Marc Guggenheim welcomes back the Ragin’ Cajun by sharing his favorite stories!

Gambit’s back in X-MEN: GOLD #4 on May 17, and you can bet he’s bringing his own brand of Louisiana charm and a little trouble with him. To commemorate this homecoming of x-treme proportions, we spoke with writer Marc Guggenheim to take a look back at three of Remy LeBeau’s greatest stories and what might be in store for him in the upcoming arc.

Uncanny X-Men (1963) #266

Uncanny X-Men (1963) #266

What is Marvel Unlimited?
Coming in first we have, rather appropriately, Gambit’s original appearance in UNCANNY X-MEN #266 written by Chris Claremont with art by Mike Collins. “He came onto the stage fully formed and really hijacks the story away from young Storm,” says Guggenheim. This appearance also kicks off Gambit and Storm’s long running relationship, which Guggenheim says he’s happy to get to play off in the new series. What better way to do that then to bring back Remy’s days as a master thief? And while Guggenheim takes a more traditional approach to the Cajun, staying true to the voice he has engrained in his head from years of reading the original comics, he did say he loves a good pun so that might just be in the cards for us, mes amis!

Gambit (1993) #1

Gambit (1993) #1

  • Published: December 01, 1993
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 28, 2011
  • Rating: T
What is Marvel Unlimited?
Next we have the Ragin’ Cajun’s original limited series, GAMBIT, written by Howard Mackie with art by Lee Weeks. This marked the first time we see Remy as a stand-alone character and according to Guggenheim, it’s where you realize that he can really hold a spotlight with that down-home twang and devil-may-care attitude. “He’s a slightly more morally compromised Han Solo,” says Guggenheim adding that he believes X-MEN: GOLD #4 artist RB Silva’s style perfectly suits the task of capturing that unburdened and free feel Gambit brings with him. All and all we can expect more of the old school Mardi Gras feel you’ve come to expect from the bayou boy.

X-Men (1991) #24

X-Men (1991) #24

What is Marvel Unlimited?
Finally, any story that ships Gambit and his ‘chere,’ Rogue, as hard as Guggenheim does. “There is just something very pure about being in love with someone you can’t have a physical relationship with,” says the writer. Quick recap: Rogue’s powers allow her to absorb another’s memories, abilities, personality and physical traits through skin-to-skin touch but prolonged contact proves quite harmful to those around her. So despite his borderline narcissistic confidence Gambit’s advances often get met with a stone cold poker face. We have to hand it to the guy though, with all the obstacles standing in their way he sure hangs in there for his ladylove. There must be a real spark between the two.

Be sure to catch all the card-throwing, ego, and Cajun lingo May 17 in the new X-MEN: GOLD #4 by Marc Guggenheim and RB Silva!    

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Chad Bowers and Chris Sims give their take on the servants of Apocalypse!

The end has come. Apocalypse has arrived and Death rides with him. And Pestilence, War, and Famine, too.

Despite X-MEN ’92 writers Chris Sims and Chad Bowers preparing to close the book with December 28’s issue #10—and possibly take all of mutantkind down in the process—they took the time to talk to us about Apocalypse’s favorite tools, the Horsemen, and point out some of their favorites of all-time. Besides their own, of course.

“Every time they show, it’s a big deal,” Bowers argues. “It should be a big deal.

“I think, in a lot of ways, what’s most terrifying about the Horsemen is they’re people, but they are really concepts,” he continues, asserting their draw. “It’s hard to fight against a concept. Even if you beat the Horsemen, the power is just going to go to somebody else.”

“There’s always going to be a next one,” Sims agrees. “And the next one might be someone you know; it might be a horror movie monster. You don’t know.”

Archangel
“I gotta say, Walt Simonson, good at drawing,” Sims states.

“I love it,” Bowers enthuses. “I like Angel a lot as Death especially. He’s like the first X-Man to have a real lasting change.”

“I absolutely prefer him to Angel, as Archangel,” Sims concurs. “It’s really hard to empathize with Angel’s problems because he’s a rich beautiful man who has beautiful bird wings.”

“So it makes perfect sense, when he loses them, that he gets super depressed,” Bowers continues.

“It’s metal, in a literal and metaphorical sense,” Sims jokes. “It’s the one ‘aww, it’s extreme now’ reboot of a character that everyone agrees is good.”

Colossus
“That’s their friend, this giant gentle artist who can turn his body into a battering ram,” Bowers points out. “And then suddenly he’s trying to kill [them]. That’s terrifying.”

