How has it felt to get the band back together again for “Bucket List”?

Matteo Lolli: It’s always a pleasure both working on this character and working with Gerry, probably because each time, I discover new layers of personal conflict in Deadpool. And the “Bucket List” story has been no different. When I read the scripts I felt so bad for the poor fella, having to go through all of this because Gerry has no remorse going hard on him. But that’s what a great writer does to write a great story arc. He doesn’t go easy on the main character, and oh boy, Gerry really knows how to do that.

Marvel.com: It sounds like Wade has a hankering to take care of some unfinished business. Would you like to see him cross off any names of characters that you’ve worked on before?

Matteo Lolli: I’m pretty happy because I wanted badly to see the conclusion of the main grudge with Madcap. But I’d really like to see him meet Sabretooth again. I love how they can fight and not hold back in any way.

Marvel.com: How has it been working with characters like Hydra Cap, Rogue, and Madcap in the arc so far?

Matteo Lolli: Simply great. Each one has some deep link with Deadpool and his personal story that makes each of their appearances immediately interesting, even from a creator’s point of view. I really like Rogue’s relationship with Deadpool.

Marvel.com: Bucket lists tend to imply that the list maker might not have a long time left…does that thought weigh on Wade’s mind? Does that change how he behaves at all?

Matteo Lolli: I think he doesn’t care for himself anymore. I see him in a sort of quicksand; the more he tries to get out of it, the more his efforts turn out badly and he ends up going further down. Choosing to hurt someone to save someone else, feeling used, feeling there’s no escape—I think he’s coming to the breaking point. Actually, he seems like such a train wreck that I’ve rarely seen any other character this way before, and that’s what I think is the true tragically beautiful aspect of Deadpool.

Marvel.com: Sounds like Deadpool might also flirt with taking out Apocalypse. How do you go about crafting the image of an iconic villain like that?

Matteo Lolli: I’d fear for the poor Deadpool crossing his path. You know, his mouth moves much faster than his punches. As a comic artist, working on such an iconic villain would be awesome, but also scary and exciting at the same time. I usually feel there’s never enough time to get used to such important characters, but at the same time, the deadlines and excitement make me want to tackle them as soon as possible. In any case, it’s always a blast, so bring it on.

Start the list in DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #292, by writer Gerry Duggan and artist Matteo Lolli, on January 10!

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Scott Koblish on the Merc with a Mouth offing his pseudo-buddy.

On December 13, Deadpool kills Cable. Seriously, we’re talking end of the road, kick the bucket, lights out kind of dead. Sure, Stryfe made him do it, but can you really make Deadpool do something he doesn’t want to? Tune in to find out as writer Gerry Duggan, alongside artist Scott Koblish, reveal all in DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #290.

But wait, this tale packs more than just bestie drama, “I loved when the Dinosaurs poured out and attacked.  I love Dinosaurs,” teases Koblish.

Marvel.com: First off, can you give us the run down on what’s going on in #290?

Scott Koblish: Man, I don’t know if I CAN say what happens in this issue! Gerry, Nick, Joe, Jordan, Annalise, Heather and I worked really hard on this book, and while there are some really intense scenes in this arc, this issue is a particular peak.  It’s not called the DESPICABLE DEADPOOL for nothin’.

Marvel.com: Deadpool seems to jump back and forth across the line separating the morally good and bad. Murdering his buddy is safe to say a bad side move, so how is he dealing with this? Any justification for his actions?

Scott Koblish: You’ll have to make up your own mind if he’s justified in his actions. Wade has to make some really difficult decisions to be made over the next few issues, and even just as reader I am pretty shocked at where Gerry is going with this.

Marvel.com: How would you describe Deadpool and Cable’s relationship?

Scott Koblish: Homicidal.

Marvel.com: What are your 2 or 3 all-time favorite Deadpool and Cable moments, the highest points in their relationship?

Scott Koblish: Each interaction is severely complicated – if I had to pick favorites, I’d say their initial meeting in NEW MUTANTS and killing Hitler.

Marvel.com: What 2 or 3 moments across their relationship stick out to you as particularly gut wrenching, their lowest friendship moments?

