The next episode of "Marvel's Inhumans" airs Friday, October 6th on ABC.

In the two-hour premiere of “Marvel’s Inhumans,” Maxiumus (Iwan Rheon) wrested control of Attilan from his brother Black Bolt (Anson Mount). But with Black Bolt and most of the Royal Family having fled to Earth, what is next for Maximus?

The clip above from Friday night’s new episode gives us a hint, as we see Maximus again confer with Bronaja (Ari Dalbert) about what might be waiting behind an ominous door. With Bronaja able to see visions of the future, can he help Maximus prepare for what awaits him?

The next episode of “Marvel’s Inhumans,” “Divide and Conquer,” airs Friday, October 6th at 9|8c on ABC.

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See how a battle with Thanos over his son irrevocably changes the Inhumans forever!

Bred by an alien race to be a warrior caste and possessing alien DNA, the Inhumans exist as humans possessed of incredible and otherworldly powers when exposed to the substance known as Terrigen. Living secretly, for the most part, among their fellow man, the Inhumans forge their own destiny as a separate society. Dig into the history of the Inhumans with these Marvel Unlimited comics in preparation for “Marvel’s Inhumans” heading to IMAX and ABC this fall!

After putting his spin on the Fantastic Four, Jonathan Hickman set his sights on the Avengers and the whole Marvel Universe beyond that. He started weaving an epic story that ultimately ended with SECRET WARS, but began in the pages of NEW AVENGERS and THE AVENGERS. Smack dab in the middle, he threatened the entire planet with one angry god: Thanos!

INFINITY ran through both Avengers books as well as its own six issue, self-titled limited series and dealt with Thanos, his Black Order and their dastardly plans. While many of the Avengers headed into outer space to fight one front, Iron Man, Mr. Fantastic, Namor, Dr. Strange, Black Panther and others remained on Earth where the Black Order struck on Thanos’ orders.

One of Thanos’ Outriders snuck into Attilan and read Black Bolt’s mind, revealing that he and the other members of the Illuminati once held the Infinity Gems. Meanwhile, Maximus worked on finding a dimension so the king could converse and also a Terrigen Bomb, both at Blackagar’s request.

Thanos then sent Corvus Glaive to request that the Inhumans kill all of their own between the ages of 16 and 22. It didn’t take long for Black Bolt to realize that this covered the Mad Titan’s true intention, to find his long-lost son, Thane!

Black Bolt then sent the Inhumans away and met with Thanos alone on Attilan. Refusing to give quarter, Black Bolt shouted at his opposition and destroyed the city himself, but not his foe. The attack also unleashed the Terrigen Bomb which started changing anyone with Inhuman genes around the world, including Thane who developed some kind of death-granting powers.

Thanos attained the upper hand on Black Bolt, took him to Wakanda’s Necropolis and attached him to a machine to use the king as a weapon. Later, Maximus of all Inhumans actually saved the day with help from Lockjaw to kill the Black Order’s Supergiant.

Having survived the ordeal, Black Bolt and Maximus discussed the future of the Inhumans high in the Himalayas. Well, Maximus did the talking as you can imagine. Anyway, Blackagar’s brother pointed out that the Terrigen Bomb actually marked the creation of a new age for Inhumans. At the very end of the story, they realized that Black Bolt’s power had been greatly reduced and planned on keeping it a secret from everyone else.

THE INHUMAN CONDITION

If you haven’t readINFINITY, you might be wondering why Thanos demanded Thane’s location from Black Bolt when the offspring didn’t actually reside in Attilan. As explained in FANTASTIC FOUR #577 – another Hickman-penned entry – a long ago argument amongst Inhuman royals lead to a split wherein each one left with their own people to populate different areas. Each group developed their own brand of Terrigenesis. The group that wound up in the hidden city of Orollan, but before that encountered Thanos. One of the women returned with the Titan’s spawn growing inside her. Thane turned into an adept healer until his true nature came to the surface when Black Bolt set off the Terrigen Bomb.

