How is it to live every day seeing the flaws in everyone and everything?

The client, Karnak Mander-Azur, is a self-identified Inhuman and longtime advisor to the Royal Family. Currently he belongs to an Inhuman/S.H.I.E.L.D. collaborative organization known as the Secret Warriors, although I am unclear on whether or not this is a formal designation or a colloquial title adopted by the group. He presents as a man in above average physical health who is noticeable by the facials tattoos that indicate his membership in a religious movement known as the Tower of Wisdom.

Karnak joined the movement after his parents refused to let him undergo the Terrigenesis process due to how the Mists affected his brother Triton. Instead, Karnak studied under the Wisdom monks, learning both philosophy and a variety of martial arts. These studies are credited with his abilities — the client is a master planner who is evidently able to see the flaws in everything including people, objects, and plans — although it is unclear if this is a “power” or just a highly developed skill. It also marks him as distinctly different from the rest of the Inhuman population who undergo exposure to the Mists; while not all react to the gas and change, participation in the process is nearly 100 percent. The combination of his experiences, his skillset, and being this literal outlier often leaves him feeling very separate from others. In therapy, we have also explored if he furthers this sense of separation on his own, choosing it instead of reaching out, but so far the client is fairly resistant to this avenue of discussion.

Karnak has recently undergone some fairly significant life changes. In the first place, in response to knowledge he still has not fully articulated, he ended his own life. Through a process this writer confesses he does not wholly understand, but hinges on another Inhuman that was genetically related to Karnak that could absorb the genetic memories of dead Inhumans, Karnak was reborn. While retaining his memories, he lost his distinctive head shape. While this seems to have cost him nothing, it is worth note as it is significant change to his appearance.

Secret Warriors  (2017) #12

Secret Warriors (2017) #12

Since his rebirth, he has been far more paranoid, secretive, and withdrawn as well. While being a member of a team, he often seems to be working at odds with their goals or following a very different route without explaining or alerting his teammates to his choices.

Additionally, most of the Royal family, arguably the individuals he is closest to and calls friends and family, have left the planet and did so largely without explanation. While he largely downplays this development on his psyche, for an individual who is slow to trust and has few supports, this sudden loss of so many people from his life has undoubtedly affected him.

Due to his overall hesitance to open up, much of our therapy has been focused on daily coping skills. With his ability to see flaws everywhere, day-to-day life is a series of encounters that scream at him to solve problems that he cannot, for many reasons, starting with the fact that it is impossible to make a person perfect. For another example, it is difficult to get anyone to listen to you when you claim there is a structural flaw in a building that will cause it to collapse in 96 years. We are working on active ignoring, how to evaluate which flaws are fixable and worth focusing on now, which can be delayed, and which, ultimately, must be accepted. Along with this we are working on emotion regulation to help him connect better with others and reduce his susceptibility to anger, disappointment, etc., with normal human failings. Lastly, we have been practicing mindfulness techniques, something the client has taken to very well given his experiences in studies in the Tower of Wisdom.

As part of his therapeutic process, Karnak Mander-Azur has agreed to attend a group session as a kind of exposure therapy for managing his emotions and his reactions to the flaws of others. He will attend Doctors Matthew Rosenberg and Javi Garron’s group starting on January 10, 2018 and information on his progress with be available in file SECRET WARRIORS #12.

Psy D. Candidate Tim Stevens is a Staff Therapist who thinks you—yes, you!—are flawless.

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Matthew Rosenberg’s Sinister plot puts the Warriors on the run!

It makes sense that a dude who has an obsession with evolution would go after the Inhumans. But that infatuation soon becomes an existential threat, forcing the Secret Warriors into hiding.

On December 13, writer Matthew Rosenberg joins artists Javier Garrón and Will Robson to deal the Inhuman squad an impossible hand in SECRET WARRIORS #10! So how will they play their cards? We caught up with Rosenberg to get a few ideas.

Marvel.com: What do you think makes Mister Sinister such a great antagonist for the Secret Warriors?