Wolverine
“He seems like a no-brainer,” Chad admits.

“With Wolverine it works in a way; with him there’s always this aspect that’s been building for 20 years at that point,” Sims elaborates. “That Wolverine is just constantly holding back so he doesn’t flip out and stab everybody. Apocalypse takes Wolverine and—all the hard work he’s done to control himself [Apocalypse] just pops the seal off, hands Wolverine a sword, and says, ‘Alright, you are going to kill everyone.’”

Gambit
“He’s a real weird choice,” Sims confesses. “Of all the things that Gambit is, seeing him as the embodiment of Death—it makes sense with his powers because everything he touches becomes a bomb. So from there, that makes sense. But in term of character, it’s something I never would’ve expected.”

“He’s Death, but he’s not Death, you know?” agrees Bowers. “Like that’s not who Gambit is.”

“Which maybe makes it a really solid idea,” Sims reflects.

Psylocke
“That makes total sense,” states Sims.

Bowers concurs. “Yeah, that’s a good one.”

“What’s scarier than a Death that can read your mind and then kill you with a sword?” points out Sims.

Jeb Lee
“Good visual,” asserts Bowers. “There’s something overall creepy about that battlefield look.”

“[He taps] the magic element that makes a great Horseman,” Sims says. “Interpreting one of the aspects in a way we really haven’t seen before.”

“[He and the other UNCANNY X-FORCE Horsemen] really did feel different,” concludes Bowers. “I liked that.”

The ’92 Horsemen
“[It’s] every corner of the X-Men Universe, tied together,” Bowers explains. “You’ve got a representative of the human interests in [Senator] Kelly, you’ve got a representative from the anti-mutant militaristic Sentinel interest with Bastion, the idealist in Exodus, and then you’ve got Mystique as the mutant that kind of gave up and became a weapon or a tool.”

“If you were going to do a big Apocalypse story in 1996—you know, like they did—who would be the guys that you’d want them to pick for that,” continues Sims. “It’s like Bastion and Exodus. In the 90’s all of them looked like they were going to be the next big villains.”

“These are guy who anchored their own events,” Bowers contends. “If the X-Men had a tough time beating these guys by themselves, what happens when they team up?”

Saddle up with Chad Bowers, Chris Sims, and Alti Firmasyah one last time for X-MEN ’92 #10 on December 28!

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Pick a card as the Ragin' Cajun comes to Battlerealm!

Practice your poker face and get ready for some 52 Card Pickup as the Ragin’ Cajun makes his explosive debut in “Marvel Contest of Champions.”

Kabam Art Director Gabriel Frizzera and Game Designers Dominic O’Grady and Justin Ostensen dropped by to talk Gambit and all the TLC the team put in to make the card-slinger stand out.

Marvel.com: First things first: I am digging Remy’s look! Did The Collector pick him straight out of the 90’s?

Dominic O’Grady: You know it! Both us and Collector are big fans of the 90’s X-Men look. Bold, colorful, and dynamic costumes and designs make each of the classic X-Men stand out, and Gambit is no exception. The Collector would be remiss if he didn’t add this version of Gambit to the many Champions present in The Contest.

Marvel.com: He’s got his staff, the duster, even the blue steel boots!

Dominic O’Grady: He’s the real deal, right down to the kinetic cards! He’s absolutely one of our most flashy characters; the animators and artists really went to town with Gambit.

Gabriel Frizzera: Our team even created a specific animation rig to make sure Gambit had an extra-long coat, like in the comics! We spared no expense!

Marvel.com: On to gameplay! Tell us a little about his Ragin’ Cajun ability. What’s going on there?

Justin Ostensen: Ragin’ Cajun is all about Gambit powering up his existing abilities for even more effectiveness. An upgrade to his signature Flak Jacket allows him to soak up even more Physical Resistance than before and give him more survivability in long fights. Additionally, Ragin’ Cajun also powers up Gambit’s new Buff in The Contest, Prowess, by granting him a large boost to Critical Damage during his already explosive Special Attacks.

Marvel.com: And what about Ante-Up? Does he get to throw some cards around or something a little less on the nose?

Justin Ostensen: Well, he’s already throwing cards during his Special Attacks and base moves, so Ante-Up is a little different. We wanted to capture Gambit’s high stakes, push-your-luck mentality with this ability. As Gambit holds Block, he builds up Kinetic Charges, which he can trade in for Prowess Buffs that boost his Special Damage. However, he has to be careful, because whenever Gambit is struck by a combo he has a chance to Fold and lose all of his Kinetic charges. It’s all about risk vs. reward and how far the player wants to push to get that extra bit of bonus damage for a massive Special Attack.