Find out what happens after the Terrigent Mist start spreading across the Earth in the INHUMANITY event!

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Watch 'Marvel’s Inhumans' early in IMAX theatres 9/1, and the complete series on ABC 9/29!

Behold The Royal Family! As the Great American Solar Eclipse cast its shadow from west to east, the Inhumans triumphantly emerges in seven new character posters from “Marvel’s Inhumans.”

Get a look at the Royal Family in the gallery above, featuring Black Bolt, Medusa, Maximus, Gorgon, Karnak, Triton and Crystal. The first chapter of “Marvel’s Inhumans” will premiere early in IMAX theatres for a limited two-week run beginning on September 1, 2017. ABC will then air the entirety of the series, including additional exclusive content, starting on Sept. 29.

Pre-sale tickets for “Marvel’s Inhumans” in IMAX are now available online: www.BeInhumanInIMAX.com.

Stay tuned to Marvel.com and follow @TheInhumans on Twitter and Inhumans on Facebook for the latest!

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Al Ewing talks about the recently revealed truth behind ‘Black Bolt’!

Never one to stand on ceremony, Mad Maximus saw a problem and decided to solve it. The dilemma? His brother, the near sainted Black Bolt had gone too far and not for the first time.

So, as revealed in ROYALS #2, Maximus seized the moment and impersonated his sibling as the Royal Family launched itself into space.

With the real Black Bolt trapped in some remote location, the family seems stuck with Maximus amongst them. However, what if he really did make the right decision for the good of the Inhumans? In advance of May 17’s ROYALS #3, Ewing helpfully dropped in on us to present the case for Maximus seizing his brother’s identity at an even earlier date.

Joins the Illuminati

“Yeah, this was just your basic autocratic stuff,” Ewing comments. “Just a king, chilling out with his fellow kings, deciding the fate of the rest of the planet, nothing to see there.”

“The world had to actually be ending before T’Challa got involved with that, but Black Bolt was there from the get-go,” he elaborates. “And he didn’t consult the Inhumans, either. How can we trust the king not to sell Attilan down the river to the super-celebrities? Why is he talking to known jerk Professor Charles Xavier before consulting his own Queen? It’s not a good look. If Maximus had swapped places with him, the Illuminati would have been dancing to Attilan’s tune, not vice versa.”

Declares war on the United States over the crystals used in Terrigen Mist

“Well, getting the crystals back from the U.S. government was a priority for the Inhumans, but the way Black Bolt went about it wasn’t exactly ideal,” argues the writer. “A lot of humans and Inhumans died, Gorgon was mutated for a while, and while Maximus was able to use the situation to his advantage, who can say he wouldn’t have done even better if he’d been in charge? He might have gone about it in a less obvious way. Or he might have built a giant ray gun that didn’t work properly, because [sometimes] he rolls that way too.”

Overthrowing the Kree government and seizing power for himself

“It’s not much of a spoiler that there are people who don’t remember this move fondly,” Ewing reveals. “Ronan is out there, remembering every detail of how he put his trust in the Inhumans—indeed, he put all his weight and power in Kree society behind their new regime—and then they just left without warning the moment Black Bolt decided they had better things to do. And after that, of course, Hala was blown to pieces and everyone on Hala died.”

“And now Ronan’s about to come face to face with the Royals as their quest takes them to the dead planet,” he continues. “Looking at it that way, maybe Maximus was wrong to swap places with Black Bolt; it might have been better to let his older brother face the music…”

The release of Terrigen Mists across the Earth that started IvX and forcibly changed many people’s lives without their consent

“Well, Maximus actually helped with that one,” admits Ewing. “And he’d probably have done the same thing himself. But the important thing is that it was Black Bolt’s idea, which means Maximus is completely blameless and it’s entirely right that Black Bolt is being shot off to a space prison in his place.”