Matthew Rosenberg: First of all, he’s amazing. So there’s that.

I’ve always loved Sinister because he is the classic mad scientist of the X-universe. He’s smart, driven, and more than a little psychotic, and that can be such a great combination. And obviously we all know him as an X-Men villain, but here he gets mixed up with our little team. I think the idea of them getting mixed up with one of the most dangerous X-villains just makes sense. This team only works well when they are in over their head and can’t turn back.

Marvel.com: Sinister has a fascination with the science of human evolution, so it seems likely that he’d be interested in the Warriors and their Inhuman DNA…

Matthew Rosenberg: I think Sinister is fascinating because of his obsession with genetics and evolution. We spend all this time reading about the adventures of these super heroes who differ genetically from the average human, and he’s the villain that has as much of a fascination about that as we do. He doesn’t take mutations and Terrigenesis for granted. He wants to know how they work, to conquer them. It’s a logical idea, but also terrifying, because he will do anything to get his answers. He is a man ruled by obsessions and that obsession is now Inhumans.

For the Warriors, jumping in between Sinister and the Inhumans he’s after definitely won’t be good. But that might be what makes them heroes…or just dumb. I guess we’ll find out which.

Marvel.com: Sinister has a pretty complicated history with mutants. Does this inform his views on the Inhumans and the Warriors?

Matthew Rosenberg: Yeah, I think Sinister really likes two things: figuring out the things no one else can figure out and preying on the vulnerable. Those go hand in hand for him. Mutants, as a group, have amazing powers but are hated and feared by society. That makes them easy targets for Sinister. The Inhumans, put into labor camps, having lost their leaders, with no chance to continue the species without the Terrigen Mists, seem just like the type of vulnerable that Sinister loves. So the shift in focus for him has been an obvious one. But, much like with the mutants, his relationship to the Inhumans isn’t quite what it appears. He hurts people and does unconscionable things, but he has a goal. And that goal might not be what people expect.

Marvel.com: As someone who values science and scientists, going up against Mister Sinister has to have an impact on Moon Girl, right?

Matthew Rosenberg: In a lot of ways this will be a real fork in the road for Lunella. She is a good person, no question. A hero and sweet kid, but she’s also a genius. She values science and exploring new ideas above almost anything else. In that way, Sinister looks like a cautionary tale for her. What happens when the pursuit of science and knowledge lacks humanity? It might be easy to see how Lunella could be seduced to Sinister’s way of thinking—she finds most people kind of annoying. But will she be willing to do what’s morally right to stand in the way of his quest for knowledge? I mean, probably. But read the book.

Marvel.com: Final thoughts?

Matthew Rosenberg: Mister Sinister has always been one of the great Marvel villains and I’m so happy to get the chance to throw our Warriors up against him. This will really be a test that will make or break them. Either way, there will be some crazy science, insane fights, and ice cream breaks along the way.

SECRET WARRIORS #10, by Matthew Rosenberg and artists Javier Garrón and Will Robson, drops on December 13!

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With sights set on Inhumans, the criminal geneticist drops in on Marvel.com’s Resident Therapist.

Professor,

Thank you for the invitation to speak to your class “Criminological Theory in the Age of Costumed Offenders.” I am excited for the lecture and discussion. Enclosed is a brief write up on the criminal known as “Mister Sinister.” Please distribute it to the students and ask them to read it in advance of class as I will be referring to it and calling on them to participate. Again, thank you, and I will see you next week.

The client, Nathaniel Essex — far better known as the criminal Mister Sinister — discovered that, while he was assumed dead, this writer did a presentation on him as a guest lecturer to a “Criminological Theory in the Age of Costumed Offenders” course. He claimed to be visiting to “meet the arrogant plebe who would think so highly of himself to believe himself my better,” and no other reason.

He presented with a poorly hidden wounded narcissism and insisted on being called “Mister Sinister”—as I hypothesized he would in my class presentation—throughout session. I will therefore treat that as his name for the purpose of this note.