Marvel.com: Now Gambit’s no stranger to fighting games, having made appearances in multiple Marvel vs. Capcom titles. Was the team inspired by any of those games or is the Contest of Champions Gambit totally his own man?

Gabriel Frizzera: Like good Marvel fans, we all love the Marvel vs. Capcom series. But every time we develop a character, we always go straight to the source, in this case the comic books. Re-interpreting the source material always gives us a better chance to create something original and authentically Marvel, instead of echoing past successful products. Of course there are classic moves that any version of Gambit needs to have, but awesome X-Men comics were at the core of our inspiration.

Marvel.com: And when can we expect to add him to our roster?

Justin Ostensen: Gambit has stepped in to help his fellow mutants against the new Terrigenocide event and is ready to enter The Contest now. Make sure to check for in-game messaging and arenas to see how you can get your hands on the Ragin’ Cajun himself.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more “Marvel Contest of Champions” news and interviews!

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Artist Danilo Beyruth pits the Merc with a Mouth against the Ragin' Cajun!

Two of Marvel’s most lovable scoundrels find themselves at odds thanks to Ben Acker, Ben Blacker and Danilo Beyruth. DEADPOOL VS. GAMBIT, launching on June 22, reunites the team that previously worked on a story for this year’s DEADPOOL #7.

One uses his mutant abilities to roguishly adventure while the other utilizes his healing factor to slice his way through life, but both love one thing: money. That and varying degrees of trust will help bring the two together in this five-issue series which also features a variety of other characters in and out of costume thanks to Beyruth’s pencils.

We talked with Beyruth about working with the Bens again and playing off the similarities and differences of the lead characters.

Marvel.com: From a costume perspective, Gambit and Deadpool are at opposite ends of the spectrum. Do you enjoy playing with those different dynamics on the page?

Danilo Beyruth: I rather like it. They’re two characters with very distinctive looks, postures, and even body language. It has been great to explore that contrast between them. I have always been a fan of those kinds of comic book teams with very contrasted characters—like the classic X-Men trio Wolverine/Colossus/Nightcrawler—you get a richer visual experience.

Marvel.com: Both of these characters also come with healthy amounts of swagger and cockiness. Does that play into the way you pose them in a scene?

Danilo Beyruth: Yeah, I think so. And their styles are somewhat complementary, Gambit being more of a seducer and self-aware while Deadpool is more loose and reader-aware, but the two being very theatrical in their own manner.

Marvel.com: Given the lead characters, it seems safe to assume the book will also feature a good amount of humor. How do you like mixing that in with the action scenes?

Danilo Beyruth: Humor gives you wider leeway to work on expressions and body language than a more realistic approach ever would.

Marvel.com: From the looks at some of the pages, you also got to bring Spider-Man and Daredevil into the fray. Were you excited to see them in the script?

Danilo Beyruth: I did a short for a Spider-Man Infinite Comics not long ago that helped me a little to lose my fear of that character. Being a fan of the classic John Romita Sr. work on Spider-Man I’ve dreaded the perspective of drawing his uniform more than any other character. But I made it through okay.

Marvel.com: Many of the characters you’re dealing with here have established looks. Were you able to redesign any existing characters or design any from the ground up with Ben and Ben?

Danilo Beyruth: Kind of. There are a lot of characters in disguise. There are a lot of second, third and fourth stringers making appearances in street clothing and a few new characters here and there. On the drawing side of this one I did not get a chance to get bored.

Ben Acker, Ben Blacker and Danilo Beyruth unleash DEADPOOL VS. GAMBIT #1 on June 22!

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Pepe Larraz shares his sketchbook, featuring Hank Pym, Ultron, Rogue, Gambit, and more!

It’s not often that old friends come together and just pick up where they left off. Oftentimes, events of the past pop up to make things weird. That might be the case when Hank Pym returns to Earth in UNCANNY AVENGERS #9 on June 1 wearing his creation and one-time murderous robot Ultron as armor.

Series writer Gerry Duggan and guest artist Pepe Larraz will team up to tell the tale while also bringing together a pair of beloved characters: Rogue and Gambit. While Hank deals with a team wondering his motives—and who’s really driving the bus—the two former lovers see where they stand these days.

We talked with Larraz about working with Duggan, drawing Hank Pym, and his affinity for the two star crossed mutants.

Marvel.com: The team in UNCANNY AVENGERS is incredibly unique and diverse when it comes to looks and costumes. Is it challenging making them look like parts of a whole instead of individuals fighting alongside each other?

