The on-the-run Wallcrawler joins Marvel Legacy!

On November 15, Spider-Man finds himself on the wrong side of the law once again…as the Web-Head joins the Marvel Legacy era in PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN #297!

Writer Chip Zdarsky and artist Adam Kubert get the blame for Spidey’s latest woes—they instigated the emergence of his “sister” Teresa, his run-in with Kingpin and The Tinkerer, and his failing attempts to maintain a normal life. And now Parker has to deal with the NYPD heading up a spider-hunt for the so-called “A-Wreck-Nid.”

Looks like Peter will need more than a few cool gadgets and a quick Thwip-quip to keep his web from unraveling this time…

United States District Court – Warrant of Arrest

Case: The State of New York vs. Spider-Man
Date: Nov. 15, 2017
Case Number: 297 

Defendant: Spider-Man
Known affiliates: Teresa Durand, The Human Torch, Chip Zdarsky, Adam Kubert

Description: Suspect stands at approximately 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighs 160 pounds. Age unknown—though his attempts at humor, which might suggest a boy in his teens, likely put him in his mid to late 20s.

Known to swing from trees, streetlights, and other city dwellings wearing a red and blue spider-suit. Officers should keep their ears tuned in for the distinguishing “Thwip” sound created by his web shooters. Gunshots, explosions, and destruction of property act as a likely signal of his presence. Suspect has no problem leaving cops hanging; approach with caution.

Cause for arrest: This warrant has been issued in response to the widespread local terror and property damage caused by the well-known Wallcrawler. Damages to the city during his acts of “heroism” have been measured in millions of dollars.

This masked-mayhem has also been photographed cavorting with a known enemy of the state, Teresa Durand—believed to have stolen top-secret information from S.H.I.E.L.D.

Suspect faces charges of breaking and entering, as well as assault, pending against him by respected New York businessman Wilson Fisk. The mouthy menace also seems to be wanted for questioning by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. This section will remain open for the addition of inevitable future infractions.

Witness the action on November 15 in writer Chip Zdarsky and artist Adam Kubert’s PETER PARKER: SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN #297!

Read More

Writer Donny Cates conjures up mischief with our newest Sorcerer Supreme!

What would happen if Loki, the God of Mischief, became the Sorcerer Supreme? That’s exactly the question that writer Donny Cates tackles in the upcoming DOCTOR STRANGE #381. We may not know what Loki is up to yet, but we do know one thing – it won’t be boring! We caught up with Cates to find out more about what we can expect.

Marvel.com: Loki obviously doesn’t have the same altruistic leanings as Stephen Strange…as the Sorcerer Supreme, will he use his role to further his own ends?

Donny Cates: Hmmmm, yes and no. That question there is really the heart of Loki, right? He’s so much fun because you never know the rules of whatever game he’s currently playing. So yes, he probably is using his role to serve his own needs….but what if his needs are altruistic? Is he still being selfish and underhanded if the result is a net positive? I’m not saying that’s necessarily the case here, but I wouldn’t ever get too comfortable with how you perceive Loki and his intentions.

Marvel.com: Stephen has a lot of experience when it comes to sorcery, but Loki has been doing it even longer. How will that inform how he approaches being Sorcerer Supreme?

Donny Cates: Well, at the end of the day, this is still very much a book about Stephen Strange. So, it’s very interesting, because on the one hand you have this GOD who is now insanely powerful in his new role….and then we have Stephen. I can’t say much about where Stephen is in this arc, but it’s unusual, and more (ahem) low-key than anything we’ve ever seen before. So it’s a nice dichotomy between the two.

How’s that for dodging a question? 🙂

Doctor Strange #381 cover by Mike Del Mundo

Marvel.com: Loki is, of course, the god of mischief. He doesn’t have the same reverence for authority as some of the more “heroic” characters. It seems like he’d have a lot of fun in this role. He could definitely mess with people.

Donny Cates: Oh for sure! As is said in the first issue, Loki is not, nor has he ever been, overly fond of “the rules.” So he kind of bumps up against this idea of magic having limits and prices. He’s not into it. And that leads him, and us,  down some rather dark roads.  

