See how issue #3 of the new series ties into the cosmic event!

After finding the magic of planet Earth depleted, Doctor Strange takes to the stars.

There, he expects to find alien sorcerers and mystical artifacts, but in DOCTOR STRANGE #3, he finds something much more powerful…an Infinity Stone!

This July, the Super-Skrull has the Time Stone, and Doctor Strange can’t let him keep it in this special INFINITY WARS lead-in!

Written by Mark Waid with art by Jesus Saiz, Stephen Strange joins the escalating action of this cosmic event.

As series editor Nick Lowe describes the action, things are going to get messy pretty quickly for the mage. “As if you didn’t need enough reasons to pick up DOCTOR STRANGE #1 next week, did we mention that issue #3 is part of the set up for INFINITY WARS? A nearly de-powered Doctor Strange ends up face-to-face with the Super Skrull, which puts Stephen in deep doo-doo. And Strange doesn’t even know the Skrull has an Infinity Stone. So I guess this is the last issue of DOCTOR STRANGE?”

On July 4, journey across the stars with the INFINITY WARS lead-in DOCTOR STRANGE #3, by Mark Waid and Jesus Saiz!

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Mark Waid tells a new story with original artwork from Jack Kirby!

The main story in CAPTAIN AMERICA #700, by storytellers Mark Waid and Chris Samnee, colorist Matthew Wilson, and letterer Joe Caramagna, serves as a powerful culmination of this creative team’s run alongside the Sentinel of Liberty. But these all-star artists aren’t the only ones getting in on the landmark issue action! The Cap’s co-creator, Jack “King” Kirby himself, contributes to the action as well in a special bonus story written by Waid with colors by Wilson!

In the back of issue #700, Mark Waid took on the mammoth task of repurposing original Jack Kirby and Frank Giacoia art from TALES OF SUSPENSE with a brand-new Steve Rogers story. To get the all the details, we caught up with the writer to ask how he went about creating this cross-generational collaboration.

Marvel.com: How did you come up with the idea for this one-of-a-kind story?

Mark Waid: I’ve been wanting to do something like this for a long, long time. In the earliest days of the MARVEL ESSENTIALS black-and-white volumes, I came to realize just how many Silver Age and Bronze Age comics artists produced consistent and reliable work in an old-fashioned six-panel grid. To be honest, there weren’t that many who did huge, long, hundreds-of-pages uninterrupted runs in the 1960s and 1970s—John Buscema, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Gene Colan, a few others. But I’d always wondered what it would be like to redialogue their material to create new stories—especially if I could pick-and-choose specific panels to build brand-new pages.

Marvel.com: Can you tell us what your process was like?

Mark Waid: Way more complicated than you’d think.

STEP ONE: I had to pick a character, but that was a gimme seeing as how this was going to be for CAPTAIN AMERICA #700.

STEP TWO: Before I even began choosing the artwork, I had to settle on one and only one penciller/inker team for visual consistency. This immediately winnowed down the number of available Captain America pages pretty substantially—inkers like Syd Shores and Dick Ayers were fine craftsmen, but their work was either too sparse (comparatively) or too centered on very specific scenes (say, World War II battle scenes) that would be difficult to weave into a modern narrative. In the end, based on the volume of collaboration as much as anything, I opted to pull from the Jack Kirby and Frank Giacoia stories from TALES OF SUSPENSE.

STEP THREE: I had to narrow the available Kirby/Giacoia artwork down even further, in search of panels that had word balloons and captions that didn’t hide important background art and thus wouldn’t require much if any retouching by the production department. I didn’t want to simply “white out” existing balloons and replace that dialogue—that would mean having not only to write dialogue but then to fit it within specific spaces on the page, with almost no margin for error. What I’d already set out to do would be hard enough. Moreover, I needed panels that would fit into a Silver Age-style six-panel grid—panels of wildly differing sizes would be impossible to jigsaw-puzzle together.