Pepe Larraz: That’s a very good question. When it comes to the characters, I try to understand what their conflict is. I learn about their past in case I don’t know it yet and think about which one is my vision of them. I think the Avengers are a group of very different people with a common purpose. That makes every one of them valuable because of their differences, but also part of a whole thing, even if they aren’t really fond of all the rest.

About this particular team, I think we have two big leaders, Cable and Steve Rogers, and my aim is to be able to tell their different ways of leadership apart. Rogue behaves here like a lieutenant; she has initiative but she isn’t a leader of the team. The soldiers could be Voodoo, Torch, Quicksilver, and Synapse. Maybe we just need time to develop their characters more, but by now they carry less of the weight of the story than the other three. Oh, and then, there is Deadpool.

Marvel.com: “The Man Who Fell to Earth” revolves around this combined version of Hank Pym and Ultron. How was it working on this new version of such a classic villain?

Pepe Larraz: Well, it made sense that the suit was the same which was designed by Jerome Opeña at the end of RAGE OF ULTRON; Jerome’s design is so good, so I used that. Hank Pym’s face is well known, so in the end I didn’t have to design too much! I prefer to use what I think makes sense for the story rather than leave my touch on everything I do, just for it to be recognizable as my work.

I focused on his facial expressions; the way he looks like a very excessively mellow mood guy, this “more-human-than-human” feeling, so warm that it makes you feel cold and suspicious. I wanted to transmit the feeling that he can instantly change his mood, becoming cocky or even dangerous. He’s not a safe guy and the tension is big. I think Gerry wrote very good scenes, slow paced, but with tension growing every second.

Marvel.com: Hank’s been one of the most complicated heroes in the Marvel Universe for decades now. Do you enjoy playing off of that on the page?

Pepe Larraz: He is, indeed. Yes I think Gerry and I wanted to transmit that not everything is going well inside him; that the pieces are still adjusting—literally—and also the fear and caution of the people around him, waiting for him to explode any second. Hank has suffered a lot of conflicts in the Marvel Universe and I always saw him as a rather dark character. Maybe my vision is influenced by his ULTIMATES version. In the opposite direction, coming back from the dead, I wanted to present him as an “everything-is-cool” guy.

Marvel.com: You also get to draw Gambit and Rogue reuniting in this issue. What can you tell us about that meeting?

Pepe Larraz: I grew up with the Gambit and Rogue love story. I started reading X-Men books when I was a kid, so having them again on the same page was great. I think things became so intense between those two; they’ve been through a lot, and they are not as close as they used to be, but I wanted to give them some warm touches. That’s why I made the cartoony panel on page 3, to make readers smile tenderly watching them, as I was smiling drawing them. Both of them deserve it.

Marvel.com: It sounds like you and Gerry were on the same wavelength with a lot of the story elements. How is it working with him on this script?

Pepe Larraz: Great, actually. I knew little of Gerry’s work before this series, but, you know, that’s because I spend so much time making comics that I don’t have time to read them! I like the way Gerry writes dialog, builds the scenes and the fact that he’s not scared to make almost a whole issue of people talking on a super hero book, because the talk is worthy. He’s very open to suggestions, as well as the rest of the team, [editors] Tom [Brevoort], Alanna [Smith], and Daniel [Ketchum].

Gerry Duggan and Pepe Larraz bring Hank Pym and Ultron back to Earth while also reuniting Rogue and Gambit in the pages of UNCANNY AVENGERS #9 on June 1!

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Ben Acker and Ben Blacker introduce the Merc with a Mouth to the Ragin' Cajun!

This June, writers Ben Acker, Ben Blacker along with artist Danilo Beyruth offer fans a Marvel Universe filtered through the eyes of two of its biggest ne’er-do-wells in DEADPOOL VS. GAMBIT.

“It’s a fun lens through which to look at the Marvel Universe, where they’re super, but not necessarily heroes,” says Acker. “Deadpool and Gambit aren’t ‘with great power comes great responsibility’ guys. They look out for number one.”

“I think they’re interesting because, unlike, say, Spider-Man, the reader doesn’t know if Gambit and Deadpool are going to do the ‘right thing,’” agrees Blacker. “Their morality is muddy. They’re good guys, but only because they’re better than the bad guys.”

It becomes challenging then to put two ‘better than the bad guys’ types in a situation where they might end up cooperating, no matter how briefly. For the writers, the key came in finding the central theme of the book.