Despite his insistence on being my better and my work being completely “misinformed and off the mark,” the client confirmed many of my hypotheses in short order. He demonstrated an underdeveloped sense of morality, a rejection of conventional rules in place to protect others besides himself, and a fulfillment of several categories necessary to diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder.

His narcissism also seemed to make it impossible for him not to, in essence, tell on himself. After confirming that his seeming obsession with the Summers family—especially the late Scott aka Cyclops—has also admitted that since that person’s death, he has found himself searching for a new purpose and found it with turning his genetics fixation to the so-called Inhumans.

As in the presentation, I feel comfortable predicting that any kind of meaningful healthy change for the client is unlikely, even with therapeutic intervention. Overall, the subject is smart, arrogant, and nearly entirely without empathy. The only reliable means of “controlling” him would seem to be to give him a project that captures his imagination and give him the free rein to explore it fully. However, what he might do in his quest to solve that problem and/or when he became bored would be, undoubtedly, wholly unacceptable.

Given this, I also would predict that it is highly unlikely Sinister will return. His arrogance permits him to see no other outcome but that he bested this writer the moment he showed up at the offices, so the actual outcome of our session is immaterial. His ego integrity returned by “showing” me, he’ll now have no compelling reason to return.

That said, this writer did do his due diligence and made a follow-up appointment for the client. However, given the dynamics in the room, should he return for the next appointment on December 13, he will be seeing Doctors Matthew Rosenberg and Javi Garron. Any session notes will be found in SECRET WARRIORS #10 file.

Psy D. Candidate Tim Stevens is a Staff Therapist who welcomes Mr. Sinister — or ANYONE else — to try and out-arrogant him.

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Matthew Rosenberg sets the Warriors up against a classic Marvel Legacy foe!

In SECRET WARRIORS #8, something wicked this way comes. Or, rather, something sinister.

On November 15, Mister Sinister turns his torturous methods on the Inhumans! Marvel Legacy dawns as writer Matthew Rosenberg joins artists Javier Garrón and Will Robson to see the Secret Warriors combat this classic villain—and more discord within their own ranks.

We asked Rosenberg for a couple of hints about what to expect in the newest issue.

Marvel.com: Given the unique physiology of the Inhumans and how they develop powers, it makes sense that Mister Sinister would be interested in them. Creatively, though, what drew you to using him in your story?

Matthew Rosenberg: Besides me being obsessed with the X-Men? Okay.

I think he’s a fascinating villain because he can be a great example of the very simple—but very hard to pull off—idea that villains don’t act as the villains of their own stories. Sinister has a brilliant mind and, if pointed in the right direction, could be doing some of the most important work in the Marvel Universe. His desire to figure out how the world works and conquer it feels truly admirable in many ways.

But he is psychotic and sees no value in the normal morality of the civilized world. It has never been hard to imagine him as one of the Hanks, as a Reed Richards-type. But he has no interest, and that fascinates me.

Marvel.com: How prepared will the Warriors be for this new threat? What do they know about Mister Sinister?

Matthew Rosenberg: They will not be prepared at all. Daisy knows him simply because she studied her S.H.I.E.L.D. files pretty well. Karnak knows who him because crazy people all know each other. But the rest of the team has not prepared at all. And in issue #8 you will see just how unprepared for playing by his rules they will really be.

Marvel.com: From the cover of #8, we see Mister Sinister sporting an unexpected look. Can you describe artist Javier Garrón’s visual conceptualization of the character? How does it inform or compliment your take on Sinister?

Matthew Rosenberg: First of all, let’s just say this. Javier is brilliant and I love working with him. With that out of the way, one of my favorite things has been that he just really likes redesigning characters. I think his instincts and design sense are awesome, but more than that, I just love the idea that all these characters just change it up sometimes. I don’t wear the same thing every day. Actually, I kind of do. But I get that seems weird. But why should super heroes? I get that they have a brand consciousness and want to be recognizable, but even baseball teams have a few different uniforms.