Marvel.com: Still, Loki often chooses to do the right thing. He might not want to admit it, but he does care. So can we expect to see him using his authority for the greater good, as well?

Donny Cates: Yeah, that’s what’s so amazing about him as a character these days. Even when he WANTS to do something good, no one on Earth (or in any realm) believes him. Everyone still thinks of him as this mustache-twirling villain, but that’s not really who he is anymore, right? He’s much more complicated.

I should mention though, that whatever supposed heroic deeds Loki has planned, or how well his intentions are….the good Doctor will be having none of it. Stephen doesn’t trust Loki as far as he can throw him, and he will stop at nothing to see his home, his cloak, and his title returned to him.

The lengths Strange will go through to see his livelihood returned to him…that’s the real story here. And I promise you can’t fathom what those lengths will be.

You’ve never seen Doctor Strange like this.

Doctor Strange #382 cover by Mike Del Mundo

Marvel.com: Would you like to mention or tease anything else?

Donny Cates: If I were a betting man….I’d pay A LOT OF ATTENTION to the second issue of my run. DOCTOR STRANGE #382 is a big one folks. I’ll see you there!

DOCTOR STRANGE #381, by Donny Cates and Gabriel Hernandez Walta, hits shelves on November 15!

Read More

Learn about the special features surrounding the new Marvel initiative!

Sometimes when you’re moving forward, it helps to take a look back at where you’ve been. With Marvel, it’s easy when you stand on a rich foundation stone of history, characters, and creators.

The Marvel Legacy event includes not only launches of all-new storylines, but also an infusion of retro atmosphere in the form of Marvel Value Stamps, a new issue of the classic FOOM magazine, and in-house ads flowing with the frenetic feeling of the 1960s and 1970s. To celebrate, we checked in with some of the Marvelites who made it all happen: David Gabriel, Senior Vice President of Sales & Marketing; Tom Brevoort, Senior Vice President of Publishing; and artist Mike McKone.

Marvel.com: David, you’re up first—as all these retro projects were being worked on, what was the feeling around the offices? Excitement to be doing something fun like these? Nostalgia?

David Gabriel: There was definitely the feeling that we wanted to craft a fun promotional program around the whole idea of Marvel Legacy. From the initial call out to “Make Mine Marvel,” it seemed a perfect fit to reach back into some of the nostalgic items that helped propel Marvel to the forefront of the comics industry as far back as the 60s and recreate some of those things for a modern day. We knew there would be some fans who remembered some of these items fondly and some who would be discovering them for the first time. But the key behind everything we did was to use the past to entice all readers in the present!

Marvel.com: Tom, what about you?

Tom Brevoort: They’re certainly fun, and tap into that Marvel spirit that Stan [Lee] first established, that sense of fun and excitement and also self-effacement. But it couldn’t just be nostalgia, if for no other reason than many of the elements that we’re mimicking are long-ago enough that the readership has cycled through many times since then—so a modern day fan might have no knowledge of them. So each one had to work and be a fun piece on its own in the here and now as well.

Marvel.com: What was the general decision-making process like, as far as which things to hit for the event?

David Gabriel: We chose many of the things we all had fond memories of. The Marvel Value Stamps were pretty much on everyone’s list, at least everyone who was collecting comics in the 1970s. FOOM was a close second. That was a little less known to a wider audience. But there is a huge fondness for one of the first fandom mags that Marvel put out on a regular basis. The idea for the retro house ads just made sense as well. We all felt we’ve seen our current format for house ads for a while and they needed a boost. Many of us fondly remembered how exciting it was—before Internet—to see what was coming up in Marvel titles through the dynamic, often over the top, house ads that appeared throughout their books. So one of our designers was challenged to update them and she did a terrific job. I think the trade dress with corner boxes had already been bubbling under the surface as the X-office started this a few months earlier, and that received great praise, so we knew the trade dress having a nod to the past would definitely be a must.

Tom Brevoort: We tried to hone in on things that would play for an audience today, but that would have an additional layer of meaning to a long-time reader.

Marvel.com: Tom, for the Value Stamps, what did they mean to you personally? Did you cut yours out of the comics?

