Travel the timestream to learn the true story of the master villain!

Since the early days of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, Kang the Conqueror has agitated the Avengers and then some with his mastery of multiple eras and desire to add the Marvel Universe to his empire. On November 14, the time tyrant takes on a new role as central antagonist in the “LEGO Marvel Super Heroes 2,” creating a campaign that crisscrosses all reality and space.

Before you play the game, discover the story behind this agent of chronological chaos with the History of Kang!

Though shrouded in mystery, the origins of the time-despot known as Kang may be pieced together not only from records of his clashes with Earth’s many champions, but also his own words. Once assembled, a picture of the so-called “Conqueror” stands out in stark relief, an ongoing saga of ambition, greed, and tyranny.

A man named Nathaniel Richards, who claimed to be a scholar born in the year 3000, utilized a time-travel device created by Victor Von Doom, a supposed ancestor of his, to flee a future world that may or may not come to pass. Setting the device to whisk him away to a time nearly 6000 years before his own, Richards arrived in the land and era of the pharaohs of Earth’s ancient Egypt and fashioned a dynasty for himself. As Rama-Tut, he held the people of the region in thrall while he attempted to subjugate the mutant En Sabah Nur to do his twisted bidding.

Rama-Tut’s rule stretched on through the years until the time-traveling Fantastic Four landed in his kingdom from the future and challenged his authority. The faux-pharaoh made the famous heroes his slaves, but their ingenuity and will to be free broke the despot’s grip on them and he fled into an alternate dimension, leaving only vague evidence of his reign as Rama-Tut behind. The Fantastic Four returned to their own time, unsure of exactly who they fought or if they’d ever clash with him again.

Richards traveled through space and time, licking his wounds and plotting his revenge. During this period he came across none other then Doctor Doom, lost just outside the orbit of the planet Jupiter around the sun. Together, the two villains suggested they might possibly be the same person, not merely related, and made a pact to not endanger each other by battling the Fantastic Four as a single unit. The future-Kang then returned Doom to Earth and continued on his way.

Fantastic Four (1961) #19

Fantastic Four (1961) #19

  • Published: October 10, 1963
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

An accident involving the energy that powered his ship sent Richards hurtling farther into the future then he intended, where he discovered warring armies on Earth and the opportunity to refashion himself as The Scarlet Centurion. Under the cloak of a supposed chronal imbalance in the timestream, the tyrant forced the Avengers to fight an earlier version of the team from an alternate timeline, but lost to Earth’s Mightiest Heroes in the end.

Unhappy with his unsuccessful forays into time and smarting from battle with those who opposed his advances, Richards concentrated on an ultimate persona to operate under, and thus Kang the Conqueror rose up to dominance over all. For his first, real campaign as Kang, he turned his attention back to the Avengers at a time when their limited experience as a well-honed fighting unit might serve him well…

Check Out: FANTASTIC FOUR #19, FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #2, AVENGERS ANNUAL #2, RISE OF APOCALYPSE #14

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The Conqueror faces multiples generations of heroes in 'Marvel's Avengers: Ultron Revolution' clip, airing Sunday morning!

Heroes unite across multiple generations to battle Kang in a clip from “Marvel’s Avengers: Ultron Revolution”! Watch the clip above and tune in to an all-new “Marvel’s Avengers: Ultron Revolution,” airing Sunday at 8:30 AM ET on Disney XD.

When the Avengers find themselves stuck in the 30th century, Kang’s home turf, the heroes fall victim to a massive disadvantage of unfamiliarity! Luckily, once Kang reveals his plans to destroy the super heroes, Earth’s Mightiest Heroes band together with the heroes of the 30th century to attack Kang in hopes of turning the tides of battle. See the action in the clip above!

Catch a brand-new “Marvel’s Avengers: Ultron Revolution” airing Sunday at 8:30 AM ET on Disney XD! Stay tuned to Marvel.com for all the latest news and updates on your favorite Marvel animated series.

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The time-traveling tyrant terrorizes Thor in a 'Marvel's Avengers: Ultron Revolution' clip, airing Sunday morning!

Everyone’s favorite 30th century warlord Kang comes to the present to destroy the Avengers in a clip from “Marvel’s Avengers: Ultron Revolution”! Watch the clip above and tune in to “Marvel’s Avengers: Ultron Revolution” this Sunday at 8:30 AM ET on Disney XD.