Causing the accidental death of his parents and his brother’s traumatic brain injury through the use of his sonic voice

“And this is the big one,” insists the writer. “As we’ll see in issue #3, there was a little more going on that day than we’ve seen before; we’re going to be getting deep into the secrets of the family Boltagon, the secret origin of Maximus the Mad, and why exactly Maximus betrayed the Inhumans to the Kree that time—which was why Black Bolt used his super-voice in the first place. It’s all going to come out and once you know the full story, maybe you’ll agree with Maximus that he was right all along to do what he did. Or maybe he’ll be scarier than ever.”

Sit down with the family Boltagon for some quality time in ROYALS #3, available May 17 from Al Ewing and Jonboy Meyers!

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Charles Soule discloses how the legacy of a dead Inhuman will rock the race moving forward!

UNCANNY INHUMANS writer Charles Soule has big plans for the Kree-created race, and for the daughters of Auran, an Inhuman cop murdered at the whim of Maximus.

We talked to Charles about the fallen officer, her daughters Treste and Irelle, their plan to bring her back to life, and what that means for the future of the Inhumans.

Marvel.com: It looks like the next big Inhuman threat comes from within and this time, astoundingly, it’s not Maximus bent on tearing Attilan to the ground! What’s going on there?

Charles Soule: This story delves deep into the larger Inhuman mythology I’ve been building for a few years now. Back in INHUMAN #78, we met a very cool “cop” from New Attilan—a woman named Auran who had powers of enhanced hearing. She died in that issue, after Maximus the Mad used his brother Black Bolt as a weapon and blasted her into atoms. It was pretty sad, especially since she left two teenaged daughters behind. I’ve been hearing about her from fans ever since that story, and while I brought her back for a bit in my INHUMANS: ATTILAN RISING series during Secret Wars, it’s pretty clear that people would like more storytelling about Auran in the main series. Well…here you go.

Marvel.com: Can you tell us a little about her daughters Treste and Irelle and what they’re planning?

Charles Soule: They’re a bit different; Irelle is handmaiden to Queen Medusa. She’s reserved, very smart, a bit quiet. Treste is more brash. We’ve seen her on a few adventures, especially UNCANNY INHUMANS #10, which was a pretty intense issue focusing on another important Inhuman, Reader. I don’t want to spoil too much about what they have planned, but it’s a big story, the kind of thing two grieving young people, who miss their mother very much, might put together. I should also mention that neither has gone through Terrigenesis, the process which gives Inhumans their powers. Lots of interesting room for both of them to grow.

Marvel.com: The Quiet Room is playing a bigger and bigger role in the Inhuman universe as both a bar and a place for less respectable dealings. How does the Quiet Room fit into the Inhumans’ new normal?

Charles Soule: Well, ever since Black Bolt ceased being king of the Inhumans, he’s been busying himself running a nightclub under Grand Central Station in New York City. The Quiet Room is sort of a Rick’s Café for the Marvel Universe, a place of absolute neutrality, where anyone can go to negotiate deals or work out differences, no matter which “side” they’re on. After all, with one of the most powerful beings in the Marvel U running the joint, no one’s going to start any trouble. Of course, it’s also a lynchpin for behind-the-scenes work to advance the Inhuman cause. If New Attilan and Queen Medusa are the public face of Inhumanity, the Quiet Room is like the headquarters of its black ops division.

Marvel.com: Does Black Bolt feel any guilt over Auran’s death? Could he be helping her daughters find a way to bring her back despite the dangers?

Charles Soule: I suspect that Black Bolt feels guilt over any number of things—but you’d never know it, because he’s not known for talking about his feelings. Even though he was being mind-controlled by Maximus when he killed Auran, I’m certain he feels bad about it. Who wouldn’t?

Marvel.com: And this sounds like something Frank McGee might have a problem with, especially if it’s going to endanger Inhuman lives. Where does he fit into all this?

Charles Soule: Frank McGee, or Nur, as he’s known in some Inhuman circles—although Frank hates that name—used to be a NYC cop before he went through Terrigenesis. Now, he works as head of security for New Attilan. That job used to belong to Auran, though—and in fact, the case where Auran died was Frank’s very first time working with the New Attilan security bureau. He didn’t know Auran long, but they became pretty tight; so much so that he now raises Treste and Irelle, almost as their adopted father. Auran died saving Frank’s life, so he has a huge debt to her…and any story involving her is going to have him in the mix in a big way.