“We had to zero in on the common theme of both a Gambit/Deadpool relationship and a con story,” Blacker explains. “That theme is trust. Once we figured that out—that their working relationship is about how much and how far they trust each other—the writing became a lot of fun. We could layer all of the cool con stuff on top of that.”

Therefore it becomes paramount to convey the subtleties of winning and losing trust against a backdrop of high action. Thankfully for the writers—and readers—Beyruth has proven more than equal to making that balance a reality.

“He’s just great,” enthuses Acker. “We needed someone to balance the humor inherent to Deadpool and Gambit and who can nail the action of this very action-heavy book as well as the emotional and tonal stakes of a good con story.”

“Danilo picks up on body language and character acting in a great way,” Blacker continues. “Often times it’s hard to convey subtle emotions with these masked characters. With Danilo, you know how a character is feeling by the way he’s standing.”

That talent will not be focused on the titular protagonists either, the writers reveal.

“You’ll get to see Raul Chalmers,” promises Acker. “Who is that? He goes by the Black Fox and is the brains behind Deadpool and Gambit’s schemes.”

Deadpool Vs. Gambit #1 cover by Kevin Wada

Deadpool Vs. Gambit #1 cover by Kevin Wada

“We don’t want to give everything away, but in issue #1, you’ll see Daredevil and Spider-Man who were a blast to write,” Blacker offers. “Acker scripted the first pass on that issue, and I feel like he was auditioning to write a regular Spider-Man book. He crushed the audition. I wish I could give him the job. Other than those guys, we tried to work in cameos from some oddballs of the Marvel Universe. Maybe some guys you haven’t seen in a while or haven’t seen given as much real estate as you will in Deadpool vs. Gambit.”

“There’s another character [that] we are plucking from Marvel obscurity and shining a big old light on,” confirms Acker. “You don’t know him now, but you will once we’re done with him.”

The writers feel sure that even for readers who do not necessarily count the Cajun thief or the Merc with a Mouth amongst their favorites, the book will offer plenty of reason to be picked up.

“Beyond the fun con and heist stuff, I think this book is genuinely funny,” asserts Blacker.

Unable to resist, he adds, “There’s also a very weird turn in issue #3 that no one will see coming.”

Deal yourself in for DEADPOOL VS. GAMBIT #1, available in June!

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Tentacled villain Omega Red debuts in this 90's classic!

It’s time to face facts, true believers — the 90’s were awesome. The pouches were plentiful, the costumes were impractical, and Marvel Universe dentists made a fortune correcting damages caused by perpetually gritted teeth. Thanks to the power of nostalgia, though, what would once be considered extremely embarrassing can now be called extremely awesome!

With that in mind, we’ve pulled a Marvel comic from the not-so-modern era and broken it down, one choice fact at a time! This week we’re singling out X-MEN #4 by Jim Lee and John Byrne. Here’s “The Resurrection and the Flesh” by the numbers!

X-Men (1991) #4

X-Men (1991) #4

What is Marvel Unlimited?

63 visible segments on Omega Red’s right tentacle

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4

20 hands laid on Omega Red’s body

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4

7 pouches on Cyclops’ belt

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4

5 tech-heavy Hand ninjas

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4

4 X-Men playing basketball

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4

3 shots that get nothing but net

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4


2
X-Men embarking on a soon-to-be-sabotaged date

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4

1 slam dunk

Art from X-Men #4

Art from X-Men #4

The 90’s continue in the all-new X-MEN ’92 Infinite Comic!

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Check out past examples of mutants switching sides as the Inversion of AXIS hits Amazing X-Men!

People switch sides all the time in the Marvel Universe. Generally this applies to just forming new alliances, but in more extreme cases it can mean a hero goes rogue or a villain goes legit.

The X-Men, featuring dozens of roster incarnations, have certainly seen their fair share of flip-flopping. Before we dive into the pages of AMAZING X-MEN #14 on December 10 and see more mutant gets Inverted by AXIS, let’s check out some past occurrences of alignment changes!

X-Men (2004) #185

X-Men (2004) #185

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Gambit

Technically Gambit started out as a bad seed, sought redemption, rinse and repeat. Originally a member of the Thieves’ Guild, Remy LeBeau has never been a stranger to the underworld. However, despite his sordid past, no one could have expected the transformation he took.

Joining the ranks of Apocalypse’s Horsemen, Gambit went bananas on his former allies and forged a pact with one of the biggest baddies in the universe. He’d eventually see the light, returning to his mutant family, though his stint as Death stays as a constant scar on his storied track record of awesomeness.

