Artist Christian Ward joins writer Jason Aaron for Thor's futuristic journey!

At the very end of THOR #1 was a promise that the All-Grandfather’s cosmic adventure would continue in THOR #5, which will go on sale September 19. While there will be plenty of Thor to hold readers over until then, THOR #5 will not just continue writer Jason Aaron’s epic tale, it will also carry on Christian Ward’s amazing artwork! Marvel.com asked Aaron about what we can expect from the upcoming story, and Ward shared his creative inspirations and what it’s like to draw Thor as an aging god.

If you’ve read THOR #1, you know that a very famous mutant made a surprise appearance at the very end. Wolverine, also as an old man, and also possessed by the Phoenix Force, showed up while Thor was sailing through the dying universe. But Jason Aaron’s plans for Thor and Old Man Logan’s new incarnation may not be what you’re expecting — and they certainly won’t be alone:

“When [Thor] goes looking for answers and runs into his old friend Wolverine, a very, very Old Man Logan who’s now in possession of the Phoenix force, Thor figures he’s found an ally in his quest to save creation. But it’s not quite that simple. By reigniting the fires of life on Earth, Thor has drawn the attention of some dark cosmic forces. If you thought Old Man Phoenix was wild, just wait until you see who else is about to join the party.”

While creating a look for THOR, Christian Ward drew inspiration from a number of sources from “1970s rock album cover artwork” to other comic artists including Moebius, Frank Quietly, and Bill Sienkiewicz. He also cited “illustrators like Roger Dean but equally fine artists like Gustav Klimt.” He added: “I used to be more of a fine art painter, and one of the things I love about space scenes is that they feel more like big canvas paintings with masses of swirling colors and layers of textures.” Citing his past work on BLACK BOLT, Ward said Jack Kirby was also a big inspiration since he “wanted the universe to feel huge with endless color and possibility.” To capture not just an older Thor but an older universe, he wanted the latter to seem “dead and empty yet still interesting” and used oil and rust for color themes.

As for drawing an elderly Thor, Ward said that “[d]rawing old faces is always easier. Lines in someones face tell their story.” He added that with this part of Thor’s story taking place “untold eons from now,” that is a very long story. Ward continued: “Beyond just being old, Thor’s tired so I wanted him to feel heavy. (His armor is a great way to emphasis that too!) But at the same time he’s more powerful than he’s ever been, so all that power’s built up in him like a powder keg. We’re going to see some of that explosive power in #5 and it’s been really good fun to bring it crackling to life.”

With the appearance by a Phoenix-possessed Wolverine at the end of THOR #1, THOR #5 promises to be a tale of galactic proportions!

THOR #5, written by Jason Aaron with art by Christian Ward, goes on sale September 19! Contact your local comic shop to pre-order your copy!

 

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The writer details the new iteration of Earth's Mightiest Team!

Written by Jess Harrold

The old order changeth once again—for a bold new era! And it doesn’t come much bolder than the creative team of Jason Aaron and Ed McGuinness putting together one of the mightiest Avengers rosters ever seen! Here, Aaron talks about his plans for the book—including building on ideas he introduced in MARVEL LEGACY #1.

Marvel: So with you writing, the incredible Ed McGuinness on art and a spectacular lineup, there’s no doubt about it: this is one blockbuster book! What can fans expect?

Jason Aaron: Coming into this, we wanted it to feel big and epic—like a huge Marvel event, every arc. So I wanted a lineup of all big, iconic characters. Some of them you’ve seen as Avengers—like Steve Rogers, Tony Stark, and Thor Odinson—but for the first time in years, the “big three” are back together. There’s also some characters we’re not used to seeing. Ghost Rider, I guess, is the big surprise, and it’s cool for me getting back to writing Ghost Rider again.

Marvel: And Captain Marvel and Black Panther make for a big five! There’s been a lot of conflict between these characters in recent years. How well are they all going to cope with working together again?