Make sure to check out UNCANNY INHUMANS #15 by Charles Soule and RB Bernardino when it drops in October for all the juicy details, and stay tuned to Marvel.com for more news and interviews!

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Producer Justin Woods talks about introducing Crystal, the duplicity of Maximus, new Inhuman tech, and much more!

From the pages of INHUMAN to the winter of “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” the Inhumans have been making their presence felt everywhere—and now they’re taking over “Marvel: Avengers Alliance.”

With Black Bolt, Medusa, Gorgon, and Karnak already entrenched in the game, the latest “Avengers Alliance” Spec Op ramps up the Inhuman adventure and introduces the elemental Crystal as well as the villainous Maximus the Mad. The return of the Black Order will press the entire Royal Family into action and throw loyalties into question.

We spoke to Producer Justin Woods about the new characters, how this story plays out, what players can ear, and why the Inhumans stand out even among the Marvel pantheon.

Marvel.com: So what is the plot of this new Spec Op featuring the Inhumans, Justin?

Justin Woods: Thanos has been kind of absent from our story for a little while, and he comes back in a pretty big way in this Spec Op. He comes down to Earth with the Black Order, and Maximus the Mad, one of the very famous Inhuman villains but also a member of the royal family, steps in to help S.H.I.E.L.D. fight [them] off. Little do they know that Maximus has brokered a deal with Thanos behind the scenes, and there’s a little bit of him playing both sides right now that is really, really interesting. And how it ends up working out in the end is pretty remarkable, so I think that people are gonna be really happy with the story, especially people who read the Infinity storyline. There were some of the things about the Infinity storyline in the comic books that we did not do with Spec Op 13, where we introduced Black Bolt. We’re taking other elements of the Infinity storyline and working them into a greater Inhumans story, where we’re introducing Maximus the Mad and reward hero Crystal; so, a very exciting time for Inhumans fans.

Marvel.com: That’s very different, having someone who’s kind of both on your side and not on your side; that’s a bit unprecedented. Because usually by the time a character comes over as like a lock box hero or something, they are redeemed. You’re telling me Maximus is a little bit more ambiguous, but we do get to have him as an ally?

Justin Woods: Well you don’t actually play as him, but he is actually helping S.H.I.E.L.D. He’s helping you guys out and giving you hints and clues on how to defeat Thanos, but like I said, there’s more to it than meets the eye, as there always is with Maximus. So it’s going to be really interesting. It’s hard for me to say too much about the story without spoiling it, because it has several different twists along the way. But I think that, like I said, people who that are fans of the Inhumans, people who enjoyed the Infinity story line, and people that just enjoy stories that have some unpredictable angles are really gonna like this one.

Marvel.com: Crystal is the reward hero; what are we looking at from her as far as abilities?

Justin Woods: Crystal is sort of your somewhat prototypical elemental mage. She’s got a lot of elemental, fire and ice type attacks. Things like that.

Marvel.com: It’s cool that Thanos sends out the Black Order, because at this point they feel special in terms of your game. In terms of the Marvel Universe, they’ve really only been in Infinity and now they’re showing up for Time Runs Out. But in “Avengers Alliance,” I feel like they showed up once in the chapters. I could be wrong, but they’re primarily Spec Ops.

Maximus in Avengers Alliance

Maximus in Avengers Alliance

Justin Woods: Yeah, so this will be the third primary use of them for Spec Ops, but they’re really a focus in this particular storyline. And we really like those characters, even though they don’t have a ton of lore dating back to the 70’s or whatever. You know, Marvel creates really amazing characters, and these are characters that we’re excited about. We really enjoy using them in the game because their power sets are very interesting. So I think that people are really going to enjoy playing with them again. They’re just really cool characters.

Marvel.com: So in terms of who’s stepping to the forefront of this campaign, aside from Crystal? Are there other heroes pitching in as well?