Uncanny X-Force (2010) #10

Uncanny X-Force (2010) #10

  • Published: May 18, 2011
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: December 05, 2012
  • Rating: Parental Advisory
  • Writer: Rick Remender
  • Penciller: Billy Tan
  • Cover Artist: Esad Ribic
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Angel

We all know the story of how Apocalypse took Angel, transformed him into his avatar, and changed his destiny forever. While Archangel remained a staple of Charles Xavier’s heroic mutant groups, his tragic transformation never really ended.

Implanted with a Death Seed that grew in power, Archangel—in essence—became his villainous creator. His reign as dark lord number one didn’t last the ages Apocalypse expected, but it caused tremendous chaos throughout the various X-factions for years to come. Vanquished, granted a rebirth and new identity, Warren Worthington remains forever linked to an apocalyptic history.

Uncanny X-Men (1963) #135

Uncanny X-Men (1963) #135

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Jean Grey

One of the most historically tragic tales to grace the pages of Marvel Comics, “The Dark Phoenix Saga” altered the existence of Jean Grey beyond reproach.

Profiled by the Phoenix Force for having unlimited potential, Jean succumbed to the power of this ancient entity and reached near madness and destruction. Operating as Dark Phoenix, she brought the universe almost to its knees before ultimately ridding herself of the cosmic curse. Her life would be entwined with this presence for years to come.

Avengers Vs. X-Men (2012) #6

Avengers Vs. X-Men (2012) #6

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Cyclops

Cyclops didn’t exactly turn villain in the true sense—at first.

Scott Summers took the position of radical activist that lined-up more with the principles of Magneto than the law of the land. During the Avengers Vs. X-Men war, Cyke led the charge for mutant existence, tangling with anyone who got in his way, including Captain America.

Summers, like his bride before him, became an avatar for the Phoenix Force, using this remarkable pool of power to battle all comers and reshape the world for mutant kind. The power being too much for even the X-Men’s leader and Dark Phoenix consumed him, leading him to horrific actions and an eventual prison sentence.

Don’t miss the latest twists and turns in the continuing story of AXIS in AMAZING X-MEN #14 on December 10!

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See which heroes from the Marvel Universe made their mark with us during this pivotal decade!

As we continue to celebrate Marvel’s 75th anniversary all year long on Marvel.com, we made it to the 1990’s, and “Marvel Reborn,” a period of equal parts success and upheaval, which saw a variety of different characters spin out of established franchises as well as make their own indelible mark on the Marvel Universe.

This week, we count down our top 10 Marvel heroes to debut during the 1990’s. Have your own thoughts? Let us know on Twitter using the hash tag #Marvel75!

Ghost Rider (Daniel Ketch)

Ghost Rider (Daniel Ketch)

10. GHOST RIDER (Danny Ketch)
First Appearance: GHOST RIDER (1990) #1
Why He’s #10: “So-called legacy heroes almost never survive in the Marvel Universe, but Danny Ketch is the exception that proves the rule. The second Ghost Rider debuted in 1990 and soon blazed his own trail. Flaming chains whipping about him, the anti-hero clashed with the likes of Spider-Man, the X-Men, and especially the Punisher. But most often the Rider saved his vengeance for Blackout, the dark villain who murdered his sister. Ketch soon learned he was the long-lost brother of original Rider Johnny Blaze, and the pair teamed up both as a duo and with the mystic team known as the Midnight Sons. Since then, Ketch has remained an active part of the Rider’s world.” – Kiel Phegley
Digital Comics Spotlight:
GHOST RIDER (1990) #5

Scarlet Spider (Ben Reilly)

Scarlet Spider (Ben Reilly)

9. THE SCARLET SPIDER (Ben Reilly)
First Appearance: WEB OF SPIDER-MAN #118
Why He’s #9: “Created to be a villain and destroy Spider-Man, the clone who would come to be known as Ben Reilly had every reason to take the easy way out: slay Peter Parker, steal his life, and no one would be the wiser. In the end, however, Reilly was too much like the man whose DNA and memories he shared to either kill Peter or reject the axiom of with ‘With great power comes great responsibility.’ Thus, although it often left him grieving for the life he could not have, Reilly donned the costume of the Scarlet Spider and protected people, alongside his genetic twin, on his own, or with the New Warriors. The Scarlet Spider, time and again, rejected that which seemed to promise him his best chances at happiness so he could do the right thing proving, clone or not, he was unquestionably a hero.” – Tim Stevens
Digital Comics Spotlight:
WEB OF SPIDER-MAN #122