When the Avengers discover that the nefarious A.I.M. has found a way to travel to the future to procure highly advanced weapons, they learn that the evil organization has brought back more than just weapons! With Kang the Conquerer hot on A.I.M.’s heels, the powerful villain realizes his opportunity to destroy the Avengers once and for all. See Thor’s attempts to take down the villain in the clip above!

Catch an all-new “Marvel’s Avengers: Ultron Revolution” this Sunday at 8:30 AM ET on Disney XD! Stay tuned to Marvel.com for all the latest news and updates on your favorite Marvel animated series.

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The Avengers respond to Cap's call for help and end up on an adventure through time!

Every day we celebrate Captain America’s 75th anniversary by looking deep into the Marvel Unlimited archives and going through some of Steve Rogers’ most thrilling adventures. Happy diamond anniversary Sentinel of Liberty!

If Captain America calls for help, you just know something big must be going on.

Hawkeye, Goliath, Wasp, and Black Panther understand this as they head to an ancient castle at the behest of their sometime leader in a story that begins in AVENGERS #56 and finishes up in AVENGERS ANNUAL #2 from 1968. Roy Thomas wrote both issues with John Buscema drawing the first and Don Heck and Werner Roth handling the annual.

Avengers (1963) #56

Avengers (1963) #56

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Soon enough, Cap explains that they’re in Dr. Doom’s old castle—originally seen in FANTASTIC FOUR #5—so they can utilize his time machine to travel back to the day Bucky died. After all this time in the present, Steve questions whether Bucky truly perished in the explosion set up by Baron Zemo.

Wasp stays back to control the machine while the others head back to the day and relive the terrible events. While there, the heroes materialize even though they should only exist as specters thanks to some mysterious machinations in both times. After reliving the events once again, Cap thinks to himself, “I can be sure he’s gone…forever! And that is a fact I’ll just have to learn to live with!”

The group, thinking they’ve returned to their own time in AVENGERS ANNUAL #2, head to the mansion only to find a version of the original Avengers sitting in their seats! The team eventually learns, thanks to an appearance by the Watcher, that this alternate dimension features the appearance of the Scarlet Centurion—also known as Kang the Conqueror—who kept the original Avengers line-up together in an effort to put down the potential threat of all other super beings, good and evil.

Avengers Annual (1967) #2

Avengers Annual (1967) #2

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Cap’s group eventually triumphs over the doppelgangers and returns to their correct plane of existence, but with no memories of the encounter. At the end, Earth’s Mightiest Heroes offer their condolences to the Star-Spangled Avenger for the assumed loss of his partner. “At least our trip to the past proved that Bucky truly died then…may his soul rest in peace,” he says reiterating his point from the previous issue. “I’ve got to learn to accept that—‘cause that’s the way he’d have wanted it!”

At peace with the situation, Captain America continues with his life assuming his partner perished which makes it all the more shocking when he reappears decades later.

Cap Declassified

From Kang’s perspective, this battle with the Avengers actually takes place before his first throw-down with the team because the Scarlet Centurion returns to his own time where he refashions himself into the Conqueror. In AVENGERS #8 from 1964, the time-traveling despot appears to face off against Cap, Iron Man, Thor, Giant-Man, Wasp, and even Rick Jones’ Teen Brigade. The villain easily captures the first four leaving the others to figure out how to stop him kicking off an adversarial relationship that continues to cause trouble for both as the years go on. 

Next, the drug problem hits home in CAPTAIN AMERICA #372-378 by Mark Gruenwald and Ron Lim.

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Charles Soule and Steve McNiven continue the saga of Medusa and company with All-New All-Different additions!

Writer Charles Soule and artist Steve McNiven add a new chapter to the saga of Marvel’s most unique heroes in the upcoming UNCANNY INHUMANS ongoing series, rolling out of the events of Secret Wars.

The creative team promises an all-new look at the Inhumans, their royal family, and their place in the world—one they share with a certain merry band of mutants.

Marvel.com: Charles, in what ways will UNCANNY INHUMANS turn the story upside down? What’s going to surprise readers the most?