I think Javier’s design of Sinister feels like a great update that really helped me realize who he can be in our story. Sinister, obviously a psychotic maniac, is also cultured, sophisticated, and smart. His grand designs may not be evident to everyone, but he tries to shape the future of the world and he has a plan. This isn’t some two bit villain in tights. Mister Sinister wants to reshape the course of the human race, so of course he’ll dress like a megalomaniac too.

But what do I know? I wear shorts 365 days a year.

Marvel.com: Unfortunately, in the midst of this, Karnak seems to be pursuing his own agenda away from the team. Can you offer any insight into what might be going on with him? What kind of dangers does he expose the team to when he leaves?

Matthew Rosenberg: From the start, Karnak has his own thing going on, as I think he always does. Only this time it seems like his plans might be working in almost opposition to his teammates. An alarming disconnect appears to the team as a result. But it’s Karnak, so he might be playing the game 10 moves ahead of everyone else. But he also has shown a willingness to allow suffering and hardships to befall the people around him in ways that many would find troubling. Those two factors combined put him somewhere between callous and evil. And that will be a big factor of what happens going forward.

Marvel.com: All things considered, what kind of odds would you give this team on being able to stay together and survive the battle with Sinister?

Matthew Rosenberg: 50/50.

Check out SECRET WARRIORS #8, by Matthew Rosenberg and artists Javier Garrón and Will Robson, on November 15!

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Artist Javier Garrón brings something Sinister to the Secret Warriors!

The Inhumans continue to find themselves teetering on the edge of tomorrow, not exactly sure where they’ll fall. With the Terrigen mists destroyed in the pages of INHUMANS VS. X-MEN and the Royal Family leaving for outer space soon after, that leaves the Secret Warriors to carry on Earth-side.

That’s exactly what Matthew Rosenberg and Javier Garrón have chronicled since they launched SECRET WARRIORS earlier this year. The team fought against the Steve Rogers’ Secret Empire and now find themselves dealing with the mad geneticist Mister Sinister as they shift into the Marvel Legacy era.

We talked with Garrón about his continued familiarity with both his writer and his characters as well as what Marvel Legacy holds for his squad!

Marvel.com: With Marvel Legacy, lots of books are looking back to their roots. Many of the Secret Warriors characters are relatively new, so how does it play into your series from the art side of things?

Javier Garrón: In terms of art we’re going more into the continuity aspect of the legacy. The series began as a direct consequence of Inhumans Vs. X-Men and Secret Empire. We dealt with the latter in the first arc and epilogue and now we’re diving into exploring the consequences of the former. Legacy here comes more in terms of the Inhumans as a species and civilization than as individual characters. The Inhuman line has been stopped since there aren’t Terrigen mists anymore and that’s what we’re exploring in the second arc. The responsibility of honoring and continuing that legacy.

The story is as epic as it has been so far, quite probably even more so. Visually there’s still a lot of orchestration to be done with a lot of characters involved, many locations and some crowded action set pieces alongside the storyline. Our main heroes don’t get any redesign, but they sure look more tired and troubled with the endless series of problems they face. There’s still humor and space for some on-point visual gags, but the fatigue is starting to show visually in them.

Marvel.com: You and Matthew have been steering this ship since the beginning. How would you say your collaborative relationship has evolved in that time?

Javier Garrón: I think we’ve reached a certain point of magic, hard to achieve even intentionally. The kind of magic that is to catch what the other person is trying to convey with words in his case, or with images in mine, and pushing it further. One of my main tasks as an artist is to reflect in panels what’s in the script, so it’s understandable even without balloons, and complement it. That’s where artists put details not scripted in the character’s clothes, in the background or the lighting, for example. The magic comes when the writer notices it, those details not proposed in the script and incorporates it in following comics.

In the first arc—and this wasn’t scripted—I started a visual running joke with Inferno. Something without any kind of importance story-wise. We never even talked about it specifically, but Matt noticed it and in the second arc there’s [an] explicit reference to it, which makes the gag even greater. That sync only comes when the people involved click creatively, and I think—and hope—that’s the case.