Tom Brevoort: I never did, but I certainly wound up buying many, many comics from people who did. They’re the bane of collectors of the comics of that period—something like one in every five copies have the damn stamps cut out from them, and there’s no way to tell from the outside. There’s that horrifying moment when you get your book home and crack open the plastic bag, flip through it and—AAUUGGHH!

David Gabriel: [Laughs] Yes. I think many folks have that story. I have a beautiful copy of INCREDIBLE HULK #181 with a nice square cut out of the last page, ruining the story! Those original stamps were randomly placed in Marvel comics and in order to get the entire set of 100 you really had to search far and wide without any knowledge of what books those stamps would appear in. But, that was the only way to collect them all! While they added no value to the book, they did simply add an extra element of fun. Enough so that many comic fans still remember them nearly 50 years later.

Marvel.com: Okay, for the new Stamps, why was Mike McKone the artist to handle these?

David Gabriel: Talent Management suggested Mike, and we love his work, so it was a great fit. Mike was turning these in four at a time at a terrific rate and with each one that came through, everyone was in love with them. So once we used them to promote the start of Marvel Legacy, we realized we had great images to use for corner boxes, variant covers, pins, and even the new Marvel Value Stamps. It’s really not that different from the 1970s where you would see the same likeness of heroes and villains used for a variety of different things throughout Marvel comics, ads, posters, standees, figurines, corner boxes, stickers and more. Mike did a terrific job!

Marvel.com: How were the characters chosen? And will the Value Stamps have any trade-in value going forward?

Tom Brevoort: The modern-day Value Stamps pretty well align to the books in Marvel Legacy. That was our checklist, so to speak.

David Gabriel: There is talk now of crafting a Marvel Insider program for the Value Stamps which would indeed reward those fans who collected them all. It’s a good time to mention that we are creating a free Marvel Value Stamp collectors album that we’re giving retailers as a promotional item for November. This will be a simple foldout to make collecting the stamps easier. We’ll announce how these would be redeemed soon.

We also worked out a cool digital component to the Marvel Value Stamp program. Every time you download the digital code from a print comic, you can also download a digital Marvel 1970s Remastered Value Stamp, and collect them all in a special digital collectors album. You just need to download the Quidd App, and you can get started.

Marvel.com: Mike, let’s bring you in at this point—what did you think when the project was offered to you?

Mike McKone: I was offered the project by George Beliard at Marvel. I think initially it was for 20 headshots and I didn’t know what they were going to be used for. I grew up reading Marvel books that had the headshots in the top corner box of the covers so I thought it was a great idea to revisit that type of imagery.

Marvel.com: How long did each piece take you to illustrate on average?

Mike McKone: Not too long. Maybe a couple of hours for a simple one, and four hours for a more complex one such as Medusa.

Marvel.com: Were there characters that didn;t make the cut that you would have liked to have done?

Mike McKone: I would have happily and contentedly drawn every Marvel character, but I do wish Colossus and Nightcrawler could have been included.

Marvel.com: What is your favorite of the images of the ones you did?

Mike McKone: Fin Fang Foom! One of the [most fun] characters and trickiest to draw, at least for me.

Marvel.com: Back to David and Tom now for the rest of the Marvel Legacy cool stuff—what was the tone you were going for with the retro ads?

David Gabriel: The tone was definitely meant to bring back some of that nostalgic over-the-top marketing text that is so associated with things that Stan Lee and others from Marvel’s past would use when promoting the books. Most of the text was written by Jason Pearl who works in the Sales and Marketing group, but of course, it was all run by editorial and got a few tweaks here and there. What we ended up with are some of the most notable house ads that have been put forth in years. It’s odd that we’re even discussing them here, but others have brought these up, and I think it’s a testament to the strength of the nostalgia for Marvel that we’ve tapped in to.

Tom Brevoort: I love the retro ads. To me, they’re so much more engaging and provocative than many of the ads we’ve done in recent years. So while they’re deliberately mimicking the style of the ads of a particular era, I hope we keep them around, or adopt some of that style moving forward. They really do make me want to check out the different titles we have coming out.