Charles Soule: I’m not going to give away all the many twists and turns in the story, [but] I will say that we’re designing this as the next huge chapter in the new Inhumans story. It picks up many threads that were laid down in what I consider “Season One,” issues #1-14 plus the Annual of the INHUMAN series I did over the past year or so with Ryan Stegman, Joe Madureira, Pepe Larraz, and Andre Lima Araujo, as well as the rest of the amazing talent I worked with on that series. INHUMAN was a big, swirling story with a bunch of characters, some new, some old. It had a pretty specific ending, but many plot points were purposely left open.

UNCANNY INHUMANS will let us pick up on a bunch of those, as well as introduce new ideas. It’s huge-scale super hero storytelling at its most epic. New super-powered people with Inhuman DNA are still popping up all over the world, and the whole Marvel Universe continues to evolve in the face of that and other challenges. It’s a great time to be reading the stories.

Marvel.com: There’s romance in the air: what do Medusa and Johnny Storm see in each other? Is this a love that can last?

Charles Soule: We’ll have to wait and see; and the specifics of Medusa, Queen of the Inhumans, and Johnny Storm, aka the Human Torch, longtime member of the Fantastic Four, getting together will be teased out for a bit. All we really know is that they fulfill an emotional need for each other they weren’t getting anywhere else. They’re a pretty fun couple to write, honestly. Johnny’s a smooth talker; funny, lots of laughs, that sort of thing. Medusa’s a monarch: regal, and while I wouldn’t call her reserved, she definitely isn’t someone I’d call a party girl, either. They have more in common than you might think, though. Like I said, they’re a fun couple.

Marvel.com: Which leads us to the current rift between Medusa and Black Bolt. What caused it?

Charles Soule: A lot of this was covered in the INHUMAN series, particularly issues #9-12. Honestly, though, it’s been a long time coming. If you look back through Inhuman-related stories over the last five to 10 years, Black Bolt’s been one hell of a king, but sort of a crappy husband to Medusa. He married a ton of other ladies—which were all marriages of convenience, and Inhumans don’t run their society along the same lines we do, but you know that had to sting—he seemingly abandoned Medusa at her time of greatest need after the fall of the Inhuman city of Attilan during the big Infinity event a few years back, and left her to try to preserve its people and Inhuman culture, as well as dealing with all the new members of the Inhuman race popping up all over the planet.

So, a little while ago, when Black Bolt rolled into New Attilan—the new city founded by Medusa to serve as sanctuary for new and old Inhumans alike—and tried to take his throne back…it didn’t go well. Medusa and Black Bolt are currently very much estranged. We’ll see if they ever get back together, but right now they are, as they say, “on a break.”

Marvel.com: UNCANNY INHUMANS has an X-element to it; up until this point, what’s the relationship been like between mutants and the Inhumans?

Charles Soule: I would say it’s been fairly cordial, with the occasional hot spot, just the way most super hero relationships tend to work in the Marvel Universe. Inhumans and mutants have gotten along, more or less, but part of that has been due to the fact that until very recently, Inhumans were completely isolationist. They stayed up in their hidden city of Attilan, interacting with the “regular” world only rarely. That’s all been blown to hell recently, with Inhumans popping up over the globe. Their territory is expanding, so to speak, and it’s inevitable that they’re going to rub up against other heroes and villains, including the mutants.

When we pick up the story with UNCANNY INHUMANS, however, it seems like things have gone very wrong somehow. The specifics are yet to be revealed, but I would characterize it as sort of a cold war that occasionally goes hot. Medusa’s not thrilled about the situation—honestly, would you want the mutants mad at you? She’s trying to put her nation back together, and the idea of having this very powerful group mad at her is not ideal. We’ll just have to see how it all goes.

Marvel.com: What’s Hank McCoy’s role in the book?

Charles Soule: Hank McCoy, aka Beast, is living with the Inhumans on New Attilan when we pick up in issue #1. He’s sort of a liaison between mutantkind and the Inhumans, working towards mutual understanding. Of course, it’s more complex and awesome than that, but let’s just say that Beast has a very particular reason for “breaking” with the rest of the mutants and hanging out with Medusa and crew, and we’ll find out pretty early what that is—although as I said, it’s more complex than perhaps it seems at first glance.

Marvel.com: And what kind of new Inhumans will we see take lead roles?

