The King brings his prehistoric saga to a climactic close!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

When last we left Devil Dinosaur and Moon Boy, they’d been split up and faced alien invaders who intended to destroy them both. Moon Boy fled on his own, while DD ran around with a trio of Hill People called White-Hairs, Stone-Hand and Eev. In the pages of DEVIL DINOSAUR #79—written, drawn and edited by Jack Kirby—the pair encountered the Demon-Tree, Dino-Riders, and a witch’s portal that sent them tumbling through time.

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #7

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #7

  • Published: October 10, 1978
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 16, 2010
What is Marvel Unlimited?

In the first issue of the trio, Devil Dino and his crew happened upon the Demon-Tree first, a device left over from the U.F.O. that still had the ability to go after what it saw as intruders. The computer offered to help the Hill People, but only after blasting at Devil and encasing them in some kind of dome. After our crimson hero rediscovered Moon Boy in the forest, the two eventually returned to see the three Hill People living in a near-paradise inside the dome. However, they’d lost some of their free will, so DD busted through the force field with his might and freed Stone-Hand and Eev, allowing them to go off and live how they wanted.

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #8

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #8

  • Published: November 10, 1978
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 23, 2010
What is Marvel Unlimited?

The next issue Moon Boy sought out his people and succeeded in finding them, but also drew the attention of the Killer-Folk with his presence. The evil ones tried to capture Devil, but his partner jumped in to stop them. However, he could not stand alone against their greatest numbers and fled. As the Killers tried to tame Devil Dinosaur, Moon Boy implored his people to help his ferocious friend. Though nervous and scared about the idea, they jumped into action and did their best to fight their physical superiors. This gave Devil enough time to escape and make a ruckus of his own, which included fighting another dinosaur and stomping one of his captors to mush.

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #9

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #9

  • Published: December 01, 1978
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 30, 2010
  • Writer: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

In the final issue, our heroes stumbled across an old witch with great power. Devil tried pursuing her, but Moon Boy convinced him that they should leave her be. Not long after—and directly as she predicted—they fell into a pit that sent DD through a portal while his proto-human companion hung out for dear life. On the other side of that mysterious door, Devil found himself in 1978 Nevada not far from some cougar hunters who found much more dangerous prey than originally intended. Back in his present, Moon Boy climbed a rope dropped for him and soon supplicated himself to the might of the witch.

In the 70s, Devil gave himself a tour of Zuma City, which understandably upset the residents. As they reacted, he ran. In the past, Moon Boy, the witch, and her son worked quickly to open up yet another portal and bring Devil Dino back to his own time! Once again reunited, Moon Boy and Devil Dinosaur ran off to safer pastures and Jack Kirby wrapped a bow on one of his more interesting, entertaining, and beautiful works with plenty of insight if you look just below the surface.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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The King's final year with Marvel included the launch of Devil Dinosaur and Machine Man.

In celebration of Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday, we’re been reviewing the man’s legendary creations with a year-by-year examination of his unparalleled career at Marvel Comics. Read on for our final installment of the History of Kirby and witness more of the work that made him comic book royalty.

Though wrapping up what would be his last year of work for Marvel in 1978, Jack Kirby’s creativity reached an amazing new plateau as he debuted two new series as well as two singularly fantastic standalone projects.

Jack kicked off the year with his last cover for perhaps his greatest co-creation of all time. FANTASTIC FOUR #190 showed off the team surrounded by symbolic shots of their major arch-enemies, a fitting illustration for the artist to end on. Later, seemingly not done with the idea of the Fantastic Four, Jack wrote and drew WHAT IF? #11, a fun take on the first family of super heroes that replaced Mr. Fantastic, the Invisible Girl, the Human Torch, and the Thing with the real-life Marvel Bullpen staff of Stan Lee, Flo Steinberg, Sol Brodsky, and Jack himself.

What If? (1977) #11

What If? (1977) #11

  • Published: October 10, 1978
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: September 17, 2008
  • Writer: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Stan and Jack also collaborated on an immense project, their last as a duo. The SILVER SURFER graphic novel of 1978, written by “The Man” and illustrated by “the King,” took readers on a far-flung “Ultimate Cosmic Experience” with the Surfer to pit him once again versus the world-eating Galactus. One of the very first graphic novels ever, the tome ended up in bookstores, bringing Marvel into a whole new arena.

Jack brought his two series from the previous year, ETERNALS and BLACK PANTHER to an end in 1978, or at least to a stopping point for himself. In ETERNALS #19, he drew the climax of a gigantic, sprawling battle between the various races in the saga, and over in BLACK PANTHER he fit in T’Challa’s origin story, a new team called the Musketeers, a first-time villain called Kiber the Cruel, and new psychic powers for the titular hero.

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #1

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #1

  • Published: April 10, 1978
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 08, 2009
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Never content with resting on his laurels, Jack also launched DEVIL DINOSAUR and spun MACHINE MAN out of his 2001 series. DEVIL DINOSAUR related the ongoing plight of Moonboy, an early relative to man, and a crimson dinosaur called Devil as they made their way through a prehistoric landscape to clash with fiends and foes along the way. In MACHINE MAN, Jack told the tale of X-51, a self-sentient robot that searched for his identity and his place in the world while fighting various factions that would end his quest.

As the year came to a close, Jack Kirby looked beyond comics to new horizons and, for a time, left the industry to pursue work in the ever-growing animation business. Eventually, he returned to his first love, comic books, and continued to build upon the legacy he crafted at Marvel with projects at new companies just starting out on their journeys.