Gambit by David Yardin

Gambit by David Yardin

8. GAMBIT
First Appearance: UNCANNY X-MEN #266
Why He’s #8: “Gambit defines the idiom ‘lucky at cards, unlucky in love.’ The charismatic mutant from New Orleans exemplifies cool. He has slick powers, an incredibly tragic love life—you gotta pull for him and Rogue—and he’s got style to spare. Since bursting on the scene in 1990, Remy LeBeau has pretty much batted the cycle as far as mutants are concerned. He’s been an intricate part of the X-Men and X-Factor, he’s partnered with Storm, had a piece of his brain taken by Mr. Sinister, and he even rolled with the Horsemen Of Apocalypse as Death himself. Trained by the Thieves’ Guild, the Ragin’ Cajun has more than a few tricks up his sleeve and continues to prove why it’s always best to play with a full deck of cards—especially when you can make them explode.” – Rick Laprade
Digital Comics Spotlight:
GAMBIT (1993) #1

Domino

Domino

7. DOMINO
First Appearance: NEW MUTANTS #98
Why She’s #7: “Thanks to her probability manipulation powers, things just seem to fall into place for the mercenary-turned-super hero named Domino. Don’t let her black and white demeanor fool you; this gun slinging and wisecracking mutant has one colorful personality. She even has a few different first appearances under her pouch covered belt, making her a contender for the most ‘90’s member of the extremely radical X-Force. She first appeared in NEW MUTANTS #98 as one of Cable’s go-to allies, and she helped him make the teen team more militaristic. A later visit from Deadpool revealed that Domino to be an imposter and also brought the genuine article into the fray. With her identity straightened out and her place on X-Force secured, Domino has evolved into the X-Men’s resident black ops specialist and good luck charm—accept no substitutes.” – Brett White
Digital Comics Spotlight:
X-FORCE #107

Marvel.com's Top 1990's Heroes

Marvel.com’s Top 1990’s Heroes

6. WAR MACHINE (James Rhodes)
First Appearance: IRON MAN #282
Why He’s #6: “It cannot be easy to be the follow-up act, especially when the person you are following is named Tony Stark and the role is Iron Man. That was life for James Rhodes who was recruited and periodically donned the armor of his friend and boss. But Rhodes became more than a stand-in and before long he had to strike out on his own. Rechristening himself War Machine and piloting the Variable Threat Response Battle Suit armor, he quickly proved that he was no mere second fiddle. Guided by his own morality now, Rhodes did not always fall into lockstep behind his friend or the Avengers, but there was never any doubt that he was every bit the hero.” – Tim Stevens
Digital Comics Spotlight:
IRON MAN #310

The New Warriors

The New Warriors

5. THE NEW WARRIORS
First Appearance: THOR #411
Why They’re #5: “By the time we reached the 90’s, we had the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Avengers, and all their various spin-off groups, but these teams represented the past—those of us just coming into comics needed heroes for our generation. Enter the New Warriors, a new team with a diverse line-up featuring dark vigilante Night Thrasher, experienced hero Nova, conflicted mutant Firestar, straight arrow Marvel Boy, hot-tempered Namorita, and, of course, Speedball. The interpersonal drama generated by their extremely varied backgrounds and social beliefs—also: kissing—proved just as enjoyable to read about as them taking on foes like Psionex or The Sphinx. Two themes pervaded the initial run of the New Warriors: figuring out how to do the right thing in a more complicated world than other heroes came up in and making the hard choices that came with that mission statement. The original New Warriors have been often imitated, but never quite duplicated due to the unique love this combination of characters and their complex adventures yielded.” – Ben Morse
Digital Comics Spotlight:
AVENGERS #341

X-Force by Greg Capullo

X-Force by Greg Capullo

4. X-FORCE
First Appearance: NEW MUTANTS #100 
Why They’re #4: “After years of waiting to become the next X-Men, the New Mutants had become impatient. Abandoned by their supposed mentors, from Professor X to Magneto and the rest of the adult mutant group, they lacked direction. Enter Cable. The mysterious soldier from the future took control of the teen team and forged them into the paramiltary X-Force unit, proactively attacking threats ignored by the X-Men and X-Factor. However, before long, Cannonball and company would show their new leader as much as he imparted on them, and X-Force would prove to be the melting pot of all their teachers’ philosophies. With or without Cable at the head of the table, the one-time X-Men-in-waiting turned out to be the mutants who could balance multiple dreams and do what needed to be done in order to advance their cause.” – Ben Morse
Digital Comics Spotlight: X-FORCE (1991) #1