Marvel.com: Along those same lines, do you feel like your approach to any of the characters has changed the more you’ve gotten to know them?

Javier Garrón: Undoubtedly! The more you draw, the better you are at it. And with characters it’s like with real people, you need to get to know them, at least in my case, to really, really portray them perfectly. From my perspective that has happened with Lunella and Inferno, and for two very different reasons.

The more I’ve worked with Moon Girl, the more I’ve come to realize how complex and rich that character is. A multi-layered girl, who is the smartest person in the Marvel Universe, but also an eight-year-old with a temper. That gives you serious, interesting Reed Richards kind-of-moments when she’s in genius mode, and very funny moments when she behaves more accordingly to her own age, though even then she still acts like a much older person. There’s the contrast between that hard and that soft side of her that visually is very rich, both in terms of gesticulation and design.

And then there’s Inferno, which without even having talked about it, or actively worked on it, has been kind of a comic relief, visually. In the second arc he has also a very important dramatic role, but I really love to explore his goofy side when possible. And I think I’ve gotten better at drawing his fiery flames—always in between the limits of my skill—every time I get to draw fire is even more fun than the last time I did it.

Marvel.com: Mister Sinister has also been around for a while now, messing with the Warriors and other Inhumans. Do you feel like you have a new understanding of him at this point?

Javier Garrón: I hope so! I mean, at least at some infinitesimal level, or in my interpretation of him. In comic books we’re dealing with versions, I think. This is my version of the character, which is the official one in the moment it gets published in continuity, but in two months’ time the same character can show up in another series, by another creative team, slightly different, but being then the official one at that point. So, in our version of Sinister he’s more grounded in the Marvel Universe as a whole. He’s no longer an X-Men villain, but a character that plays a larger role in the great scheme of things. Sinister’s also an even more detached being, closer to an artificial intelligence with the sole purpose of gaining knowledge than an actual living being with worries and desires. If he had them at some point, that’s gone.

I like to portray that visually in terms of design and body posture. He’s refined, but slightly outdated. He dresses elegantly, but more accordingly with the time when he was born than actual times, as if he continues to dress out of habit, not really putting his mind into it. He looks polished, but more in the way of a relic. And he always stands like a governess, strict and severe.

Marvel.com: How has it been developing new Inhumans with Matthew in this series?

Javier Garrón: It’s so much fun! Designing new characters is one of the many perks of the job and Matt is extremely collaborative when the time comes to putting our hands into it. He sets the tone, puts the foundations down, and then I have all the freedom I need to make it happen. We have lots and lots of Inhumans as background actors, and that’s when I can get as crazy as I want and time allows, because kids, in comics our budget is not money but time.

I think if we haven’t put more people into the story it’s because they can’t fit into the panels! It’s so crowded! Some characters started complaining and we had to cut the budget on this; those background Inhumans have a temper and they want to be in the shot so they can show off later with their friends! I mean, all those egos! It’s a struggle to make all our main heroes and the supporting ones happy, but that’s the comic book creator’s life!

SECRET WARRIORS continues to roll out the Earthly Inhumanity every month thanks to Matthew Rosenberg and Javier Garrón, with issue #8 hitting November 15!

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The war of the disenfranchised wages across the Marvel Universe with survival at stake. 

Bred by an alien race to be a warrior caste and possessing alien DNA, the Inhumans exist as humans possessed of incredible and otherworldly powers when exposed to the substance known as Terrigen. Living secretly, for the most part, among their fellow man, the Inhumans forge their own destiny as a separate society. Dig into the history of the Inhumans with these Marvel Unlimited comics in preparation for “Marvel’s Inhumans” heading to  ABC on September 29!  

Even when they’re not actively getting involved in major situations, the Inhumans seem to find themselves smack-dab in the middle of conflict! In this case, we’re talking about a major problem with the mutant community that actually started in THE DEATH OF X by Jeff Lemire, Charles Soule and Aaron Kuder.