Scott Koblish: I kinda feel like it’s NEVER been a good relationship.

Marvel.com: How is the tone of the book translated in the art? 

Scott Koblish: I’ve been working really hard at trying to make the book look as gritty and disturbing – this particular story demanded a rough touch in the art.

DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #290

Marvel.com: Any twists or surprises heading our way that you want to tease?

Scott Koblish: No, too much relies on surprise right now.  Mum’s the word.

Marvel.com: What can we expect for Deadpool moving forward?

Scott Koblish: Awful, awful things.

Catch the final downfall of Deadpool and Cable in DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #290 by writer Gerry Duggan and artist Scott Koblish when it hits shelves on December 13.

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Spider-Man turns over every rock and looks behind every door in SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #24

 

By November 22, Spider-Man has just about run all out of patience. On that day, SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #24 hits stands and the Merc with the Mouth remains out and about. The Wallcrawler cannot take it anymore so he has decided to hunt down his former sorta-kinda partner.

We brainstormed some ideas for ol’ Webhead in the office and ran them by writer Robbie Thompson to see what he thought of them.

Patrol the whole of Manhattan via webswinging

Why it is a good idea:

“Patrol via webswinging is the perfect way to hunt for Deadpool,” agrees Thompson. “Deadpool is noisy, and likely to be less than conspicuous. So Spider-Man can cover much more ground this way, and check every nook and cranny for the Despicable Deadpool.”

Why it is a bad idea:

“What if Deadpool is in Jersey?” he wonders.

File a missing persons report with the NYPD

Why it is a good idea:

“Missing Persons report is a perfect idea,” the writer acknowledges. “Let the NYPD do their due diligence, while Spider-Man can use the free time catch up on Netflix shows.”

Why it is a bad idea:

“The NYPD have more important things to do, Spider-Man!” shouts Thompson. “Get off the couch and find this maniac!”

Consult one of Manhattan’s numerous psychics

Why it is a good idea:

“It can’t hurt,” shrugs the writer. “Plus, maybe they’ll give Spider-Man some winning lotto numbers. He could use the cash after his company went bust. Maybe just head straight to Dr. Strange’s and get this sorted straight away.”

Why it is a bad idea:

“What if the psychic actually ‘gets in the mind’ of Deadpool?” he says, outlining a worst case scenario. “Might not ever escape that circus.”

Ask Cable. They’re like best friends, right?

Why it is a good idea:

“Cable would definitely be a good resource for finding Deadpool…” nods the writer.

Why it is a bad idea:

“…in many pieces,” he adds.

Read the Daily Bugle’s super hero coverage to see if he’s mentioned

Why it is a good idea:

“The Bugle is the city’s most widely read paper with the best coverage of superheroes…”states Thompson.

Why it is a bad idea:

“…not named Spider-Man,” he continues. “Might be tough on Spider-Man’s ego. But maybe he could take out a ‘Missed Connections’ ad: ‘I was the super-hero, you were the anti-hero. The 7 express train last week. You were doing the Mad Magazine fold-in, I was hunting you down to bring you to justice.’”

Google him. It’s worth a shot.

Why it is a good idea:

“You could find his Facebook or Twitter page,” Thompson points out.

Why it is a bad idea:

“You could find his Facebook or Twitter page,” restates the writer.

Get the Spider-Mobile out of mothballs and take a road trip to try and find him.

Why it is a good idea:

“This is a great idea,” enthuses the writer. “I’m stealing this idea.”

Why it is a bad idea:

“There is no bad to this idea,” Thompson argues. “Hence: stealing it.”

Foster a bloodhound for a weekend, try to get him to pick up Deadpool’s scent

Why it is a good idea:

“Dogs are great trackers and make the best of friends!” the writer explains. “Spider-Man could use some friends right about now.”

Why it is a bad idea:

“Who will walk that poor dog when Spider-Man is not around?” he worries. “Who?! Okay, I’ll do it.”

Canvas the five boroughs with “Have You Seen This Merc” posters

Why it is a good idea:

“Hey, posters work for garage sales, why not finding Deadpool?” admits Thompson.