STEP FOUR: I had to look over all the existing pages and, while making detailed notes, get a sense of what kind of story might be told with the artwork at hand. There were a lot of pages of Cap simply fighting modern-day villains in the streets and buildings of New York City. Suppose Cap were racing across Manhattan, facing some sort of gantlet put before him by the Red Skull? If so, why? There were some panels I could use of scientists in a lab. Perhaps Cap was struggling to get something to them? How would the menaces he’d face connect to be part of a cohesive story?

STEP FIVE: All of this left me with roughly 150 pages of artwork from which I could choose panels. I’m pretty versatile in Photoshop and could have begun cutting and pasting on the computer—but at this stage, it was just easier and faster to stay old-school. I printed every page out with my inkjet printer, got out scissors, X-Acto knives, and a cutting mat and built a deck of panels to play with, moving them around constantly in search of building some continuity.

STEP SIX: A rough narrative began to take shape. Here’s a good sequence with Cap fighting the Super-Adaptoid, but I can’t imagine a way to put that villain in the middle of a story and not see him defeated; out it goes. Here’s a run of panels showing Cap fighting a soldier with a raygun back in World War II—is there anything specific in the artwork that locked it into the 1940s? No? Can those panels be incorporated and juggled?

STEP SEVEN: The selection of potential panels grows smaller. Repetitive action poses? Out. Random gunmen just appearing and then disappearing? Out. But I’m finally zooming in on around 50 panels that could tell a story about Cap racing across New York to get to an injured S.H.I.E.L.D. agent in a lab. Hey, look! Here’s the only usable panel that might show such an agent. It’s from much later in the Captain America run, meaning the linework was a little bolder but not uncomfortably so, that’ll fit nicely. Huh—I have a dozen Red Skull panels here—which two or three would make him a presence in the story without having to have him confront Cap directly?

STEP EIGHT: The rough-draft paste-up was done with scissors and tape to arrange the panels into a Silver Age-style grid. I scanned the pages for the Marvel production offices to use as a guide, providing them also with identification as to where each and every panel came from, specifically.

STEP NINE: Production’s ten dialogue-and-caption-free pages come back for dialoguing, and I finally get to work with The King.

Overall, the project took about three days—one to go over the material, one to think up a story, and one to do the actual physical production. It was much more difficult to do than I’d dreamed—but with the right artist (Steve Ditko? Jim Aparo?), it might be fun to take another swing at it down the road.

Read the full story in CAPTAIN AMERICA #700, by Mark Waid and Chris Samnee—out today!

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Ant-Man and the Wasp #1 coming soon too!

On June 20, Tony Stark returns.

He’s back, at last, having been the subject of a long and troubled search throughout the pages of INVINCIBLE IRON MAN. And, as Nerdist announced today, writer Dan Slott and artist Valerio Schiti will join forces to tell a entirely different kind of story in TONY STARK: IRON MAN.

From the cusp of tomorrow’s dreams to the forefront of imagination, one man always soars on the cutting edge of adventure.

You know his name. Tony Stark is Iron Man. And Iron Man…is an idea. Always changing. Always evolving. An idea without limit!

Prepare to witness the ultimate Self-Made Hero’s journey to new heights of inventiveness! Tony Stark is Iron Man. And the future is now.

Tony Stark: Iron Man #1 Cover by Alexander Lozano

After getting a dose of the high-flying action alongside Tony Stark, shrink down to a different kind of hero story in ANT-MAN AND THE WASP! Written by Mark Waid with art by Marvel Young Gun Javier Garrón, this five-issue limited series sees Scott Lang unite with Nadia Pym!

Wasp was just trying to help Ant-Man get home to Earth to see his daughter…but a little problem got in the way. Very little. Subatomic, in fact, as Lang was lost in the vast spaces between atoms! Now, Nadia is his only hope of rescue…if only he would listen long enough for her to save them! Get ready for a big journey getting smaller all the time in ANT-MAN AND THE WASP!