The Thunderbolts by Mark Bagley

The Thunderbolts by Mark Bagley

3. THE THUNDERBOLTS
First Appearance: INCREDIBLE HULK #449 
Why They’re #3: Do not pretend otherwise. There is no shame in it. The Thunderbolts surprised us all. Looking for all the world like a generic Avengers, a sort of copy of a copy standing in for Earth’s Mightiest Heroes after the events of Onslaught caused most of that team to disappear, the T-bolts hardly seemed to be poised to provide one of the biggest twist endings of the 90’s. And yet, there, on the final page, stood the team revealed as their true selves: the Masters of Evil in hero drag. What makes the Thunderbolts endear, however, comes after that moment. They were not just a twist ending in their first issue, but a complicated and challenging story of loyalty, redemption, world domination, love, interdimensional travel, and more. That template, established from the moment they arrived on the scene, has kept the team relevant through multiple volumes and lineups. Not bad for a team that had us all thinking they were Avengers-lite.” – Tim Stevens
Digital Comics Spotlight: THUNDERBOLTS (1997) #1


Deadpool

Deadpool

2. DEADPOOL
First Appearance: NEW MUTANTS #98
Why He’s #2: “Who’s Deadpool? Some call him an opportunist, some call him an anti-hero, still others call him late for dinner, but there’s no denying that the infamous ‘Merc with a Mouth’ himself thinks he’s the greatest mutant manhunter this poor world’s ever been saddled with. Wade Wilson’s got this incredible personal healing factor, see? With that in his arsenal, plus a few big guns and even bigger knives, he’s the guy you hire when all the smart people say ‘no!’ Deadpool will go anywhere, do anything, eat anything! And like it! I mean weird, right? All this along with his inimitable sick sense of humor made him a standout in his early appearances; when the razor’s edge walk between moral and unhinged kicked in not long after—a balance he struggles to maintain to this day—he became one of Marvel’s most indelible additions in recent memory.” – Jim Beard
Digital Comics Spotlight:
DEADPOOL (1993) #1


Untitled Image

Untitled Image

1. CABLE
First Appearance: NEW MUTANTS #87
Why He’s #1: “For better or worse, no Marvel character better embodies the 1990’s better than Nathan Summers, aka Cable. He burst on the scene enshrouded in mystery, his striking design and massive weapons assuring that nobody would ignore him. Whereas the New Mutants had forever been the overshadowed younger siblings to the X-Men, Cable imparted his ‘get them before they can get you’ philosophy on them and created X-Force. As the decade wore on, the enigmatic origins of the character came unraveled, revealing his ties to Cyclops and a troubled childhood he overcame through grit and faith in his destiny. The Cable who exited the 90’s only superficially resembled the one who entered it; embracing his lineage but not letting go of the experiences that forged him, he became equal parts soldier and philosopher. Early on, Cable may have seemed a fleeting figured destined to fade with his era, but the deeper layers to the character ensured his vibrant march into the modern day.” – Ben Morse
Digital Comics Spotlight:
CABLE: BLOOD & METAL #1

Share your thoughts on Twitter with the hash tag #Marvel75 and keep up on Marvel’s 75th anniversary celebration at marvel.com/75

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Storm and friends tangle with the Phalanx for the first time in this action-packed issue!

It’s time to face facts, true believers – the ’90s were awesome. The pouches were plentiful, the costumes were impractical, and Marvel Universe dentists made a fortune correcting damages caused by perpetually gritted teeth. Thanks to the power of nostalgia, though, what would once be considered extremely embarrassing can now be called extremely awesome!

With that in mind, we’ve pulled a Marvel comic from the not-so-modern era and broken it down, one radical fact at a time! This week we’re singling out UNCANNY X-MEN #312 by Scott Lobdell and Joe Madureira. Here’s “Romp” by the numbers!

Uncanny X-Men (1963) #312

Uncanny X-Men (1963) #312

What is Marvel Unlimited?

20 blocks away from the action

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

 

8 instances of someone calling Storm by a nickname: Yukio uses “Wind Rider” 2 times, Gambit says “Stormy” 6 times

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

 

6 hands and 3 faces on 1 Phalanx entity

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

 

5 kinetically charged playing cards

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

 

4 uses of weather as a weapon: 2 lightning bolts, 1 gust of wind, and 1 extreme drop in temperature

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

 

3 belts around Storm’s waist

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

 

2 mentions of the Bright Lady

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

 

1 “By the goddess!”

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Art from Uncanny X-Men #312

Ororo Munroe’s next big adventure begins today in STORM #1

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