Why it is a bad idea:

“Wade would constantly call the hotline with false information, sending Spider-Man all over the city/country/world, to the most ridiculous places,” he states.

Reach out to a super hero friend who might be better at this

Why it is a good idea:

“Now this is a great idea which Nick Lowe and Jordan D. White pitched for the first issue we worked on!” reveals the writer. “So you’ll actually see this in SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #23. Spoiler alert: it totally works! Kinda.”

Why it is a bad idea:

“Perfect idea is perfect!” Thompson contends. “It leads to shenanigans and fun and near death experiences! Fun for the whole family!”

SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #24, by Robbie Thompson and artist Chris Bachalo, hits on November 22!

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Declan Shalvey breaks down the Canadian combatants' deadly dynamic!

Everyone’s favorite immortal Marvel characters tear each other to pieces in writer Declan Shalvey and artist Mike Henderson’s limited series DEADPOOL VS. OLD MAN LOGAN!

But the fighting between big mouth Wade Wilson and crotchety old James Howlett only teases at the larger game at play in this five issue event. With a new Omega-level mutant named Maddie on the run, the two heroes will have to fight a mystery organization—and each other—to keep her safe. And on November 15, issue #2 claws deeper into the battle and its surrounding secrets.

We spoke with Declan about writing and drawing comics—and what makes this team-up unlike any other.

Marvel.com: You’ve made the transition from artist to writer for this series. What’s that switch been like?

Declan Shalvey: With writing, I’ve gotten to dip my toe a bit, with the Nick Fury CIVIL WAR II: CHOOSING SIDES serial from last year and the VENOMVERSE story I did this year. In both cases though, I drew those stories as well. Writing an actual Marvel limited series for another artist seemed pretty intimidating, but a challenge I felt up to. I had just written a creator-owned graphic novel for another artist that ended up being roughly the same page count, so between that and the previously mentioned shorts, I think I’d built up enough confidence to do something as ambitious as DEADPOOL VS. OLD MAN LOGAN.

Marvel.com: As an artist, do you automatically illustrate the story in your head while writing a story? If so, does it make writing easier?

Declan Shalvey: In a way—I’ve heard some writers tend to draw layouts when they’re writing, but I feel I have a good sense of how much I can fit into a page as I’m writing. My brain has some visuals in mind, so I’ll structure a lot of the other moments around the bigger moments. Because of that, I know where to dole out the appropriate real estate—I know to have some moments with more space on the page more than others.

I’ve been fortunate to work with Mike Henderson on this project, as I feel we have a large overlap in our visual sensibilities. There’s a few pages that look just like what I had in my head. Others look very different, but in interesting ways that feel very like Mike, so I respect his choices.

As an artist, I have a similar relationship with my colorist Jordie Bellaire. I tell her what I’m thinking and she’ll deliver on that—or do something different that’s better than what I would do. I’ve learned to embrace those opportunities as an artist, so I try do the same with my writing; I leave the artist the space to bring something of their own to the book. It can only result in more good ideas being available.

Deadpool Vs. Old Man Logan (2017) #1

Deadpool Vs. Old Man Logan (2017) #1

Marvel.com: Have you found an element of the writing process that you enjoy more than the illustration process? How about vice versa?

Declan Shalvey: The writing process can be a lot more frustrating than the illustration process…probably because I have so much to learn. But also with illustration, I want to lock everything down before I start drawing in order to be more productive overall. With writing, results end up being more nebulous—it’s harder to pin things down and say they’re “done,” but that’s been the great thing about working with Heather Antos as my Editor. She’s been great to push me to do my best on the book, and to point out where I might need to spend more time developing the story.

I will say that writing takes up a very different part of my brain, so it can be difficult to focus. My natural state has always been drawing—I can pick up a pencil and get to work instinctively. Writing means I have to force myself to sit in the chair more and get words on the page. My favorite part of both disciplines, though, is the problem-solving. Taking words and making them into a visual narrative feels like solving a puzzle that I find very satisfying. Similarly, breaking down a story and figuring out story problems can be hugely rewarding.