Ant-Man and the Wasp #1 Cover by David Nakayama

On June 20, read TONY STARK: IRON MAN #1 by Dan Slott and Valerio Schiti! Then jump aboard Mark Waid and Javier Garrón’s ANT-MAN & THE WASP #1!

Read more, and stay up-to-date with all the exciting announcements coming from Marvel Comics, right here!

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Mark Waid and Jesus Saiz send the Sorcerer Supreme to space!

This June, writer Mark Waid and artist Jesus Saiz are set for a journey across the universe in DOCTOR STRANGE #1!

The Eye of Agamotto is closed! Doctor Stephen Strange has lost his connection to the Earth’s arcane power, and he can’t wait to recover while nightmares press against the seams of our reality. Tony Stark offers a 21st-century solution: when astral travel fails, try astronautical travel. Enter Doctor Strange: Space-Explorer Supreme!

Different spells, allies, and enemies—new and old—await Strange beyond the stars, along with corners and secrets of the Marvel Universe, seen here for the first time! Space is endless, but time is short. After years of threats, Stephen’s bill for magic-use is coming due—who will come to collect?!

“I’ve been a Strange fan forever, but I’ve never been lucky enough to write an extended run featuring the good doctor. Along with editor Nick Lowe, we’ve come up with some new and very unexpected places to take Stephen Strange in the Marvel Universe—starting with the stars. When Strange’s magic suddenly exhausts itself, he’ll have to travel off-earth to recharge his batteries,” teases Waid, “Let’s hope he survives the trip.”

And Jesus Saiz shares a similar excitement for the extraordinary adventures to come: “Working on this book is an absolute delight. I’ve always enjoyed depicting bizarre characters in fantastic settings much more than portraying the real world, and in that sense this comic really delivers! I don’t like to use photographic references, as you need to do when you are drawing a particular car, weapon, or specific New York street. I prefer to draw with inspiration directly from my head, and Doctor Strange is the perfect book for that!”

Doctor Strange #1 Cover by Jesus Saiz

The artist continues, “If I have to think about the biggest challenge while working on this book, it’d probably be giving all the different aliens and worlds a distinctive, interesting look. For inspiration, I try to have my eyes very open, because you never know where the could come from. It could be a fashion photo, an undersea creature, or a Bosch painting…everything can give you a silhouette, or a color scheme, or something to start working with. I only try to avoid actual science-fiction images because I want this book to look as fresh as possible.”

“And you know, Mark is simply fantastic,” says Saiz, “I love how, even when he writes the most crazy, outrageous, fantastic scenes, he never loses touch with the characters or the story he is telling. And he really gives you the most wonderful stuff to draw! We’re only getting started with this, and I believe we are both really trying to create a story that nobody will ever forget. We’re taking Doctor Strange from his lowest and giving him a new life, new goals. He’ll have to learn everything again to emerge a better man, a new leader. If he survives this ordeal, that is!”

Read DOCTOR STRANGE #1, by Mark Waid and Jesus Saiz, on June 6! And stay up-to-date with all the exciting announcements coming from Marvel Comics right here!

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Multiple Man and Cosmic Ghost Rider join the lineup!

This June, horror has a name.

You’d never notice the man. He doesn’t like to be noticed.

He’s quiet. Calm. Never complains.

Why, you can walk up and shoot him in the head…And all he’ll do is die.

Until night falls. And someone else gets up again.

The name is Banner.

The horror is THE IMMORTAL HULK.

Immortal Hulk #1 Cover by Alex Ross

Written by Al Ewing with art by Joe Bennett, IMMORTAL HULK sends the Jade Giant back to his monstrous origins. Witness the return of Bruce Banner’s alter-ego in IMMORTAL HULK #1 on June 6! And stay up-to-date with all the exciting #1 news at marvel.com/marvel2018comics!