Marvel.com: David, you said FOOM was very high on the bucket list; what was the attraction for you to produce a new issue?

David Gabriel: FOOM was a great way to start creating a fan club for Marvel in the 70s. It was a magazine that gave you all the insights into what was going on at Marvel at the time. You could subscribe to it and get it sent directly to you. Seemed like a fun idea to bring that back to the current day and keep the tone and the stories close to what they used to be. The crew of writers working with us and the Trades department did a terrific job of the material and the design and format. They hired a group of writers to interview folks, research stories, and craft a fantastic magazine. I’ve heard retailers and fans say “when is the next issue?” which is always a great sign.

Marvel.com: How was it decided what kinds of articles it would have?

David Gabriel: In coming up with the stories, it was a little of everything. We looked at the original stories and tried to recapture some of that flavor to give folks an inside look or an historical look at the workings of our publishing group. We naturally wanted a feature about Marvel Legacy and some of the other upcoming major titles coming up like AVENGERS: NO SURRENDER and MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE. We also talked to folks in editorial, and we were all saddened but proud to be able to pay tribute to a beloved co-worker, the one and only Flo Steinberg! I think there’s something for everyone in here. Best part too was that we were able to send these to retailers free for their customers.

To keep up on all things Marvel Legacy, be sure to visit our official hub page!

Read More

Mariko Tamaki fills us in on what Legacy has in store for Jen Walters!

The Leader is back on the scene to wreak havoc (it’s kind of his thing), but this time the big-headed ne’er-do-well strikes our hero when She-Hulk is at her weakest. Dealing with her new grey state has been challenging enough for Jen to face as it is, but what will happen when she is forced to face herself… literally?

SHE-HULK #159 by writer Mariko Tamaki with art by Jahnoy Lindsay presents their Legacy offering — JEN WALTERS MUST DIE: PART 1! Catch it on November 8th at a comic store near you.

We grill Mariko Tamaki on SHE-HULK Legacy and her strongest foe yet: herself.

Marvel.com: How has Jen Walters been holding up lately? Walk us through her state of mind, personally and professionally.

Mariko Tamaki: Professionally, Jen is good. Great, even! Work is busy because she’s got a full case load. Personally? Yeah, she’s burying everything under that workload. She’s still in a place where she’s not the Jen/Hulk she wants to be, but she’s determined to power through because she thinks it will be possible to deal with all the things she’s dealing with BY powering through… she is, of course, not entirely correct.

SHE-HULK #159

Marvel.com: Jen does so much to help save other people, but why is it so much harder for her to save herself (from herself)?

Mariko Tamaki: I think dealing with your own stuff is a whole other skill set. It’s like knowing how to explain how to play baseball and knowing how to play baseball. It’s a whole extra bit of uncomfortable work! And delving into that pain and discomfort is something Jen is afraid will undo her, so she’s mostly avoiding it. Helping people feels good, so she’s focusing on that.

Marvel.com: What has it been like working with a new series artist (the wonderful Jahnoy Lindsay)?

Mariko Tamaki: I have been incredibly lucky to work with so many amazing artists on this series. I love working with Jahnoy!

Marvel.com: Jen recently opted back to the title “She-Hulk.” Is she a little torn on whether it’s right to take on Bruce’s title of “Hulk” in light of his tragic passing

Mariko Tamaki: I don’t think Jen is concerned with being called Hulk or She-Hulk. Jen is very busy and also, most importantly, Jen knows who she is. She is Hulk and she is She-Hulk!

Marvel.com: What does the Marvel Legacy mean to you personally as a reader of and a writer for the brand?

Mariko Tamaki: To me it means going big, bringing something somewhat colossal to the story. The Leader is the perfect person to bring in now. He’s so striking and evil.  I love writing him. With the Leader, we wanted to go big with the villain in this issue, to connect a novel foe with Jen’s current mental state.

Marvel.com: How does Jen feel about her grey form? What does she like and dislike about that new development?