Charles Soule: Reader—blind guy who makes anything he reads via Braille tabs on his belt real, with a cool seeing-eye dog named Forey—has a huge part in the first arc, and Iso is very vital as well. I have big plans for a new Inhuman character I introduced in the Free Comic Book Day story named Grid, a guy from India who can see and manipulate electromagnetic fields. They’re all part of the ongoing story, though: Inferno, Flint, Naja and of course, good old Frank McGee.

Marvel. Com: How does Kang fit into the saga?

Charles Soule: As we saw in the UNCANNY INHUMANS #0 issue, Black Bolt gave his son Ahura to Kang the Conqueror for safekeeping when he realized that the Secret Wars Incursions would destroy the world. It was a desperate move; Kang is clearly a bad, bad guy, but his time-travel abilities would allow him to take Ahura back to the past, thus keeping him alive even as the rest of the Marvel Universe was destroyed. Black Bolt was trying to be a good father, but as tends to happen in comics, things got complicated. As far as we know, Kang still has Ahura when we open in issue #1, and Black Bolt’s not the kind of guy who would let his son be raised by a time-traveling despot if he has anything to say about it.

And he does. He does have something to say about it. Which, considering the fact that Black Bolt creates something like a nuclear blast every time he speaks, might not be all that great for Kang. On the other hand, Kang’s weapon is time itself. I think it’s fair to say that literally everything is at stake for the Inhumans in the first arc of UNCANNY INHUMANS.

Marvel.com: Lastly, why is Steve McNiven, in your opinion, the perfect artist for this book?

Charles Soule: Steve is the perfect artist for every book. He excels at giving a sense of reality to even the most exotic super hero action, and I think a lot of that is in the faces. It’s very clear in every panel what each character is thinking and feeling; Steve is an excellent “actor,” so to speak. In a title like UNCANNY INHUMANS, where we have family drama and royal intrigue mixed up with characters from vastly different backgrounds working and fighting together, alongside massive super hero action, I suspect it could all easily go off the rails. Steve never lets things teeter, though; it’s all locked down and incredible, and I hope I get to keep working with him forever.

Marvel.com: Steve, your turn: What’s it like working with Charles as a collaborator? What does he do that as an artist you love?

Steve McNiven: Working with Charles? In a word: fantastic! The guy is the real deal, a writer who can do it all, and loves to collaborate. His scripts are pitch-perfect, and allow you to really exploit his storytelling, making you look much better than you actually are. What more could you ask for? How about speed? I have never waited for a script from him, and often get two or three ahead of time. If you are an artist and you get a chance to work with him I guarantee you’ll agree with everything I’m saying here.

Marvel.com: So far, which of the series cast members might present the greatest artistic challenge for you? And which are just joys to draw? 

Steve McNiven: I’d probably say Black Bolt presents the greatest artistic challenge for me as he can’t talk. Or rather he could talk but it would vaporize everything around him. So it’s all physical acting with him and that’s a bit of a challenge, but one that’s so much fun to attack. But Medusa’s the one character I love to draw because I just have such a good time drawing her hair!

Marvel.com: And what do you like drawing better, human-looking humans, or the monsters and creatures?

Steve McNiven: I have been known to love drawing old people, as it is so much easier to exaggerate their expressions than it is with the stereotypically good looking superheroes. Same goes for the creatures and monsters. You can get across a wide range of emotions when you get to exaggerate expressions, something that is a bit more difficult to do when you are known as a “realistic” artist.

UNCANNY INHUMANS by Charles Soule and Steve McNiven sets Medusa, Black Bolt, Kang, and more on a collision course later this year! Look for the latest All-New All-Different Marvel news here on Marvel.com and via our social channels!

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Striaght out of New York Comic Con we have the trailer for Marvel Contest of Champions, in App Stores December 2014!

At the Marvel booth (#1354) at New York Comic Con, Kabam unveiled a hands-on demo for “Marvel Contest of Champions”! To celebrate the release of the demo, we have a brand new trailer that highlights the huge battles that can take place between your favorite Marvel characters.

In “Marvel Contest of Champions,” the Collector has collected the biggest heroes and meanest villains to compete against one another. Watch Gamora fight Ronan in the Kyln, Hulk take on Wolverine in the Savage Land, and Deadpool square off against the Punisher in Avengers Tower! Even Marvel villains like Thanos and Kang the Conqueror collide in an attempt to destroy the Marvel universe.