Joining the green guy in Marvel announcements this week is writer Matthew Rosenberg and artist Andy MacDonald’s MULTIPLE MAN! The five issue limited series tells a mind-twisting tale in the latest chapter of Jamie Madrox’s many lives.

And the final puzzle piece in this round-up of Marvel news is the arrival of COSMIC GHOST RIDER! The breakout star of THANOS, the Rider will continue his tour of the universe this summer, penned by Donny Cates!

Ewing! Bennett! Rosenberg! MacDonald! Cates! Make Mine Marvel this summer!

The announcements don’t end here…Stay tuned to Marvel.com for more reveals in the coming days and weeks!

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Mark Waid starts the search for a new Champion!

Fresh off the events of the “Words Collide” story arc, the Champions sit reeling after the heartbreaking loss of a team member. But the group’s decided to honor the memory of their fallen comrade by making sure to stay strong for the sake of the world they swore to protect.

To keep their foothold in the fight for good, they’ll need some help…and in CHAMPIONS #16, the search for a new teammate begins. On January 17, writer Mark Waid and artist Humberto Ramos put a few hopefuls to the test in part one of “Champion for a Day”!

We spoke with Waid to hear more about what to expect.

Marvel.com: Catch us up on what went down in the “Worlds Collide” arc!

Mark Waid: The Avengers and the Champions teamed up for a mission to save two worlds and, after some trials and tribulation, they succeeded. But the victory came at a terrible cost: Viv Vision disappeared before their eyes, believed dead.

Marvel.com: So how do the Champs pick up the pieces in issue #16?

Mark Waid: No one on the team is quite sure what’s up and what’s down all of a sudden. Feels kick in hard, but so does the realization that the team needs more power if they’re going to survive.

Marvel.com: What qualities will the team be looking for in potential recruits?

Mark Waid: Heroes close to their age, really? They’re not terribly choosy beyond that, though they really ought to be…

Marvel.com: Who’s lining up for auditions?

Mark Waid: Among others—the new Patriot, Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, Red Locust, Ironheart, and a few surprises!

Marvel.com: How did you enjoy writing the candidates’ interactions with the Champions?

Mark Waid: Ironheart and Cho-Hulk have a very unique way of communicating with one another that’s ended up being the most fun I’ve had writing in quite a while.

Marvel.com: What proved to be the most difficult part about bringing this story together after such an intense arc?

Mark Waid: It’s always been a tough balancing act to juggle drama and comedy in this book, but with an art team like the one I’m blessed with? They pull it off beautifully.

Marvel.com: Favorite moment to write in issue #16?

Mark Waid: Miles Morales explaining who he wants on the team.

Marvel.com: Last question: What would the Champions say if you showed up to a recruiting drive?

Mark Waid: “You’re about 40 years too late…but here’s a consolation flight belt.”

Assess the new recruits in CHAMPIONS #16, by Mark Waid and artist Humberto Ramos, on January 17!

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Mark Waid sends Steve Rogers a Kraven foe!

It’s been difficult for Steve Rogers to make himself at home in America in the aftermath of Secret Empire; even though he dealt with his evil Hydra counterpart and saved the day in heroic fashion, he still has some convincing to do.

And in part three of the “Home of the Brave” storyline, Steve’s journey across the United States continues—though his road trip hits another hurdle as Kraven the Hunter puts the red, white, and blue between his cross-hairs. On January 3, writer Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee look to ensnare the Sentinel of Liberty in CAPTAIN AMERICA #697!

We spoke with Waid about Rogers’ trials in the heart of America.

Marvel.com: What’s been going on in the “Home of the Brave” arc so far?

Mark Waid: Cap’s been roaming the country looking to reconnect with people. Unfortunately, Kraven’s taking him on a wild detour!

Marvel.com: How has Cap been managing to reclaim his good reputation?

Mark Waid: It’s not the easiest road for him, but given that our story takes place many months after Secret Empire, most people are glad to see Steve Rogers…most people. Not everyone.

Marvel.com: Describe the dynamic you see between Cap and Kraven.