Mariko Tamaki: Being grey Hulk is still sort of out-of-body for Jen, literally. It’s a powerful but still unfamiliar feeling. Also it’s connected to trauma, to being in pain, and that’s not an easy thing. It’s not a form she completely trusts, at this point, and for good reason… as we shall see.

Charge over to a comic store near you on November 8th for SHE-HULK #159 by Mariko Tamaki and Jahnoy Lindsay, everywhere Marvel comics are sold!

Read More

Artist Jahnoy Lindsay flexes his artistic muscles for Marvel Legacy!

Jen Walters Must Die!

…will be the name of this story’s first arc! On November 8, the sensational attorney-turned-super hero enters Marvel Legacy with SHE-HULK #159!

Writer Mariko Tamaki and artist Jahnoy Lindsay present Jen with a new enemy: The Leader. And our hero will do her best to fend him—and that title reference—off as a new era begins for She-Hulk.

We sat down with Jahnoy to hear about Jen’s new look, the Leader’s role, and working with Tamaki.

Marvel.com: Jen’s been through a lot in the past few years. How has all that changed her from a physical perspective?

Jahnoy Lindsay: I think she’s gotten much tougher, which seems kind of weird to think of because she’s always been such a strong character.

Marvel.com: We get a new version of She-Hulk in this book. How has it been getting used to this new style?

Jahnoy Lindsay: Admittedly, it has been a bit challenging, but definitely a ton of fun. I really want to convey just how monstrous and powerful this new She-Hulk can be.

Marvel.com: The Leader’s always been an interesting foil to whatever Hulk he faces—he’s the perfect physical counterpoint to raw power.

Jahnoy Lindsay: Absolutely—it’s the classic battle of brains vs. brawn.

Marvel.com: Mariko’s been steering the SHE-HULK ship for about a year now. How has it been working with her?

Jahnoy Lindsay: It’s been great! Her scripts are easy for me to follow and not too restricting, so I’m able to have fun and do my thing. I feel very blessed to be working with her—and my Editor, Christina Harrington—my first time around.

SHE-HULK #159, by writer Mariko Tamaki and artist Jahnoy Lindsay, drops on November 8!

Read More

Warlock returns in Guardians of the Galaxy #150!

Coming up inside GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #150, Adam Warlock makes his return to the Marvel Universe in a Marvel Legacy special event as the search for the Infinity Stones continues! Written by Gerry Duggan with art by Marcus To, Gamora and company seek the Soul Stone—but what will the reappearance of their once ally and former holder of said bauble mean for their quest?

First introduced in the 1967 pages of FANTASTIC FOUR #66, Warlock evolved over the years to become a cosmic warrior and key figure in the saga of the Infinity Stones. A mercurial figure, and a one-time Guardian himself, Adam could tip the scales in favor—or against—the current squad.

Why has Warlock come back? And from where? The mystery remains. Does he seek the Infinity Stones for himself? Find out in “The Return of Adam Warlock, Part 1”!

Stay tuned to Marvel.com/nycc2017 for more news from New York Comic Con! And check out our social channels all weekend with #MarvelNYCC.

Read More

Christina Strain unites the original team with the current mutant squad!

The original team returns in GENERATION X #85—and they’ve come together to help one of their own!

On December 20, writer Christina Strain and artist Amilcar Pinna cross mutant generations as Marvel Legacy begins! Jubilee’s students at The Xavier Institute for Higher Learning will meet their predecessors as she, Chamber, and Husk look to assist a former teammate, Monet.

Can they save her? What role with Jubilee’s students play? We met up with Christina Strain to find out.

Marvel.com: How has writing GENERATION X been? List a few of your favorite moments so far.  

Christina Strain: It’s been stressful—but good. It’s crazy juggling writing a monthly book while also writing for TV and being a new mom…but, hey! It’s almost October, which means I’ve almost survived the year!

But through it all, there have been some really rewarding moments. Roxy’s struggles feel near and dear to my heart—and probably most encapsulate what we want to say with this book. The relationship between Quentin, Benjamin, and Nathaniel also represents something I’ve had mapped out from the beginning, so watching that unfold on the page has been so satisfying. And because Trevor and Lin are so much fun, they made writing issue #5 some of the most fun I’ve ever had doing this job.