Jason Aaron: Well it’s not necessarily a “snap your fingers, and it’s done” kind of thing. The first arc is really about the hardships of putting that band back together. It’s very much a team drawn together for very specific reasons, instead of just Steve Rogers calling people in his Rolodex. The circumstances of this threat are really what bring these characters together. They are drawn into this battle for very specific reasons, which only become evident as that arc rolls on—and then continue to play a part going forward. Some of that clearly links back to the prehistoric Avengers introduced in MARVEL LEGACY #1. You will see them again in this arc, and they will be a part of the series going forward.

Marvel: Will you be adopting a similar multi-timeline approach to the one we’ve seen in your THOR run?

Jason Aaron: Yep, absolutely. In this first arc, the roots of the Celestial threat the Avengers are facing go back to those prehistoric days with Odin. But we will come back between arcs and do issues focusing on that group and those prehistoric characters. We will learn more about them as we go forward, get to see them in action in the past and see the ways their adventures connect to the present day.

Marvel: Another stalwart Avenger on the roster is Jennifer Walters—but is she She-Hulk or Hulk? And what can fans expect from her on the team?

Jason Aaron: Yeah, I’ve just been calling her “Hulk” in the book. It is the same Jen Walters we’ve seen in recent issues of her own series so we definitely continue on from that. But this story also changes things for her and takes her in a bit of a different direction. We switch around her powers a little bit and try to differentiate her more from her cousin. What is exciting me is to see Ed McGuiness draw the Hulk again!

Marvel: As for the new guy you mentioned—we know you know a thing or two about Ghost Riders, but what do you like about Robbie Reyes?

Jason Aaron: He’s a great entry-level character for the Avengers; he is still very much a new kid on the block. He doesn’t really know these characters and has not been a part of something quite like this. You know his life has been pretty crazy in its own right since he became the Ghost Rider, but this really takes things up a notch. We get to see him level up in terms of his power. He is unlike any of the previous Ghost Riders so we will continue to explore what that means and exactly what he is capable of. Also, the more I write it, the more I love the idea of having a guy in the Avengers who drives a car. He just goes driving into battle in the Hell Charger. I love that, and I love the way Ed’s drawing him.

Marvel: Another character you have history with is Doctor Strange, who is on the team at least to begin with, right?

Jason Aaron: He pops up initially in a different sort of team-up. He and Black Panther are investigating something that pulls him into this bigger mystery. Strange plays a big part of this first arc, but you kind of have to wait and see after that who sticks around. I don’t want to specifically have a cast too large, but I think we will have at least one slot rotating—have a character join for a couple of arcs, and then somebody else takes the pledge. There’ll be some old familiar faces and some we’re not used to seeing in the pages of an Avengers comic.

Marvel: You mentioned the Celestial threat, the ominously named Final Host—they seem like a great fit for Ed’s bombastic style.

Jason Aaron: Absolutely. We see a lot of different Celestials over the course of the story—some classic ones, some all-new designed by Ed, which look amazing. Ed is also so great at conveying the feel of something like this: our Avengers against giant space gods who are thousands of feet tall. How can the Avengers go toe-to-toe with characters who are that powerful? That’s the challenge they face right there out of the gate.

Marvel: And it all begins with a Free Comic Book Day issue featuring another stellar artist, Sara Pichelli, correct?

Jason Aaron: Yes, it’s sort of a direct lead in to AVENGERS #1. It’s mostly a story about Black Panther and Odin—a meeting of the king of Wakanda and the All-Father of Asgard, which again kind of stretches back to those prehistoric Avengers and plants the seeds for the Celestial threats the Avengers will face. And it’s free!

Marvel: And from there, the main series is set to really blow everyone’s socks off.

Jason Aaron: Yeah, I want this to be a book that issue to issue gives you a look at the entire Marvel Universe. So we will travel the globe, we will cross the galaxies, we will go to all the different hot spots of the MU. If you are only reading one Marvel Comic—not that you should just read one Marvel Comic—this book will give you an idea of what the entire breadth of the Marvel Universe looks like right now at this moment in time.