“Marvel Contest of Champions” is an immersive, high-action super hero combat game for mobile devices. Players fight their way through iconic locations from the Marvel Universe and collect their favorite Marvel super heroes and villains like Iron Man, Captain America, Spider-Man and Thor to build their ultimate team of champions.  The storyline and character bios were penned by fan-favorite Marvel comic book writer Sam Humphries.

Marvel Contest of Champions is slated to release on App Stores worldwide December 2014. For the latest game info, visit www.facebook.com/MarvelContestofChampions. Keep your eyes on Marvel.com for all the latest on the Marvel universe!

For all the latest from New York Comic Con 2014, including live interviews, panel recaps, a full photo gallery, and more, visit marvel.com/nycc2014 for our full coverage, brought to you by Marvel Contest of Champions from Kabam!

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Kang the Conqueror debuted way back in 1964...or maybe 1963?

The time-traveling conqueror known as Kang has been tormenting the Marvel Universe for thousands of years. With his futuristic weaponry—and incredibly snazzy green tunic and thigh high purple boots—Kang’s been more than a match for pretty much every super hero team around. And thanks to his mastery of time travel, the blue-faced one was able to travel back to ancient Egypt and manipulate Apocalypse before the immortal mutant grew into adulthood. 

Avengers (1963) #8

Avengers (1963) #8

  • Published: September 10, 1964
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Kang first appeared 50 years ago this month in AVENGERS #8 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Okay, Kang first appeared 50 years ago this month; his alter ego Rama-Tut first appeared about a year before that in FANTASTIC FOUR #19. And, well, then there’s Immortus, who will appear for the first time in AVENGERS #10, but we’re talking about Kang right now! Focus!

The issue opens up with the Avengers making their way to Tony Stark’s mansion amidst a crowd of excited onlookers and autograph seekers. Upon arrival, they answer a red alert call from the Pentagon and first witness the mighty power…of Kang! He’s colorful and he’s got a thirst for conquest! The Avengers rush to confront the time-traveler at his ship’s intrusive parking spot.

Art from Avengers #8

Art from Avengers #8

You know Kang’s gonna be trouble because the Avengers step up on him and he doesn’t even feel the need to get up out of his anti-grav recliner. No one can interfere with Kang’s desire to chillax! After displaying a formidable knack for not allowing the Avengers to mess with him, Kang starts to monologue.

Art from Avengers #8

Art from Avengers #8

Kang hails from the year 3000, which makes him around -986 years old right now, but he traveled back in time to the year 2950 B.C.—nearly 5,000 years in our past. He took on the identity of Pharaoh Rama-Tut before splitting to go back home, but a mechanical failure left him stranded in the even further future. Kang decided to make the most of his situation and used his cunning intellect to build up an empire and steal a whole mess of tech from those future people—tech that he then used to deflect mighty Mjolnir!

Art from Avengers #8

Art from Avengers #8

Kang captured most of the Avengers immediately, leaving only the Wasp and teenager Rick Jones free to enact a rescue plan. While the Wasp made a run back to Henry Pym’s lab to grab a super blaster, Rick Jones and his Teen Brigade went about infiltrating Kang’s mobile fortress. Turns out, they just had to ask.

Art from Avengers #8

Art from Avengers #8

Once inside, the Teen Brigade sabotaged Kang’s operations and bought the Wasp enough time to drop the laser blaster into Giant-Man’s hands.

Art from Avengers #8

Art from Avengers #8

With Kang’s uniform and technology rotting and decaying right off of him, the Avengers banded together to deliver the finishing blow to the would-be conqueror. Kang high-tailed it out of the 20th Century, thus ensuring his eventual return to confuse and combat the Avengers at a future…or past…date!

Check out Kang’s current attempt at conquest in the pages of UNCANNY AVENGERS!

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Find out which bad guys from the birth of the Marvel Universe took our top honors!

All year long on Marvel.com, we’re celebrating Marvel’s 75th anniversary, and to fully appreciate the scope of that history, you need to go back to where it all began.

As anybody knows, a good hero only becomes great when they go up against insurmountable obstacles, meaning their antagonists better be every bit as formidable and intriguing as the champions they menace.

While the Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, the Hulk, the Avengers and more burst on the scene in the 1960’s, they may have been forgotten had they simply faced the nameless saboteurs and spies of the Golden Age; instead, villains with not just awe-inspiring powers but multi-faceted motives, in many cases as sympathetic as any character’s, rose to challenge this pantheon.