Then with Jubilee…look, as an Asian kid, she meant a lot to me as one of the few visible—and awesome—Asian X-Men characters. And now that I’m an adult, with an adopted child, juggling a lot of responsibilities, it’s crazy, because I still identify with her—just on a totally different level. So getting to write her right now in particular has been incredible for me.

Marvel.com: What’s it like working with Amilcar Pinna on the title? 

Christina Strain: A dream! He’s so sweet and so good and he works so hard. His enthusiasm feels totally infectious and every time he turns in new pages, he gives me life.

I’ve been killing myself with work this year, and every time I feel like I’ve about died, Amilcar turns in pages and I am resurrected. Like, it makes me legit annoyed that people haven’t seen the most recent issues he’s drawn yet. They look gorgeous!

Marvel.com: Who can we expect to see from the old team as part of this new storyline?

Christina Strain: I hate spoilers! So I’m going to say this: You can search for [artist] Terry Dodson’s Legacy covers and that’ll tell you for sure who’s showing up—but something to keep in mind is that he drew it forever ago, before I finished outlining this arc…and I won’t say any more than that.

Marvel.com: I can’t imagine the new kids will just sit back while Jubilee and her friends go to work. What will their role be in the story?

Christina Strain: No, they won’t. As excited as I am to get into it with the OG crew, this book still feels primarily about Jubilee, Quentin, Roxy, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Trevor, and Lin—and what goes on with them, so they’ll still be front and center. The arc really focuses more on continuing the story we set out to tell while simultaneously using the OG character’s arcs as a foil.

Marvel.com: What old and new Generation X pairings have you enjoyed most?

Christina Strain: The interactions between Roxy and the group of Chamber, Husk, and Jubilee have probably been my favorite scenes to write. Because, for me, Roxy’s had the most complicated arc of all the characters and it really touches on several of the OG character’s own arcs. So there’s a lot to mine there. There’s also an interaction between Jubilee and Quentin in issue #85 that I’ve really loved writing and I’ll be curious to see how people react to that.

Read Christina Strain and artist Amilcar Pinna’s GENERATION X #85 on December 20!

Read More

Mark Waid introduces Cap to Marvel Legacy!

On November 1, a new era begins for the Sentinel of Liberty with CAPTAIN AMERICA #695!

Marvel Legacy rises as writer Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee reunite in an attempt to restore Steve Rogers’ reputation—though it won’t be an easy task, as they’ve got to shine a shield tarnished by the events of Secret Empire. Back in the action wearing the famous red-white-and-blue, Captain America faces one of his toughest journeys yet—reconstructing his legacy.

How will he tackle the challenge? We caught up with Mark Waid to find out.

Marvel.com: What made CAPTAIN AMERICA the best fit for you—and for a reunited Waid-Samnee team—at this moment in time?

Mark Waid: It’s the best fit for me not only because I love Steve Rogers, but also because I’m smart enough to hang onto Chris Samnee’s coattails whenever possible. We make a good team, and it’s terrific to finally see Chris cut loose on a top-tier Marvel hero.

Marvel.com: How daunting of a task will it be to tell Cap’s story in the wake of Secret Empire? What do you see as the biggest challenge of such an undertaking?

Mark Waid: The biggest challenge will be, of course, restoring his reputation post-Secret Empire—but rather than be too bound to a timeline, our fans have made it clear that they want classic Cap, so we’ll be looking forward more than in the rear-view mirror.

Beyond that, it’s important to Team Cap that we make one thing abundantly clear: while we’re having a blast and giving you a very classic Steve Rogers, Chris and I have been working on these first few issues since March—way in advance of the more volatile political events of the summer. Because of our lead time, he won’t get around to punching Nazis on page one. But it’s coming.

Marvel.com: What does Steve currently see as his biggest hurdle to restoring his rep?

Mark Waid: To “find America,” as it were; to reconnect with a heartland he’s never really spent much time in. Steve claims to represent America and yet spends almost all his time in New York. He wants to change that.

Marvel.com: Do Americans still support him? Do they resent him?