Marvel.com: You did the cover art for another “DEADPOOL VS.” series in DEADPOOL VS. THE PUNISHER with Fred Van Lente and Pere Perez. Did drawing the covers for this run feel different since you’re also writing?

Declan Shalvey: The DEADPOOL VS. THE PUNISHER covers got assigned so far ahead of time, I didn’t have much story material to work from so I just had to come up with random visuals to help sell the book. The covers on DEADPOOL VS. OLD MAN LOGAN on the other hand…I had the advantage of knowing all the story…but I don’t want to incorporate too many story elements from the book. I tried to create a more unified design look to the whole series, so it always has the two title characters, generally fighting, with a limited color palette and a strong, bold design approach too.

I didn’t tie in anything about Maddie or the mysterious baddies. I’m hoping every cover of DEADPOOL VS. OLD MAN LOGAN will be recognizable as part of a unique and identifiable limited run. That’s what I tried to do anyway—and again, Editors Heather Antos and Jordan D. White were really accommodating by letting me try to do so.

Marvel.com: It’s so cool to pit two immortal characters against one another. How did you want their invincibility to come across in the story and art?

Declan Shalvey: Oh I just had to try and rip both these guys to pieces; this book allowed us to push things as far as we possibly could. There had to be a “Parental Advisory” tag on this book, otherwise what would be the point in doing it? It’s been brilliant fun to bang these characters heads together…figuratively and literally.

The violence has been a lot of fun to write, and from what I can tell, Mike loves drawing it. Getting to the heart of the matter though—the violence ends up being trivial because both these characters have invincibility. Swords and claws won’t really hurt these two…what really affects them will be mistakes from their past. And the young mutant that they meet in issue #1 brings a lot of that stuff to the surface as the series progresses.

Grab DEADPOOL VS. OLD MAN LOGAN #2, by Declan Shalvey and artist Mike Henderson, on November 15!

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Howard the Duck, Deadpool and Punisher are featured in the new gear.

Rap juggernauts Run The Jewels have just unveiled an expansive collection of goods produced in collaboration with Marvel. The new items reimagine the duo’s iconic imagery in the context of the Marvel Comics universe, including a variety of shirt designs, keychains, and more. The initial items are available at the group’s webstore (runthejewelsstore.com) with some items exclusively available to purchase at stops along Run the Jewels’ ongoing Run The World tour.

For a look at the initial Run the Jewels/Marvel product take a look at the gallery above, which includes items featuring Deadpool, Howard the Duck and the Punisher.

This is not the first time Run the Jewels and Marvel have crossed paths, as the Run the Jewels logo was the inspiration for several Marvel variant covers beginning in 2015, and the duo also appeared on an episode of This Week in Marvel. This year, a Run the Jewels song — “Legend Has It” — was featured in the teaser trailer for Marvel Studios’ Black Panther.

The hip hop phenomenon known as Run the Jewels continues to roll its way into the hearts & minds of fans worldwide. Following the release of their breakthrough new album RTJ3, the duo continue to make a thrilling impact on the landscape of music & culture. From main stage festival heroes to media darlings, groundbreaking artists to digital mavericks, serial entrepreneurs to presidential surrogates, Run the Jewels have arrived. The group just released a new song, “Mean Demeanor” for the FIFA ’18 video game, which is also featured in the TV ad starring Cristiano Ronaldo. Their latest U.S. tour kicked off Oct 5th in Houston, TX, and includes a taping of the legendary ACL TV show.

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Writer Robbie Thompson explores a new dynamic between Spidey and DP!

Fighting with your friends might just be one of the worst feelings in the world. When your pal has the proportional strength and speed of a spider or a nearly unmatched healing factor, well, then things can get really rough.

So it goes in SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #23, due out November 8. Writer Robbie Thompson took a breath to tell us all about the quarrel between these former buddies.

Marvel.com: Despite surviving Arcade’s death traps in SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #22, Peter and Wade are not, shall we say, great at the start of issue #23. What has ruptured their awkward partnership?