AVENGERS #1 by Jason Aaron and Ed McGuinness is on sale May 2!

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This variant cover for Mighty Thor #706 features Laura Martin on colors!

The final issue of writer Jason Aaron, artist Russell Dauterman, and colorist Matt Wilson’s landmark MIGHTY THOR series is getting the send-off it deserves with a special variant cover for issue #706 by legendary creator Walter Simonson!

Colored by Laura Martin, the variant for THOR #706 depicts Jane Foster, engaged in battle with the walking hatred, the Mangog. For the first—and last—time, Walter Simonson lends a hand to the Mighty Thor.

 

“We’re honored to have legendary THOR writer and artist Walter Simonson provide this variant cover for the finale of ‘The Death Of The Mighty Thor,’” says series editor Wil Moss. “This is actually his first time drawing Jane Thor and the Mangog, a classic Thor villain from the Jack Kirby and Stan Lee era that he never go the chance to draw before.”

Say farewell to Jane Foster Thor with this special variant cover for MIGHTY THOR #706, by Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, and Matt Wilson, on April 18!

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Jason Aaron and Mike Del Mundo take the helm!

This June, the Odinson regains his mantle.

THOR #1, written by Jason Aaron with art by Mike Del Mundo, sees the start of a new mission for the God of Thunder. The artifacts of Asgard have been scattered across the Earth, and to reclaim them, Thor will have to face some ugly truths…Like the production cost of hundreds of new hammers! And he’ll need every last one of them if he’s going to stop the unstoppable when none other than the Juggernaut joins the fray.

Emerging from his landmark run on MIGHTY THOR, Jason Aaron is ready for this fresh take: “On the one hand, I still feel like I’m writing the same Thor story that began six years ago in the pages of THOR GOD OF THUNDER #1. But at the same time, GOD OF THUNDER had a very different look and feel and focus than Jane Foster’s story,” he explains. “And even though Thor Odinson is now reclaiming his mantle, this new volume will also be going in a very different direction. Thor has a completely new status-quo. Actually the entire landscape of his corner of the Marvel Universe has been changed in the wake of the ‘Death of the Mighty Thor’ arc in MIGHTY THOR. But there’s still a War of the Realms raging, and Thor isn’t looking to stand on the sidelines.”

Thor #1 Cover by Mike Del Mundo

The writer continues, “The thing I’m most excited about though is getting to work with Mike Del Mundo again. I loved the beautiful craziness he brought to the page when we did WEIRDWORLD together, and things are even wilder and more beautiful here. There just aren’t many artists in comics today whose work I love and admire more than Mike’s, so I feel incredibly fortunate to be launching this new direction for Thor with Mike by my side.”

And Del Mundo is ready for the action as well: “I’m super excited about this new journey! Working with Jason on WEIRDWORLD was so much fun and badassery and I’m getting that same excitedness and feels with this new THOR series—with added thunder!”

Prepare for THOR #1, by Jason Aaron and Mike Del Mundo, on June 13! And stay up-to-date with all the exciting news coming from Marvel Comics at marvel.com/marvel2018comics!

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Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, and Matt Wilson say farewell to The Mighty Thor.

Somewhere in Kansas, Jason Aaron sits alone in a room talking to action figures.

Jane Foster and the creature called Mangog, the central characters of the climax of his seminal series, MIGHTY THOR #705—out March 21—stand on opposing sides of his office. Jane says something inspirational and defiant; the Mangog spits and roars. Jason hears them, and writes.

“These characters speak to me; I’m just a vessel for them,” he explains. “This Jane Foster Thor statue just stands there looking at me as I write. And my Kirby-style Mangog statue as well. He’s been there for years.”

It’s something he’s been doing since childhood—talking to characters, making them clash, telling their stories. The only difference between the stories he imagined as a kid and the ones he dreams up today is that now thousands of people are watching what he does in the sandbox. And though the anticipation for the penultimate issue of Jane Foster’s story is at a fever pitch, he maintains a sense of youthful appreciation for the work: “Not only do I get to write these characters—not only do I get paid for it—but then I get to see them brought to life by some of the best artists working today.”