Machine Man (1978) #1

Machine Man (1978) #1

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Devil Dinosaur allows the King to show off all his unique skills!

1917 to 2017: 100 years of Kirby.

Join us to celebrate Jack “King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created that changed comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

When it came to artistic strengths, Jack Kirby had enough to fill a book—several in fact! Just off the top of the head, he excelled at monsters, aliens, heroes, villains, reaction shots, architecture, vehicles, fists, and, of course, krackle! If you want to see all of that in one place, feast your eyes on DEVIL DINOSAUR #46 from 1978!

In that three-issue arc—which Kirby wrote, drew and edited—the title beast and his pal Moon Boy investigated an awesome, huge-mouthed monster! According to the caveboy, his people foretold that this creature would not only eat the moon, but also act as just the first of many such devourers. The following two-page spread not only showed the true power of the invader, but also a great deal of the King’s aforementioned attributes!

Even though that initial scene proved just a dream, Moon Boy still stood wary of impending attacks, which came moments later as a space ship landed nearby. Upon revealing themselves with a blast of fire aimed at our heroes, the aliens then shared their mission to cleanse the area of all lifeforms! While they failed to kill Moon Boy and Devil Dinosaur, they did succeed in capturing the former and taking him back to their ship for vivisection! Meanwhile, understanding the shared threat to their world a pair of Hill Folk called White-Hairs and Stone-Hand ally themselves with Devil to send the aliens packing.

After witnessing dinosaurs loading into the ship for chemical processing and Hill Folk disintegrated for rebelling, the unorthodox trio journeyed to The Tower of Death to save their way of life. It didn’t take long for the armored aliens to give chase and, even though the Hill Folk questioned Devil’s path, he soon proved adept at using the environment against their pursuers.

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #4

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #4

  • Published: July 10, 1978
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: March 04, 2010
What is Marvel Unlimited?

As DD and the Hill Folk witnessed the denizens of The Tower Of Death—giant ants called Swarmers—obliterate one of the aliens, the invader’s brethren continue their unspeakable experiments on Moon Boy in the ship. To retaliate against Devil for killing three of their own, the aliens unleash a weapon of destruction called The Land Crusher. They then used the giant laser to destroy the Tower which sent the Swarmers in all directions. More importantly, it left Devil Dinosaur nearly dead underneath all that rubble.

DD quickly recuperated in time to help White-Hairs and Stone-Hand save a female of their kind called Eev. Eventually, the Swarmers make their way to the ship and destroy it with their sheer, overwhelming numbers. Of course, the adventure for our stars continued on as they had not been reunited by the end of DEVIL DINOSAUR #6 and still needed to deal with the alien leftover called the Demon Tree…but that will be a story for another day!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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Cullen Bunn looks at Jack Kirby's 1970s return to the monster genre!

Join us this month to celebrate Jack ”King” Kirby’s 100th birthday by learning about the characters and stories he created to change comics forever. To commemorate Jack’s centennial, we’ve sat down with the modern-day creators he influenced—and the decades of work he gifted us all.

DEVIL DINOSAUR may have only lasted nine issues in 1978, but the series continues to inspire creators to this day. Jack Kirby’s return to Marvel saw him unleash his creativity as the writer-artist-editor on a series of books including BLACK PANTHER, CAPTAIN AMERICA, and MACHINE MAN.

While those books dealt with super heroics and science fiction in various ways, DEVIL DINOSAUR took place in the distant past, where a humanoid creature named Moon Boy made friends with a huge red Tyrannosaurus-like dino. Both turned out to be outcasts who banded together to battle threats ranging from other dinosaurs to time-hopping witches!

For MONSTERS UNLEASHED and X-MEN: BLUE writer Cullen Bunn, the first issue of DEVIL DINOSAUR left a huge influence on his storytelling perspective.

“One thing about a Kirby first issue: he doesn’t waste a lot of time,” Bunn explains. “He throws the reader into the action and gets the story moving. That’s a good technique to keep in mind.”

Despite his passion for the work, Bunn didn’t experience DEVIL DINOSAUR for the first time with that initial issue; he instead came to it by way of the larger Marvel Universe!

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #1

Devil Dinosaur (1978) #1

  • Published: April 10, 1978
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 08, 2009
What is Marvel Unlimited?

“I found that book at just the right age,” he recalls. “I was reading Marvel’s GODZILLA series, which had a Devil Dinosaur guest appearance [in issues #21-22]. As soon as I read that, I knew I had to find Devil’s main series. I bought my first issue of that book at a drug store.”

Like many of those 1970s Kirby classics, Bunn’s first issue—DEVIL DINOSAUR #3 as it happened—featured some of the biggest and wildest ideas to date: “It was a story where Devil and Moon Boy faced a giant yeti creature who wore a triceratops skull as a helmet,” Bunn laughs. “It was giant monster craziness the way I liked it!”

For all of the amazing imagery and imagination, though, DEVIL DINOSAUR featured the one thing that always kicked Kirby comics to the next level: true emotion.

“The series had a lot of heart, too, showing the friendship between Devil and Moon Boy,” Bunn relays “As the book progressed, it got crazier and crazier, with aliens and cosmic horrors. Again, it was pure giddy imagination on the page. It seemed like Kirby was having a blast with the book. Really, that’s one of the things I love about all his work. It always felt like he was really reveling in the act of creation.”

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more throughout Kirby Month and beyond! And join the conversation on all of our social channels with the hashtag #Kirby100.

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