Mark Waid: We’ve built at least a six-month delay from the end of Secret Empire into our first issue, so while there will be dark and shady looks glared his way—and there will be those who don’t trust him—not every issue finds Cap pleading for understanding. In fact, our first issue kind of overcompensates. You’ll see what we mean.

Marvel.com: What about the bad guys? How do they feel about Cap now?

Mark Waid: They feel that maybe they have a better shot at him, not only because he has no Avengers back-up, but because he’s still a little off his pins after Secret Empire.

Marvel.com: What do you foresee as the upcoming adversity for Cap? New threats? Classic threats refreshed? A combination?

Mark Waid: All the above. Kraven couldn’t have been a more perfect call—they’ve never duked it out—and wait until you see the weird, Kirby-by-way-of-Samnee villain showing up in issue #698…

Marvel.com: Can’t wait! One final question to wrap this up: when you first saw a piece of Chris’s artwork for this book, what went through your mind?

Mark Waid: That I should never complain about anything in life ever again.

Start a new chapter with CAPTAIN AMERICA #695, by Mark Waid and artist Chris Samnee, on November 1!

Read More

What’s happened to The Daily Bugle?

After Parker Industries goes defunct, Peter Parker heads back to the illustrious halls of “The Daily Bugle.” On October 25, writer Dan Slott and artist Stuart Immonen bring Spidey down a few notches—and into Marvel Legacy—with AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #790!

Sometimes, when life pushes you down, you have to pick yourself up, start back at square one, and find a new path. Even if that means ending up back at your old high school job. Well, hope you at least got a pay raise, Spidey.

In response to this news, there will always be some unhappy people ready to voice their opinions…

Letter to the Editor

Just what, pray tell, has become of “The Daily Bugle”? I have not seen it so low since it literally got destroyed—the first or second time. Why, I remember when this great media outlet began back in 1897 (figuratively speaking) it really stood for something (literally and figuratively speaking); it provided an unbiased and accurate news outlet for the people.

When J. Jonah Jameson ran the place as Editor-in-Chief, to be sure, there were some hard times and he made some bad choices—like accidentally turning that private investigator into The Scorpion. And assuming you can forget the paper’s stint as the glorified tabloid, “The DB,” after JJJ briefly lost control of the paper to Dexter Bennett. But throughout his tenure, he maintained excellent daily news and fair coverage of the costumed crusaders known as “super heroes.”

Over the years, the paper has played host to its fair share of super powered scoundrels. I have it on good authority that Jeff Mace and Mary Morgan went off the deep end, becoming Patriot and Miss Patriot back in the 1940s. Followed more recently by the rude PI, Jessica Jones. But at least she doesn’t wear a mask—an air of transparency that we can all appreciate.

Thankfully, very few employees at the Bugle seemed to share as strong a bias toward these vigilantes as the young photographer, Peter Parker, who seemed to have a particular obsession with Spider-Man.

Now, as a seasoned reporter, Jameson never let this kind of staff favoritism alter his coverage of the webbed weirdo—or any other super hooligans for that matter. He alone gave us the real story of the New Avengers (a truly fine bunch—what with a wanted murderer and a few other unsavory types on the roster). And the paper’s strong endorsement of the Super Hero Registration Act mirrored the public demand to hold these heroes responsible for their actions.

Yet, since the mantel of Editor-in-Chief passed to a less committed man, Joe Robertson, I have been sorely disappointed to watch the paper’s tough stance on these masked criminals falter. And don’t let me even begin on that outrageous feature section “The Pulse”—clearly a ploy to gain readers with a clueless infatuation with these unnatural delinquents. I fear this will only worsen with the potential rehire of Parker.

I can only hope that, if “The Daily Bugle” remains determined to hire young persons like Peter Parker, they put them in less-pivotal roles where their personal biases might not besmirch the paper’s content. Here’s an idea: use them as in-house exterminators.

Be warned—if the paper continues to glorify these so-called “heroes,” I will be forced to end my longtime subscription and take my readership to “The Daily Globe.” Unless Parker and his silly band of Spider-fans somehow crawled their way into that establishment as well.