Common consensus has emerged that this run of MIGHTY THOR will go down as an all-time great. And forging the story alongside Aaron, since issue #1, has been artist Russell Dauterman and colorist Matt Wilson.

Since the series began, Dauterman’s dexterity has allowed readers to jump page-by-page between heartbreaking emotion and heart stopping action—between Jane’s solitary moments staring at a chemo drip and the War Thor defending Asgardia from a monster comprised of a billion angry souls. Those lines, combined with Wilson’s colors—from the anemic halogen lights of hospital waiting rooms to shimmering fragments of a shattered Rainbow Bridge—have matched Aaron’s poetry every step of the way.

“Jason’s scripts for this arc have been incredible. They’re big, bold, and really moving. I’m trying to capture all of that and have it seep into every bit of the art,” says Dauterman. “I drew my first Jane Foster Thor nearly four years ago, and I had no idea the impact the character would have. I think a lot about all the people who’ve written to say what Jane means to them. I really want to do right by those folks with the finale, and to do Jane justice.”

Via their seamless, stellar work, Aaron, Dauterman, and Wilson have formed their own Warriors Three (Jason would be Volstagg, because beard)—an inseparable force committed to Thor’s cause. “It’s not often that creators get to work on longer runs in super hero comics these days, or even stick together as a creative team,” Wilson says. “We’ve been very fortunate to have all this time together, to tell this story.”

Jason’s been in conversation with Jane Foster for years. And though she advises him on every panel and page, he’s been steering the series to a definitive point since the very beginning. “This is a story I’ve been waiting to write for literally years,” he says, “I’ve always known that this is where Jane ends up.” A worthy end awaits the Mighty Thor.

The final story arc, titled “The Death of The Mighty Thor,” began in the landmark issue #700. And the emotion present in all Jane Foster Thor stories extends beyond the page. “Saying goodbye is going to be rough. I did the layouts for issue #706 recently, and the finality of everything really hit me. I’ve never been so emotional when drawing layouts before,” recalls Dauterman.

And Aaron, the master of Jane’s fate, agrees. “This was the first time I ever cried as I was writing. I was surprised by it. And it happened again as I received the art for these issues.” Time is winding down for this unlikely hero. The creators, and Jane Foster herself, know what’s coming next.

In issue #703, Doctor Stephen Strange, standing beside the hero’s hospital bed, put the situation in plain terms: “If you change into Thor…Even one more time…There will be no coming back. Jane Foster will die.”

“It’s been spelled out to her,” says the scribe. “She can fight her cancer as Jane, or pick up the hammer one last time… To save the gods.”

And she does. At the conclusion of the latest issue, Jane Foster took hold of Mjolnir again. Just like the statue that observes Jason as he writes—with the ancient mallet in her right hand—there was no other way this story could end.

Since issue #1 in November 2015, Jane Foster has proven herself worthy. And she’ll prove it once more as she looks to save the gods from destruction; from the Mangog on the other side of Jason’s office. A battle for the ages arrives in issue #705, the penultimate story of a series already known as a modern classic.

“My name is Jane Foster,” the Mighty Thor concludes, “And if this is the story of how I die… Then know that it won’t end without one hell of a fight.”

Read MIGHTY THOR #705, by Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, and Matt Wilson, on March 21.

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Jason Aaron and Donny Cates pen the new number ones!

Make Mine Marvel this May!

Jump on board as Earth’s Mightiest Heroes and the Venom symbiote get fresh creative teams and ground shaking new adventures! AVENGERS #1, written by Jason Aaron with art by Ed McGuinness, launches on May 2! And VENOM #1, by writer Donny Cates and artist Ryan Stegman, kicks off on May 9!