Justin Woods: They really are. Black Bolt is front and center in this story line, actually, and Tony Stark, although we see him all the time and he’s always running his mouth, he had some pretty central character development in this Spec Op. So if you love Iron Man, this will also be a really great time for Iron Fans. It’s awesome. There are so many exciting things that I just really want to talk about! Like the twists and turns. But like I said, Maximus is a really sneaky, smart dude, and like I hinted at, he’s playing both sides pretty well to his own end.

Marvel.com: So, are there any other villain characters that are going to be introduced here?

Justin Woods: Well, Maximus; you may or may not fight Maximus eventually.

Marvel.com: And then location-wise, kind of sticking to the ones we’ve seen? You guys just dropped in the Savage Land and it takes a little while to create new environments.

Justin Woods: Yeah, there [are] no new ones here, but we’re definitely going back and hitting Wakanda again. I mean, we want to get good leverage out of all of our amazing environments that we’ve dropped so far. There are more environments in the mix for later on, down the road, but we’re not quite there yet.

Marvel.com: What sort of weapons and tech people can pick up for this Spec Op?

Justin Woods: In War of Kings, they harness Black Bolt’s energy signature from his sonic [powers], and they weaponize it. And [the Inhumans] take over the Kree Empire with it. We loved that idea a lot and we may be are doing some stuff with that.

Marvel.com: We just announced “Inhumans” as a film property coming up in a few years. INHUMAN is big in the comics right now and the characters are coming to “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” so this is definitely very timely. What’s it like for you guys to kind of be able to tap into a character group that is so big across platforms right now?

Justin Woods: We do know that the Inhumans are really central to what they’re doing in the comic book space right now, and that was a big part of our decision to do a storyline around these characters. For a long time we wanted to introduce the entire royal family and slowly they’ve been making their way into the game. Now that we have so many of those characters, as you outlined before, we wanted to kind of centralize them and bring them together and give them a story that is their own. It would be almost as if we were doing a comic book that’s an Inhumans one shot, double-sized, or something like that. We’ve been wanting to do an Inhumans thing for a long time, and we’re finally getting a chance. This is the same thing we do with other teams. We try and trickle in the characters over time and then we’re like, “Okay. Now we have enough of them. Now we can do a Spec Op around them.” It’s tough to put a bunch of heroes in the game all at once.

Crystal in Avengers Alliance

Crystal in Avengers Alliance

Marvel.com: Finally, I always like to ask you this, Justin, because you’re such a fan. What do you think’s cool about the Inhumans and who’s you’re favorite Inhuman?

Justin Woods: I think the Inhumans are cool because they are both alien but they’re not. And so they’re relatable in that way. I also think that they’re somewhat tragic. Like, if you look at them, in a lot of ways, they’re similar to guys like the Morlocks in the X-Men universe. They have the powers, but for some of those guys, the powers are both a burden and a blessing. And you look at Black Bolt as the king, nobody has it both better and worse than him, right? He’s as powerful as can be, but he can’t talk! That’s just kind of the sort of horrible burden that he has. So I think they’re a somewhat relatable group of characters. They have a unique and interesting power set. I love the city of Attilan and the idea that their [home] moves and floats around to wherever they need it to be. They were everywhere from the Himalayas to the moon. And as far as my favorite Inhuman character? I think it’s Black Bolt. I think Black Bolt is cool because, again, the idea that he is so incredibly powerful, but in having all of that power, he doesn’t have one of the basic things that we take for granted as human beings, which is the ability to speak to one another. He relies on telepathy and a number of other things to be able to communicate with the members of his own family. That’s something that I find really interesting.

Marvel.com: And your feelings on Lockjaw?

Justin Woods: I think Lockjaw’s amazing. We are trying to find a way to work Lockjaw into the game that makes sense and is a good service to Lockjaw and Lockjaw’s fans that would make sense. So he may or may not be a playable character in the game, but we’re finding a way to make sure that he gets in the game someday. So no announcements as of right now, but we’re working on something.