-Realistic Reader in New York, New York

Can Peter rise above the naysayers and take the Bugle, and his personal life, into a flourishing new era? Find out on October 25 with writer Dan Slott and artist Stuart Immonen’s AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #790!

Read More

Legacy dawns as Kate and Clint take Los Angeles with Kelly Thompson!

Some friends get together and pose for selfies. Kate Bishop and Clint Barton get together and pose for mugshots.

Or, at least, so it seems in writer Kelly Thompson and artist Leonardo Romero’s HAWKEYE #13! Clint makes his way to the West Coast to drop in on his protégé and friend…though he might be bringing quite an agenda along with him. Luckily, Kate wants something from her mentor as well.

We grabbed a green juice, got our tan on, and asked writer Thompson a few questions ahead of the Marvel Legacy title.

Marvel.com: The cover for issue #13 reveals that the Hawkeyes ride together again—what can you tell us about their reunion?

Kelly Thompson: Clint will actually show up at the tail end of HAWKEYE #12 in November and when we see him there, they both reach out to one another for the same reason—because they need help and trust the other, above all, to be there for them. It’s a great little moment that shows their bond. It then immediately devolves into comedy and bickering of course—but for a whole minute it’s beautiful!

Marvel.com: Having recently handled Clint and Kate’s team-up in GENERATIONS, how does their relationship in this comic differ to that? How does it remain the same?

Kelly Thompson: I definitely had to put some thought into GENERATIONS initially—into finding a voice for Clint that felt accurate to who he would be as a younger character but still felt true to the Clint we know today. That became somewhat tricky.

I think finding the voice for Clint today might be a little easier as it’s been really well-defined by some excellent writers in the last few years—most notably Matt Fraction. So you just try to learn from what others have done and carve your own path a bit; make it your own. I think I found a really happy medium with Clint that feels true to who he is and what he’s currently going through. It continues that magical chemistry that he and Kate have together and that the fans love so much.

Marvel.com: In terms of tone, how does the book feel? And how does Leonardo Romero help you bring that to life?

Kelly Thompson: Leo and [colorist] Jordie [Bellaire] remain my rock…or, rocks. They have been simply the best art team a writer could hope for. They bring such energy and innovation to everything they do, and I think we have a lot of fun with Clint’s inclusion in the book. Adding new elements—especially a character as charismatic as Clint—can be dangerous in shifting the tone or upsetting an existing balance, but with the team we have in place, I have no worries. They have so much talent that every challenge you throw at them just makes their work shine all the brighter. And even though Clint will be a large element to add, he fits rather seamlessly into a Hawkeye world, obviously, and the ways in which he doesn’t fit into Kate’s new life turn into things we have a lot of fun with.

Marvel.com: Individually speaking, where do we find the two Hawkeyes’ states of mind as they enter the story? How do they feel about one another right now?

Kelly Thompson: They’re both actually in very emotional places and not really at the top of their game. Kate has been of course going through the wringer with her father turning out to be an even worse guy than she suspected, Madame Masque taking over her life, plus the revelation that her mother may have been killed by her father—or may still be alive…she’s turmoil central.

But Clint finds himself having an awful time too, after the events of Secret Empire and the tragedy of losing one of the touchstones of his life—Black Widow. I think that might be one of the reasons they seek each other out now, because they’ll find comfort, normalcy, and a whole lot of trust in one another. They’re family.

Marvel.com: Can we expect Kate to encounter any other familiar faces as she enters Legacy?

Kelly Thompson: This arc finds Kate trying to get to the bottom of what really happened with her mother while still trying to deal with Madame Masque, who has been upping her revenge game of late. There will also be a villain “new” to Kate and Clint on the scene, but it will be someone readers have seen before if they’ve been reading my work.

Marvel.com: For readers who haven’t picked up the book yet, why does this arc present a great opportunity to hop aboard?

Kelly Thompson: I think the answer would be the same for both potential new readers and old readers alike—Clint and Kate are simply magic together. They have a fantastic chemistry and things will never get boring when they team up.

Kelly Thompson and artist Leonardo Romero’s HAWKEYE #13 hits the target on October 4!

Read More