Art by Jim Cheung

“Over the next couple of weeks, we’ll be rolling out new beginnings for a few of our key franchises—new creative teams, new starting points, new storylines—all the big stuff that we’ve been building towards since Marvel Legacy began. This isn’t a clearing of the slate—while these new starts will kick off with new #1s, we’ll be maintaining the classic Legacy issue counts as dual numbering on these titles as well,” says SVP and Executive Editor Tom Brevoort. “Oh, and don’t read anything into not seeing a character on the Jim Cheung piece…we can only squeeze so many characters in there without killing poor Jim!”

In AVENGERS, the Big Three are reunited at last! Thor Odinson, Steve Rogers, and Tony Stark join forces once again to save the world from total annihilation at the hands of their most powerful enemies yet: the 2000-foot-tall space gods known as Celestials! And as teased throughout the pages of recent Marvel Comics, the Final Host will arrive…

Joining Thor, Captain America, and Iron Man in the new iteration of the team will be an unexpected, unprecedented collection of super heroes! Get a peek at Ed McGuinness’ art for AVENGERS #1 here!

And while Earth’s Mightiest Heroes fight the good fight on a cosmic scale, an inky symbiote will stretch across the streets of New York City and beyond in writer Donny Cates and artist Ryan Stegman’s VENOM!

In the wake of S.H.I.E.L.D.’s collapse, a primordial evil has been awakened beneath the streets of NYC, and with it, something equally evil has awakened in that most Wicked of Webslingers. This never-before-seen threat could force Venom to relinquish everything it holds dear…including Eddie Brock!

Get ready for a Venom adventure 1000 years in the making…And catch a glimpse of Ryan Stegman’s VENOM #1 art below!

Read AVENGERS #1, by Jason Aaron and Ed McGuinness, on May 2! Then catch VENOM #1, by Donny Cates and Ryan Stegman, on May 9!

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Jason Aaron signals the end for The Mighty Thor!

Jane Foster’s body decays. The War of the Realms rages. The Mangog roars. As these events culminate, a moment of reckoning arrives for The Mighty Thor.

With Asgardia on the brink of destruction—and the other realms soon to follow—the wielder of Mjolnir needs to make a choice: will she sacrifice her own life in exchange for those at risk on the other side of the universe? On February 21, witness the beginning of the end in writer Jason Aaron and artist Russell Dauterman’s MIGHTY THOR #704!

We sat down with Aaron for a wide-ranging two-part interview about this modern classic. Read the first half of the conversation here before jumping into Part Two below.

Marvel.com: Jason, tell us about the wonderful artists you’ve worked with on this storyline.

Jason Aaron: I’m tremendously proud of what those guys have put on paper over the course of this run. What Russell Dauterman and [colorist] Matt Wilson are doing on this arc is so great. And, no hyperbole, I genuinely think Russell is doing his best work yet; he just raises the bar with every new storyline. It’s been great to have Russell come back for #702; to have Matt and Russell work together with this arc. I’ve been so blown away with what they’ve done on this series. I wanted to do this finale right and not screw the story up, so it felt good to really just sit down and write those issues all in a row, something I haven’t had the luxury of doing in eight or ten years.

[Artist] James Harren did such a great job on issue #701. I’ve been wanting to work with James for a long time on MIGHTY THOR, actually. That fight between the Mangog and the War Thor was originally going to take place at the end of #700, which would have been just a seven-page  brutal beat-down. But our scheduling changed around a little bit and then we thought, with the art being so evocative, why don’t we just make that fight an entire issue? Initially James had just signed up to draw those pages in #700 but thankfully he was able to do #701 as well and I think he’s the perfect guy to draw that fight. He loves the Mangog and I love his version of the Mangog, so that was a huge thrill.

Marvel.com: How does it feel to see this end on the horizon?

Jason Aaron: This arc is something I knew we’ve been heading towards for a long time, and something I’ve both been looking forward to and dreading. On the one hand it’s a total joy, but it’s also tinged with sadness. I mean, I’m pretty sure that this issue #705 was the first comic that ever made me cry while I was writing it.

Marvel.com: There are going to be a lot of tear-stained issues out there in a couple months.