Robbie Thompson: Spider-Man and Deadpool’s lives are turned upside down post-Secret Empire. Spider-Man has gone back to basics, and Deadpool is wanted for murder—having killed Agent Coulson at the behest of St-evil Rogers.

When we pick up their story in SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #23, Spider-Man learns that Deadpool is back to putting the “Merc” in the Merc with the Mouth. With S.H.I.E.L.D. no longer around, Deadpool has exploited their absence to the max and become [an] arms dealer.

From his POV, he tried to be a good guy, but it just didn’t take. From Spider-Man’s POV, Deadpool has to be taken in once and for all; he’s gone too far this time and has to pay for what he’s done.

Marvel.com: What does each one want to do to the other? How clearly defined are each’s plan for the other?

Robbie Thompson: For Deadpool, it’s no more Mr. Nice Guy. He’s going back to what he’s always been. And he does not care at all what anyone thinks about his decision…

…with the exception of Spider-Man. Spider-Man gets a pass! But of course, Deadpool has no interest in going to jail.

But jail isn’t all that Spider-Man wants for Deadpool. He wants to bring Deadpool in for all the right reasons, but he also wants to help him. It’s the Deadpool Reclamation Project to Spider-Man.

After everything that went down with Itsy-Bitsy, Spider-Man feels like he owes Deadpool—but he also feels that deep down, Deadpool has the capacity for good. He saw first-hand how good he could be. So, Spider-Man wants to rehab Deadpool…

…no matter how much punching and kicking that will take to make it stick this time.

Marvel.com: Besides one another, what antagonists are bedeviling the bickering duo in this issue?

Robbie Thompson: I don’t want to spoil the end of our second issue, but they will find out that they are both being antagonized by a very familiar villain from Spider-Man’s past, someone they can only stop by teaming up.

Marvel.com: Fights between friends can be no fun, but this book long has an established ability to balance the serious and the humorous. How are you making that balance work? How does new artist Chris Bachalo help you realize both sides of that tone?

Robbie Thompson: A big help in keeping it fun is the new status-quo in each of their main books. [AMAZING SPIDER-MAN writer] Dan Slott and [DEADPOOL writer] Gerry Duggan have done such an amazing job of placing these two in really new and exciting positions in their lives. Deadpool is in a dark place and Spider-Man is in a low point career-wise, and yes, they both have competing agendas in our book, but they’re going to [go] down swinging and quipping the whole way!

Early on, too, editors Nick Lowe and Jordan D. White had a great idea to give Deadpool a supporting cast in this book; he’s stolen a S.H.I.E.L.D. Hellicarrier, and it’s populated with some really bizarre characters from the Marvel Universe that have provided a lot of levity. If you’re a longtime Marvel fan, there will be some familiar faces and some new ones in Deadpool’s motley crew.

But the hero of this book is Chris Bachalo. He’s killing this thing with crazy action and a well-balanced tone. I’m looking at the art for #23 right now and it’s so much awesome! Chris has an amazing eye for design and detail, but what I love about what he’s done in this book is getting the most emotion out of the characters right from the jump. From the first time you see his Peter, you know exactly where Peter’s at in his life and you get a sense of his exasperation and annoyance later on when he’s in the Spidey suit. And it’s the same with Deadpool. He’s also brought our supporting cast to life with great performances, as well as new designs. Tim Townsend is inking and they are an absolute dream team.

Marvel.com: For fans of the duo, how much hope can you give them of these two making amends and reuniting? Is there any chance at all or is the end nigh?

Robbie Thompson: There’s always hope for these two knuckleheads! But it’s going to be a process; Spider-Man’s heart is in the right place, but Deadpool is pretty dug in. They may come to blows, but they’re also going to have to reluctantly team-up to beat a much bigger foe.

See what becomes of this dream team with SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #23, coming your way from writer Robbie Thompson and artist Chris Bachalo on November 8!

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Listing Deadpool’s most immoral moments ever ahead of Marvel Legacy!

On October 25, writer Gerry Duggan and artist Scott Koblish send Deadpool back down villainy lane with DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #288!

Wade has been trying to play the hero—with limited success—for far too long. Now he breaks bad again, Deadpool style.