This week, we count down our top 10 Marvel villains to debut during the 1960’s. Have your own thoughts? Let us know on Twitter using the hash tag #Marvel75!

Kang

Kang

9. KANG
First Appearance:
AVENGERS (1963) #8
Why He’s #9:
“Kang the Conqueror’s first appearance was also his third appearance, because that’s just the kind of guy he is, and was, and will be. The time-travelling villain comes from a far-future utopia that’s just too boring for a man of his ambitions, so Kang travelled far and wide across the time stream, becoming Rama-Tut in his first and second appearances, and then Scarlet Centurion, Immortus, and even the teen hero Iron Lad. But first and foremost he is Kang, a zealous megalomaniac who was so inspired by Doctor Doom that he adopted a similar look with a mask and puffy green tunic.” – Andrew Wheeler
Digital Comics Spotlight:
AVENGERS (1963) #23

Mephisto

Mephisto

MEPHISTO
First Appearance:
SILVER SURFER (1968) #3
Why He’s Also #9:
“The greatest trick Mephisto ever pulled was convincing the world that the fiery little pocket dimension he governed is Hell, and he its dark prince. That wicked widow’s peak first appeared in the winter of 1968, eager to prey upon the consternation of a Silver Surfer ready to sever all ties with humanity. An ever opportunistic negotiator, Mephisto made a name for himself as the ultimate broker in souls. His potency as a villain stems from his dealings with countless Marvel heroes at the lowest points in their lives, seizing upon their despair to clinch on sadistic deals, rending the fabric of time and rewriting history. Many so-called demons and hellish despots cut their sulfurous trail through Marvel lore, but Mephisto reigns as the most cunning and manipulative fiend to ever set off the sprinklers.” – Paul Montgomery
Digital Comics Spotlight:
SILVER SURFER (1968) #8

Come back tomorrow to see two more entries on the list, share your thoughts on Twitter with the hash tag #Marvel75 and keep up on Marvel’s 75th anniversary celebration at marvel.com/75

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Havok is in a race against time to save Planet X in these preview pages by Daniel Acuà±a!

Kang the Conqueror has returned, and he’s brought some friends! This week, the blockbuster “Avenge the Earth” arc continues in UNCANNY AVENGERS #19, from the “New York Times”-best selling creative team of Rick Remender and Daniel Acuña! Assembled from the splintered fringes of time and space comes Kang’s Chronos Corps, and they’ve arrived on Planet X with a terrible offer. Now, Havok must reunite the surviving members of the Uncanny Avengers in a race against time to save the planet! But with Magneto and his human hunting X-Force closing in, how far is Havok willing to go to save all he holds dear? No fan can afford to miss the epic UNCANNY AVENGERS #19, on-sale this week!

UNCANNY AVENGERS #19 (FEB140716)
Written by RICK REMENDER
Art & Cover by DANIEL ACUÑA
Variant Cover by AGUSTIN ALESSIO (FEB140717)
FOC – 03/31/14 On-Sale – 04/23/14

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Marvel.com reveals our top 25 list of the nastiest bad guys from the past year!

In 2013, the heroes of the Marvel Universe found themselves as ever measured by the threats they faced. Whether evil came from deep space or the urban streets, villains had a big year.

To send last year out with a bang, Marvel.com will be counting down our top 25 villains of 2013, as selected by staffers and freelancers. Got your own thoughts on the matter? We’d love to hear them, so send them our way on Twitter @Marvel, using the hashtag #Marvel2013!

Read part one and check out the list so far…

25. CASSANDRA NOVA
24. NUKE
23. CORVUS GLAIVE
22. CAROLINE LE FEY
21. DIMITRIOS

Untitled Image

Untitled Image

20. SABRETOOTH
First Appearance: IRON FIST (1975) #14
Where He Appeared in 2013: ALL-NEW X-MEN, WOLVERINE & THE X-MEN
Why He’s #20: “For years, despite his vicious path of destruction and formidable reputation, Sabretooth has been seen as little more than a sadistic thug; a great henchman, but little more. Since returning from seeming death, Victor Creed has proven his capacity for more, taking over the Hand and serving as its most effective leader in some time. Of course aside from that and aiding Mystique in her efforts against the X-Men, Sabretooth still found time to torture Wolverine on a more personal level—he’s the world’s nastiest multi-tasker.” – Ben Morse
Digital Comic Spotlight: ALL-NEW X-MEN #9

Doctor Doom by John Romita Jr.