Jason Aaron: [Laughs]

Marvel.com: As this story comes to a close, I wanted to see if you have any meditations on the concept of “worthiness.” Obviously, you’ve had years of in-depth philosophical examination on that idea in this book…

Jason Aaron: I think I still have lots of thoughts on that idea and you can still see them playing out in this storyline. This is not my last storyline on THOR, so I think you’ll continue to see those themes playing out in the comics for the foreseeable future as long as I’m on the book.

I can see where the end point is for me on this series and I’ve always known what those last few stories will be. Some of it should be obvious and some will be a bit of a surprise.

Marvel.com: Do you ever ponder the concept when thinking about yourself? (Not that you should!)

Jason Aaron: Well, I try not to think of it that way and would never presume to say I’m worthy to follow in the footsteps of people like Jack Kirby and Walt Simonson, but I think, as a creator, the worthiness of your writing is for other people to decide.

A few years ago I was the world’s biggest fan of [writer] Garth Ennis’ PUNISHER MAX run—one of my favorite comic runs of all time. And when Marvel announced that he was leaving, I thought, well, I want to be the next guy. Even though it’s incredibly intimidating to follow something that you have such tremendous respect for, I knew I could never do what Garth had done, but I wanted to carry it on and continue to tell the story of that character in my own way.

That’s how I approach every job. You can’t stop to wonder whether you’re good enough to do this. You can’t get intimidated by that prospect or let it stop you from telling your own story. I certainly don’t feel as good as those creators who I idolize, but…man, I can’t wait to throw my hat in the ring every time.

The finale nears in MIGHTY THOR #704, by Jason Aaron and artist Russell Dauterman, on February 21!

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Jason Aaron sounds a death knell for The Mighty Thor!

As Mangog rampages through Asgardia, Thor—the last hope for the innocent lives at risk—lies dying from a cancer that has brought her body to the brink.

Jane Foster, faced with the responsibility of her heroic mantle and the sickness that it exacerbates, can see the end on the horizon. And as “The Death of the Mighty Thor” story arc continues, we can too. Today, issue #703 of writer Jason Aaron and artist Russell Dauterman’s MIGHTY THOR sets a grave course of events in action—and on February 21, issue #704 escalates the situation entirely.

We caught up with Aaron for an expansive two-part interview about the climax of this iconic series.

Marvel.com: Now that “The Death of the Mighty Thor” arc has begun, what’s going on in Jane’s head?

Jason Aaron: Well, in issue #702, we saw Odinson confront her and point blank tell her that she’s got to stop. He’s one of the few people who knows her secret and knows what being Thor is doing to her, so he directly confronted her and she seemed to understand and relent. But by the end of the book she had collapsed, so…as to what she’s facing and where her mind’s at, I think you’ll have to see issue to issue.

I will say that issue #703, directly and specifically lays out what her situation is, what her health looks like, and what that means going forward. By the next issue, the decision she faces is very clear.

Marvel.com: As a quick catch-up, what events have been leading to this moment in MIGHTY THOR?

Jason Aaron: Well, Jane Foster’s been Thor for the last two years or so and that whole time she’s been fighting some of the biggest, craziest enemies from around the various realms—most importantly Malekith the Accursed, who’s at the center of a War of the Realms that’s created chaos across the landscape.

So at the same time Thor’s been dealing with all of that, she’s had cancer as Jane Foster and the two kind of spiral together; being Thor is making her condition worse. See, every time she transforms into Thor, it neutralizes the cancer treatments she’s been receiving. And when she goes back to being Jane she’s worse than before. Jane knows all this, but she continues to pick that hammer up because somebody’s got to. Somebody has to do that job and try to stop this War of the Realms from spreading to every realm.

So she’s been dealing with all that, and then in issue #700—the beginning of this whole arc—the Mangog showed up. Mangog is one of the original Stan Lee and Jack Kirby villains and one of my favorite Thor villains.

Marvel.com: And even War Thor couldn’t stop him.