“It’s hard to blame Wade for the events that precipitated Secret Empire. He got all the credit for the bad things he did, and none of the props for the decent stuff,” explains Duggan, “Wade had done so much wrong before he ever heard Cap say the words ‘Hail Hydra’ that once he did he was already stuck on his side. Now his life has burned down. Sad!”

To prepare for this wicked road trip, we took time to highlight some of Deadpool’s more questionable stops in his recent history…“Like that time he uppercutted Kitty,” suggests Duggan. And with that, we’re off!

The Metaphor in the Room – DEADPOOL #2 (2012)

Weirdo zombie presidents attempt to take over the world, so S.H.I.E.L.D. decides to send Deadpool to hunt them down in an attempt to avoid the PR nightmare of, say, Captain America publically beating down our beloved former leaders.

In this issue, he finds Teddy Roosevelt doing what he does—big game hunting in the treacherous wilds of the Los Angeles Zoo—and…long story short, Deadpool sets a live elephant on fire. In his defense he did warn the elephant first! Sort of!

Quick, a Distraction! – DEADPOOL #11 (2012)

The demon Ventis hires—cough, blackmails, cough—Deadpool into killing people on his behalf. Wade gets hot on the trail of a victim when he runs into the devil of Hell’s Kitchen.

The two don’t exactly see eye-to-eye and Daredevil succeeds in hogtying the Regenerating Degenerate. However, he makes the mistake of thinking that Deadpool plays by the rules (tisk-tisk, Matt!), allowing Wade to up and shoot a random guy on the street to escape. Solid distraction but dang, that’s cold.

Baiting the Enemy – DEADPOOL #5 (2015)

Less hurting-random-people-and-animals and more standard bad parenting for this one. Madcap wants Wade to suffer and threatens to kill his daughter, Ellie, to make it so. In response, Wade beats him to the punch and deliberately uses his daughter like chum in the water to bait Madcap into the open. Luckily, Quicksilver manages to get Ellie out of harm’s way at the last moment.

Come on, Wade. If you’re not careful, you’ll end up with a morally-ambiguous, violence-desensitized kid on your hands. Break the cycle, dude!

Deadpool Kills Everyone – DEADPOOL KILLS THE MARVEL UNIVERSE (2012)

Let’s just breeze right over this one; we all remember DEADPOOL KILLS THE MARVEL UNIVERSE. You can’t forget the crazed mercenary shooting Spidey in the face, making it rain hero chunks after blowing up the Avengers Mansion, and of course, the piéce de résistance, turning Beast into a fur cape.

Oh and of course there’s DEADPOOL KILLS THE MARVEL UNIVERSE AGAIN (2017)—because if there’s one thing Deadpool excels at, it’s beating a dead horse…or just dead bodies of any kind, really.

Deadpool Kills Everyone Else – DEADPOOL: CLASSICS KILLUSTRATED (2013)

With everyone in the Marvel Universe six feet under, Deadpool branches out into new fictional timelines to find new victims in DEADPOOL KILLUSTRATED. With the help of his enslaved mad scientist core, Wade finds a way into some of our favorite storylines to do what he does best: murder everything that moves. I guess he gets points for not discriminating? His victims include Moby Dick, Tom Sawyer, Dracula, “The Jungle Book” animals, the Three Musketeers, and basically every other literary character you ever read about in school. English teachers, avert thine eyes!

Blinding Horror – DEADPOOL #14 (1997)

Deadpool keeps a blind old woman as a prisoner! But that’s not all! After finding an opportune moment to escape, the woman—named Blind Al—runs away to Maine to hide out with a friend named Tommy, in the belief that Wade won’t be able to track her there. But after a 3,000 mile journey, Blind Al arrives at Tommy’s house only to find Wade waiting inside with a mutilated Tommy—a next level psychopath ploy to ensure that Al stays with him of her own accord.

And people call this guy a hero!?

Find out what depraved deeds Deadpool adds to his list of indiscretions in DESPICABLE DEADPOOL #288, by writer Gerry Duggan and artist Scott Koblish, on October 25!

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