Mark Waid: As you can imagine, Cap has nothing but disdain for someone like Kraven who pretends to have a sense of honor and yet demonstrates anything but. Kraven wants to make Cap his prey, but, as Cap points out, to be prey you have to be afraid of the hunter.

Marvel.com: What ended up being the most challenging element of writing this issue?

Mark Waid: Doing heavy research into genuine jungle traps that real commandos use!

Marvel.com: What proved to be your favorite part to write?

Mark Waid: The opening scene with Steve Rogers at a pool table—it’s a bit I’ve been wanting to use for 20 years.

The hunt begins in CAPTAIN AMERICA #697, by Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee, on January 3!

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A brand new Swordsman aims to make Cap’s life miserable

Captain America just wants to travel across America and right the small injustices that he has often missed. A simple wish, a noble one. And one the brand new Swordsman has no intention of letting Cap achieve without a fight.

Mark Waid took a moment from learning blacksmithing to tell us about the new villain, give credit to his collaborator Chris Samnee, and continue to promote the rehabilitation of Steve Rogers.

Marvel.com: To start from a broad perspective, as a writer what about creating a new Swordsman appealed to you? What kind of challenges did the character present in terms of being revamped and reintroduced?

Mark Waid: To be honest, it was Chris Samnee’s suggestion. The challenge was to introduce and motivate him quickly to make room for a dynamic sword vs. shield battle!

Marvel.com: As much as you can, without spoiling things, what does this new Swordsman have in common and how does he differ from his predecessors who used that name?

Mark Waid: He looks very much the same—I wouldn’t be surprised if there were some relation to the original Swordsman—but this one’s different in that he’s basically an extortionist. That, and he may or may not be being played by someone else.

Marvel.com: As an antagonist, how does he fit in with the overall theme of this opening arc of Steve reconnecting with himself and rediscovering Captain America?

Mark Waid: Cap has to fight Swordsman to save an entire small town from destruction. As is the ongoing theme of this book, this is about Steve Rogers connecting with and saving ordinary people in the heartland, the kinds of people he doesn’t often encounter in New York or Washington.

Marvel.com: Given your history, it is clear you and Chris Samnee make an excellent team. On creating the new Swordsman, how did that collaboration work? How much did Chris help you determine things like the character’s personality, motives, and such, and how did you help him to craft the character’s look?

Mark Waid: Straight up, this is 90% Chris. I’m terrible at design, so I always leave that to my collaborators—but giving the Swordsman a unique voice was my challenge to face.

Marvel.com: To stay with art for a moment, Matthew Wilson’s coloring, in collaboration with Chris’s art, favors something sunnier and more open than with previous team ups for Daredevil and Black Widow. How does that help you to realize the themes of the arc? How does it inspire your conception of the action, set pieces, and so on of each issue?

Mark Waid: Cap doesn’t live in a dark, foreboding world–or if he runs across it, he provides a light. That’s it in a nutshell.

Marvel.com: What makes this issue a great point to jump on to the book?

Mark Waid: It’s a clean done-in-one story that hits home the ideals for which Captain America stands and what his physical limits are. If you like Steve Rogers on the screen, you’ll love him on the printed page.

Read CAPTAIN AMERICA #695, by Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee, now, and don’t miss part 2 with CAPTAIN AMERICA #696 on December 6!

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Mark Waid sets two teams—and two Earths—up for annihilation!

Earth and Counter-Earth have been set on a crash course by The High Evolutionary. In response, the Avengers and the Champions must put aside their differences and work together to save the world(s)!

On December 6, find out what happens when worlds collide in writer Mark Waid and artist Jesus Saiz’s AVENGERS #674!

We dropped a line on Waid to hear a little more about the fate of the teams.

Marvel.com: Give us a brief recap of where the teams find themselves in this crossover!

Mark Waid: Things are not looking good for either team, especially now that we’ve taken a major player off the board—and turned Viv from synthezoid to full human!