Jason Aaron: Right, he beat the crap out of War Thor. He defeated War Thor and tore the hammer apart.

Marvel.com: So what does the Mangog want?

Jason Aaron: The Mangog hates the gods and wants vengeance against them because he was born when Odin slaughtered an entire alien race. The Mangog exists as sort of the combined rage and hate of all those billion, billion beings channeled into one monster, out for justice. It’s come for revenge many times over the years and gets defeated, but always somehow comes back stronger than he was before.

We talked in issue #701 a little bit about why that is, what fuels the Mangog, and how he’s become a bigger thing than just a means of vengeance against Odin for that original sin…he’s sort of become a bigger force of nature, a cosmic judgment against all the gods. It remains ambiguous whether he’s justified in that vengeance or not, though, and very much ties into the themes going back to my first arc on the book and that initial idea: “Are the gods really worthy?”

Marvel.com: It’s so amazing that the thematic seeds of this finale were planted so long ago. Did you have the big story events planned from the very beginning or did they evolve organically over time?

Jason Aaron: Oh, I’ve known for years that the Mangog was coming. I always had plans to use him from the get-go and, if you go back over the course of my whole run, you’ll see references and teases to the Mangog going back several years. I’ve always known we were building towards that and I’ve known from the beginning of the Jane Foster Thor story that her story was building towards this very specific moment.

Marvel.com: What inspired your choice to bring the book to this point?

Jason Aaron: I mean, when I first started working on MIGHTY THOR, the first thing I did was sit back down and read those first Lee and Kirby issues from the very beginning. I think a lot of what I’ve done—the toys I’ve played with—has come from those issues. You know, I’d never read a lot of those stories before and the Mangog was one of the first things to jump out to me.

I wasn’t a huge THOR fan at first, if you can believe it.

Marvel.com: Really?!

Jason Aaron: I mean, I knew the Walter Simonson stuff, but that was my only reference, really. But when I read all the way through, I realized that the character that I was drawn towards was Mangog. And the more I read, the more I could see stuff that I really wanted to sink my teeth into.

I think the job is that, no matter the character, you don’t ever want to go into it and just preach to the choir, assuming everybody already knows why this character is cool. You want to show why this character is different from any other character in the Marvel Universe; what makes their adventures so unusual and exciting. I do try to keep that up in every new issue.

Marvel.com: Of course, this is very much Jane’s story, but I’m curious about the Odinson’s emotional reaction to all of this. If Jane dies, might he get his identity as Thor back? Does he want it back? He must be feeling a lot of conflict.

Jason Aaron: Well, he’s got a very conflicted relationship with the hammer and that idea of worthiness. But as far as his relationship with Jane goes, I think he’s just worried about his friend. Regaining that hammer isn’t even part of that equation right now—he just wants to try to save her life.

The thought about the Thor identity is definitely one of the questions going into this story. I would say most all of them will be answered by the end of it. Maybe not all of them, but a lot of them…just perhaps not in the way that you’d expect.

The end begins in Jason Aaron and artist Russell Dauterman’s MIGHTY THOR #703—available now! Then continue the tale in issue #704 on February 21!

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What price will Jane Foster pay in the penultimate showdown with Mangog?

The murderous Mangog has set himself on a collision course with the God of Thunder–could a story titled “The Death of the Mighty Thor” end any other way than in tragedy?

With the fate of Asgard in jeopardy, Jane Foster takes up the hammer against her formidable foe in MIGHTY THOR #705, available March 21 from the creative team of writer Jason Aaron and artist Russell Dauterman. Thor has run the gamut of her predecessor’s greatest foes since the start of this ominous arc in MIGHTY THOR #700. By the time she gets to Mangog, our truly Worthy hero may be operating low on lightning and unable to fully bring the thunder.

“This is it folks,” teases series editor Wil Moss. “The big showdown between Thor and Mangog. The penultimate chapter of ‘The Death of the Mighty Thor.’ Jason Aaron and Russell Dauterman have been building to this issue for over three years, and you absolutely do not want to miss this. You may think you know where things are going, but I promise you do not.”