Join “Marvel: Avengers Alliance” and play the Inhumans Lands Spec Op today!

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The longest-running FF editor of all-time picks classic tales from the seminal run by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby!

By Kiel Phegley

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s groundbreaking run on Marvel’s FANTASTIC FOUR doesn’t  just stand among the most innovative comics of its time, but it also marks one of the longest collaboration in comics. That’s why it’s no surprise that our celebration of the original comic of the Marvel Age—as guided by SVP of Publishing and Executive Editor, and record-setting FF Editor Tom Brevoort—runs extra-long as we kick into the most famed FF issues!

Once the Marvel Universe had been well established in the mid 1960’s, Lee and Kirby tasked themselves with expanding the world with new characters, concepts and locales.

“There is definitely a paradigm shift that happens around then,” says Brevoort. “In 1965, Lee and Kirby came up with a bunch of new stuff that could be books. They came up with the Inhumans, the Black Panther and almost accidentally with the Silver Surfer. These were all meant to be their own books at one point, but as it turns out [Publisher] Martin Goodman couldn’t get their distributor to lift the restrictions—or lift them that much. They let them add Western books and comedy books and teen books, but they were very reticent to let them have anymore super hero space because at that point, they were a little afraid of the success Marvel was having.”

While it took years for some of their creations to finally land their own Marvel series, Lee and Kirby still delivered one jaw-dropping story after another. Read on as Brevoort explains the creative history of some of the biggest hits in comics history.

Fantastic Four (1961) #44

Fantastic Four (1961) #44

  • Published: November 10, 1965
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

FANTASTIC FOUR #44

The high period of the FANTASTIC FOUR started with the introduction of the Inhumans, the secret race that lived on the edges of the Marvel Universe. But beyond introducing Black Bolt, Medusa and the rest of the royal family in the story that began in FANTASTIC FOUR #44, the issue stands as one of the most important for another key reason.

“The artwork takes a quantum leap as Kirby’s able to spend more time on it, and he’s got an inker in Joe Sinnott who’s way better than the guys who had been there before,” Brevoort explains. “Look at [issue] #44, the first issue to introduce Gorgon of the Inhumans, and it’s like they come from different planets; how different and more sophisticated the art suddenly looks. That’s got everything to do with what Sinnott brought to the table.”

Fantastic Four (1961) #48

Fantastic Four (1961) #48

  • Published: March 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

FANTASTIC FOUR #48

The hits kept coming as one titanic story arc gave way to another in FANTASTIC FOUR #48, the issue the introduced two of the most important characters in Marvel history.

“You start to see the guest appearances from other Marvel characters fall away and the book go more into the sort of big sci-fi ideas that Kirby was interested in; it really almost becomes a different book,” Brevoort says of the era where the Silver Surfer and Galactus were introduced.

“It’s the coming of Galactus,” Brevoort says of the issue’s main draw. “In seven pages, they wrap up the Inhuman story where Maximus fires off his Atmo-Gun which will destroy the atmosphere for normal human beings so only Inhumans can survive. It doesn’t work and so he suddenly he reverses the polarity and traps them all inside the shell of the Negative Zone, and the Fantastic Four just barely make it out in time, but Crystal is trapped within the dome. The Torch’s heart is broken, and he’s on a quest to break her free. But on their way back, rocks appear in the sky and everything is aflame. People start to riot, and they have to get involved in that. Then the Watcher appears to declare ‘Hey, big things are happening. Galactus is on his way here, and he’s going to eat the Earth!’ Everything builds up to the last page where the Silver Surfer shows up and Ben punches him across town. Then Galactus lands on the Baxter Building and is going to eat the earth.

“It’s the same two guys doing the book, and it’s just completely different. While it’s kind of got the same surface sheen, the fun and excitement of it is still there, but the stakes are a million times bigger. The concepts are greater and grander. The artwork is slicker and more pristine. It is the cutting edge. It’s at the forefront not just of super hero comics but of comics.”