Doctor Doom by John Romita Jr.

19. DOCTOR DOOM
First Appearance: FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #5
Where He Appeared in 2013: FANTASTIC FOUR, FF
Why He’s #19: “The quest for absolute power stands as Victor Von Doom’s all-consuming passion, an unquenchable desire to prove himself superior above all others and crush those who disagree beneath his heel. Recently, Doom came into conflict not with his hated enemy Reed Richards and the Fantastic Four directly, but with their temporary replacements and the Future Foundation. Of course, the Latverian tyrant transformed into Doom the Annihilating Conqueror, but being the ultimate power in the universe doesn’t actually guarantee success. And so, Doom waits and smiles beneath his iron mask and dreams of the future.” – Jim Beard
Digital Comic Spotlight: FF (2012) #8

Magnitron

Magnitron

17. MAGNITRON
First Appearance: MARVEL SUPER HEROES #12
Where He Appeared in 2013: AVENGERS ASSEMBLE, CAPTAIN MARVEL
Why He’s #17: “Just as Captain Marvel felt confident in her new role as Earth’s pre-eminent star-punching Avenger, the Kree commander Yon-Rogg—the villain that inadvertently gave her powers—came back to haunt her. Wishing to drop a full-scale replica of a fallen Kree city right on top of New York, the mad Magnitron threw versions of Carol Danvers’ most hated enemies at her to keep her off balance while he gathered his strength. In the end, only Captain Marvel could save New York from Magnitron’s plan, a deed that ended up costing her very identity.” – Brett White
Digital Comic Spotlight: CAPTAIN MARVEL (2012) #13

Kang by John Romita Jr.

Kang by John Romita Jr.


KANG
First Appearance: AVENGERS (1963) #8
Where He Appeared in 2013: UNCANNY AVENGERS
Why He’s Also #17: “Nobody plays the long game like Kang the Conqueror. Most recently—with ‘recently’ being a tough term to define—he spirited the Apocalypse Twins into the far future, raising them amongst concentration camps and subjecting them to incomparable horrors before they escaped to the present. But did they actually break free of their tormentor’s grasp? Did they come up with their current campaign against humanity or should Kang be held responsible? Already the time-traveling despot has begun to gather allies from across all realities, but to what end? Kang always leaves more questions than answers, but be assured one thing: he’s a villain to be feared.” – Ben Morse
Digital Comic Spotlight: UNCANNY AVENGERS #8AU

Apex by Dave Johnson

Apex by Dave Johnson

15. APEX
First Appearance: AVENGERS ARENA #1
Where She Appeared in 2013: AVENGERS ARENA
Why She’s #15: “Arcade may have the mastermind behind Avengers Area, the madman who filled it with deathtraps and danger, but did even he realize that one of the biggest threats in the game would turn out to be Katy Bashir, aka Apex? A student of the Braddock Academy, Katy has the power to manipulate machines, but perhaps a greater gift for manipulating people. If it hadn’t been for her brother Tim, with whom she forcibly shared a body, she might easily have emerged victorious in the arena. Apex, so aptly named, proved very nearly the top of the food chain.” – Andrew Wheeler
Digital Comic Spotlight: AVENGERS ARENA #9

451

451

451
First Appearance: IRON MAN (2012) #6
Where He Appeared in 2013: IRON MAN
Why He’s Also #15: “This year we met 451, a rogue Rigellian recorder, from a race of sentient robots tasked with exploration and observation. Their data normally transmits back to the Rigellians, deleted from the individual recorders, but 451 remembered all that he had seen, and eventually decided that passive observation would not be enough. In a plan lasting decades, he maneuvered to manipulate the Stark family and collect a series of powerful artifacts, with the end goal of creating a human who could pilot an ancient and powerful armor known as the Godkiller. He expected that person to be Tony Stark, not realizing that Tony had been adopted and the child 451 had modified remained hidden. Failing after such a long time fighting his own programming not to interfere, 451 decided to end his own existence and delete himself from reality. Tony Stark prevented the deletion, and took possession of 451’s body, as well as his immense body of knowledge collected over the eons.” – Ryan Haupt 
Digital Comic Spotlight: IRON MAN (2012) #9

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