Jane Foster faces her most devastating foe as Mangog comes calling and the Goddess of Thunder has no option but to answer. Find out what happens when the unyielding meets the unstoppable on March 21 in MIGHTY THOR #705–and take a sneak peek at  awesome Dauterman art from issues #703–out January 17–and #704–coming February 21–as well as the cover to #705 in the pages above!

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Jason Aaron and Roland Boschi rev up the action in Ghost Rider!

Every day this month, a new supernatural character or story from the Marvel Universe gets a spooky spotlight leading up to Halloween!

You‘d think that discovering you’d been working for angels instead of demons would be good news, but then again, you’re not Johnny Blaze. Everyone’s favorite flaming skull motorcycle enthusiast came to understand that an angel named Zadkiel had been pulling his strings this whole time before Jason Aaron took over the GHOST RIDER series in 2008. That gave the future DOCTOR STRANGE scribe a great place to start and a clear mission for his star: get Zadkiel.

For Aaron’s first arc, starting with GHOST RIDER #20 and running through #23, the writer and artist Roland Boschi set the tone for one of the most wild, violent, and supernaturally stacked runs on the character to date that felt like a great mix of horror and grindhouse action. Not a fan of having the wool pulled over his fiery eye sockets, Blaze decided that he needed to have a face-to-face with this Zadkiel character. While traveling through New Beulah, out hero heard about a kid named Lucas who had a near death experience and came back terrified of angels. That seemed like a good enough place to start, so Johnny paid the boy a visit in the hospital.

Before he could even talk to the young man, Blaze ran into a mountain of a woman who told him to kick rocks. He listened for about a minute and then drove his bike straight through the doors, grabbed Lucas and took off with him. Not to be outdone, the head nurse ordered her underlings to grab a ton of guns and follow them. After getting a night’s sleep, Lucas explained that, when he briefly died he found the gates to Heaven locked and Zadkiel looking to succeed where Lucifer failed. Lucas even remembered working on their siege engines until he returned to the land of the living.

Ghost Rider (2006) #20

Ghost Rider (2006) #20

  • Published: February 13, 2008
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 07, 2008
  • Rating: Parental Advisory
  • Writer: Jason Aaron
  • Cover Artist: Marko Djurdjevic
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Before Blaze could leave the kid and go off on his own mission, the nurses—who served Zadkiel—shot Lucas in the side. They tried running off again, but their pursuers caught up and nearly destroyed the Rider with a drop of Zadkiel’s fiery rain; howerre they made the mistake of threatening the Rider’s bike and he went nuclear on them. The chase continued with Johnny accidentally leading them all to Highway 18 which happened to be haunted by the ghosts of a bunch of cannibals that hadn’t given up their eating habits. These ghouls proved powerful enough to not only separate Lucas from his new friend, but also give the Rider a run for his money.

The last issue of the arc ended with a huge collision between Ghost Rider, the nurses, a bus, and the only living member of the family of ghost cannibals! At the end, just about everything went wrong, but Johnny Blaze rode away with a bit more information that he’d use to get his revenge in later issues of Aaron’s tenure.

Fright Fact

In this story we just begin to see how Blaze’s fellow Ghost Rider, Danny Ketch, played into the larger story. The character took over as the Spirit of Vengeance in the 1990-launching GHOST RIDER series. Eventually, Blaze returned to active duty leaving Ketch behind. As we found out in Aaron’s series, Ketch missed the power so much that he agreed to work for Zadkiel in order to regain the mantle of Ghost Rider. Danny even went so far as to gather a group of villains like Orb, Doghead, Death Ninja, and Blackout to aid in their efforts. Eventually he and Johnny worked things out, though, as you can see in the endcap to this epic, a limited series called GHOST RIDERS: HEAVEN’S ON FIRE.

Tomorrow, the X-Men find themselves facing off against a psychic vampire and an army of mostly dead mutants!

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