Fantastic Four (1961) #51

Fantastic Four (1961) #51

  • Published: June 10, 1966
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

FANTASTIC FOUR #51

Not to be outdone by their first major cosmic saga, Lee and Kirby followed Galactus with “This Man…This Monster,” perhaps their most personal exploration of Ben Grimm as a character.

“As a single issue that you can just pick up and read to get the sum and substance of what the series is about and how it works with both its scale and humanity, there’s probably not another book that does the job as well as #51,” Brevoort contends.

“Even with that, we all make a lot of suppositions about what each guy brought to the table and what their interests were. I’ve heard tell from people who were there and talked to both Stan and Jack back in the day, and when they’ve looked at the evidence, they say you’d be surprised at the stuff you’d think were clearly Stan ideas that came from Kirby or you’d clearly think were Kirby ideas that came from Stan. The credits started reflecting this around that time; they stop being ‘Stan Lee, Writer, and Jack Kirby, Artist’ and turn into ‘A Stan Lee/Jack Kirby Production.’ And I think that’s right. It’s hard to tell at that point where one guy stops and the other guy starts, but those books certainly wouldn’t be those books without both of them.”

Fantastic Four (1961) #62

Fantastic Four (1961) #62

  • Published: May 10, 1967
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

FANTASTIC FOUR #62

While FANTASTIC FOUR around issue #50 fired on all cylinders, it would not be the only era of the book that brought brand new ideas to the table. Brevoort points to #62—the first appearance of Negative Zone heavy Blastaar—as a moment that kick started the second wave of innovation in the title.

“That run may not be as seminally remembered as Inhumans to Galactus to Surfer to ‘This Man…’ to Black Panther, but that’s a pretty great run that people have generated a lot of stories on; Blastaar alone is a character that there are probably 50 Marvel comics about,” he says. “Certainly up through #67 or #69, they were still introducing a lot of stuff. Probably the last big new character was Adam Warlock—or ‘Him’—in the two Beehive issues. But right before that was Ronan and right before that was the Kree Sentry, and right before that was Blastaar.”

Fantastic Four (1961) #74

Fantastic Four (1961) #74

  • Published: May 10, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

FANTASTIC FOUR #74

The opening chapter of Lee and Kirby’s last great Silver Surfer/Galactus epic proved indicative of the brilliance of their later run, Brevoort explains, even when most people forget how deep the creators were able to take their core characters:

“People tend to remember the years of maximum innovation more than they remember the days of expansion and evolution. It’s not as exciting developing that stuff as it was creating it. But they do this big story with Galactus and the Silver Surfer that takes them into the Microverse and sets them up to be characters around the Marvel Universe. They do a story with Doctor Doom about what it’s like to live in Latveria that’s almost a riff on ‘The Prisoner’ television series where the Fantastic Four are trapped in a little city, but you also get to see things from Doom’s perspective for a while in #84. The same thing happens when Ben Grimm is captured by the Skrulls and taken off to gladiatorial games on a planet that looks like a 1920’s gangster movies in #92 and #93. That was expansionist but not really a new thing.”

Fantastic Four Annual (1963) #6

Fantastic Four Annual (1963) #6

  • Published: November 06, 1968
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: March 20, 2009
  • Penciller: Jack Kirby
  • Cover Artist: Jack Kirby
What is Marvel Unlimited?

FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #6

Of course, everyone who knows FANTASTIC FOUR knows that it’s a story of family first, and the crowning achievement in that line of storytelling came with FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #6, the culmination of Sue Storm’s pregnancy with son Franklin Richards.

“The stuff that tended to keep pushing forward was the character interpersonal stuff like the pregnancy,” says Brevoort. “The birth of Franklin and the naming of Franklin was stuff that had been done in newspaper strips, and television had done that. ‘I Love Lucy’ kind of broke those barriers on TV. But while there had been weddings before the Fantastic Four in comics—one or two—there really hadn’t been a child birth that was handled in this sort of manner. It underscored the notion that Lee and Kirby were treating the Fantastic Four as action adventure super heroes but also as a tight nit nuclear family who were moving forward in their lives. It was more about that than it was about the exciting new villain of the month, though you got some of those too.”