Marvel.com: Which two team members have you enjoyed pairing up the most?

Mark Waid: I very much enjoyed putting Amadeus and Hercules back together as old friends. They play well off of one another.

Marvel.com: What does each team teach the other in this storyline?

Mark Waid: The Champions remind the Avengers that experience isn’t everything. The Avengers remind the Champions that sometimes the stakes are so high that there’s no time to be amazed—just to act.

Marvel.com: How have the group dynamics changed after so much has gone down?

Mark Waid: There’s still tension. It’s not “punch each other in the face” tension—these are adults and smart teenagers, people—but the Avengers do tend to do too much Avengersplaining.

Marvel.com: If you could be on one of the two teams, which would you pick?

Mark Waid: Easy. The Champions. Cyclops is one of my favorite Marvel heroes. We could hang.

Grab AVENGERS #674, by Mark Waid and artist Jesus Saiz, on December 6!

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Mark Waid introduces Cap to Marvel Legacy!

On November 1, a new era begins for the Sentinel of Liberty with CAPTAIN AMERICA #695!

Marvel Legacy rises as writer Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee reunite in an attempt to restore Steve Rogers’ reputation—though it won’t be an easy task, as they’ve got to shine a shield tarnished by the events of Secret Empire. Back in the action wearing the famous red-white-and-blue, Captain America faces one of his toughest journeys yet—reconstructing his legacy.

How will he tackle the challenge? We caught up with Mark Waid to find out.

Marvel.com: What made CAPTAIN AMERICA the best fit for you—and for a reunited Waid-Samnee team—at this moment in time?

Mark Waid: It’s the best fit for me not only because I love Steve Rogers, but also because I’m smart enough to hang onto Chris Samnee’s coattails whenever possible. We make a good team, and it’s terrific to finally see Chris cut loose on a top-tier Marvel hero.

Marvel.com: How daunting of a task will it be to tell Cap’s story in the wake of Secret Empire? What do you see as the biggest challenge of such an undertaking?

Mark Waid: The biggest challenge will be, of course, restoring his reputation post-Secret Empire—but rather than be too bound to a timeline, our fans have made it clear that they want classic Cap, so we’ll be looking forward more than in the rear-view mirror.

Beyond that, it’s important to Team Cap that we make one thing abundantly clear: while we’re having a blast and giving you a very classic Steve Rogers, Chris and I have been working on these first few issues since March—way in advance of the more volatile political events of the summer. Because of our lead time, he won’t get around to punching Nazis on page one. But it’s coming.

Marvel.com: What does Steve currently see as his biggest hurdle to restoring his rep?

Mark Waid: To “find America,” as it were; to reconnect with a heartland he’s never really spent much time in. Steve claims to represent America and yet spends almost all his time in New York. He wants to change that.

Marvel.com: Do Americans still support him? Do they resent him?

Mark Waid: We’ve built at least a six-month delay from the end of Secret Empire into our first issue, so while there will be dark and shady looks glared his way—and there will be those who don’t trust him—not every issue finds Cap pleading for understanding. In fact, our first issue kind of overcompensates. You’ll see what we mean.

Marvel.com: What about the bad guys? How do they feel about Cap now?

Mark Waid: They feel that maybe they have a better shot at him, not only because he has no Avengers back-up, but because he’s still a little off his pins after Secret Empire.

Marvel.com: What do you foresee as the upcoming adversity for Cap? New threats? Classic threats refreshed? A combination?

Mark Waid: All the above. Kraven couldn’t have been a more perfect call—they’ve never duked it out—and wait until you see the weird, Kirby-by-way-of-Samnee villain showing up in issue #698…

Marvel.com: Can’t wait! One final question to wrap this up: when you first saw a piece of Chris’s artwork for this book, what went through your mind?

Mark Waid: That I should never complain about anything in life ever again.

Start a new chapter with CAPTAIN AMERICA #695, by Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee, on November 1!

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