Visit marvel.com/75 for more 75th Anniversary celebration and share your thoughts on Twitter using the hash tag #Marvel75

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Editor Tom Brevoort talks about the finale of Infinity, including what it means for the Avengers, Thanos and the Inhumans!

Download 'This Week in Marvel' Episode 112.5

Download ‘This Week in Marvel’ Episode 112.5

Editor Tom Brevoort swings by to wrap up INFINITY, discussing the art process, what comes next and much more, plus answering your questions!

Download episode #112.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com, check out Marvel Podcast Centralgrab the TWiM RSS feed and subscribe to This Week in Marvel on iTunes or Zune, so you never miss an episode!

This Week in Marvel will focus on delivering all the Marvel info on news and new releases–from comics to video games to toys to TV to film and beyond! New episodes will be released every Tuesday and Thursday (or so) and TWiM is co-hosted by Marvel Digital Media Group Executive Editorial Director Ryan “Agent M” Penagos and Marvel.com Editor Ben Morse with Associate Producer Blake Garris and Associate Editor Marc Strom. 

We also want your feedback, as well as questions for us to answer on future episodes! Tweet your questions, comments and thoughts about TWiM to @AgentM@BenJMorse or @Marvel with the hashtag #ThisWeekinMarvel! And if your message is longer than 140 characters, send it through fans.marvel.com!

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Tom Brevoort returns to discuss the third issue of Infinity, with Captain America, Black Bolt and much more!

Download episode #101.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com

Senior VP – Executive Editor Tom Brevoort returns to the podcast to discuss the third issue of INFINITY as well as AVENGERS #20 and more, covering the behind the scenes of creating the story as well as discussion of the Kree and Skrulls, Gladiator, Captain America, Thanos, Black Bolt, Maximus and more! Pick up INFINITY #4 this week!

Download episode #101.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com, check out Marvel Podcast Centralgrab the TWiM RSS feed and subscribe to This Week in Marvel on iTunes or Zune, so you never miss an episode!

This Week in Marvel will focus on delivering all the Marvel info on news and new releases–from comics to video games to toys to TV to film and beyond! New episodes will be released every Tuesday and Thursday (or so) and TWiM is co-hosted by Marvel Digital Media Group Executive Editorial Director Ryan “Agent M” Penagos and Marvel.com Editor Ben Morse with Associate Producer Blake Garris and Associate Editor Marc Strom. 

We also want your feedback, as well as questions for us to answer on future episodes! Tweet your questions, comments and thoughts about TWiM to @AgentM@BenJMorse or @Marvel with the hashtag #ThisWeekinMarvel! And if your message is longer than 140 characters, send it through fans.marvel.com!

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Tom Brevoort returns to discuss the second issue of Infinity, the Avengers, Thanos, the Inhumans and much more!

Download episode #98.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com

Senior VP – Executive Editor Tom Brevoort returns to the podcast just in time to discuss the second issue of INFINITY as well as AVENGERS #19 and more, covering the behind the scenes of creating the story as well as discussion of the Avengers, Thanos, Black Bolt, Captain Marvel, Gladiator, the Black Order and more!

Download episode #98.5 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com, check out Marvel Podcast Centralgrab the TWiM RSS feed and subscribe to This Week in Marvel on iTunes or Zune, so you never miss an episode!

This Week in Marvel will focus on delivering all the Marvel info on news and new releases–from comics to video games to toys to TV to film and beyond! New episodes will be released every Tuesday and Thursday (or so) and TWiM is co-hosted by Marvel Digital Media Group Executive Editorial Director Ryan “Agent M” Penagos and Marvel.com Editor Ben Morse with Associate Producer Blake Garris and Associate Editor Marc Strom. 

We also want your feedback, as well as questions for us to answer on future episodes! Tweet your questions, comments and thoughts about TWiM to @AgentM@BenJMorse or @Marvel with the hashtag #ThisWeekinMarvel! And if your message is longer than 140 characters, send it through fans.marvel.com!

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