Set in the eight month gap between the end of SECRET WARS and the ALL NEW, ALL DIFFERENT launch, Cyclops and his band of militant mutants discovered the Terrigen Mist that had been floating around the world proved fatal to mutants, including Jamie Madrox who died on Genosha when the cloud passed over. 

Death of X (2016) #1

Death of X (2016) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Enraged at the prospect of more mutant deaths, Cyclops and Emma Frost alerted the world to the danger posed by the mists and then set out to destroy both of them. It worked with one of them, but a major confrontation took place that lead to the death of Cyclops at the mouth of Black Bolt. 

Death of X (2016) #3

Death of X (2016) #3

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Well, sort of. As we learned, Cyclops actually died from exposure to the mist on Genosha and Frost used his image and her powers to make it seem like he still fought the good fight, even though he actually died very early in the series. Unfortunately, driven a bit mad by her lover’s death, Frost decided that Black Bolt actually killed Scott and demanded revenge.

All of this fed right into INHUMANS VS. X-MEN, which saw the mutants and Inhumans at peace while Hank McCoy worked on a solution to the problem with Iso by his side. As it happened, though, Beast soon realized that the cloud would burst, sending the contents all over the planet which would make it uninhabitable by most mutants. 

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016)

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016)

What is Marvel Unlimited?

While McCoy had been working on a scientific solution, Emma had been working on a more tactical one with the likes of Magneto, his team of X-Men, Storm, Dazzler, alternate reality Jean Grey and Fantomex to take out primary Inhuman targets like Black Bolt, Karnak, Lockjaw and the rest. However, they didn’t know much about the NuHumans who not only beat Old Man Logan but also destroyed Forge’s invention for saving the day.  

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016) #1

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Meanwhile, the captive Inhumans in Limbo worked together to free themselves and then move on to the school. Meanwhile, Inhuman Mosaic infiltrated the X-Men’s earthly stronghold and took over Magneto’s body. Once inside, he also got a look at all of the X-Men’s plans up to that point, including where they kept Black Bolt captive before being cast out. 

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016) #4

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016) #4

What is Marvel Unlimited?

With attacks on all sides, a major standoff took place in Limbo as Havok stood next to the chamber holding Black Bolt right in front of Medusa. Cylcops’ brother initially threatened to kill the former Inhuman king, but soon stepped aside, acknowledging that this really boiled down to a plan between Emma and Scott.

Between that and Karnak’s own escape alongside Lockjaw, the Inhumans found themselves back in the fight. However, when finally appraised of the situation regarding the cloud’s impending destruction and the adverse effects on mutants, Medusa used the Terrigen Eater to kill the cloud.

However, still driven mad by the loss of Cyclops, Emma Frost brought out a batch of Inhuman-hunting Sentinels with Magneto still backing her play, but only because of Frost’s mind manipulations. Once he realized all this, he switched sides and essentially fought alongside Medusa and Black Bolt to take Frost down.

Ultimately, they succeeded in destroying the cloud, but the relations between mutant and Inhuman may never be repaired! 

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016) #6

Inhumans vs. X-Men (2016) #6

What is Marvel Unlimited?

THE INHUMAN CONDITION

The Inhumans saw themselves facing a new world order after the events of IVX. INHUMANS PRIME set the stage for the franchise moving forward, launching into books like ROYALS, BLACK BOLT and SECRET WARRIORS. The first would find most of the Royal Family taking off into space to discover their heritage while the second found their leader somewhat unfairly imprisoned and the final featured a group fighting against Hydra-Cap’s Secret Empire!

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Matthew Rosenberg leads Quake and the Warriors down a dangerous path!

Quake has committed to going too far. And the Secret Warriors know it.

They don’t approve of her plan…but what can they do to stop it? On October 18, writer Matthew Rosenberg and artist Juanan Ramirez bring Quake face to face with her mentor’s killer as her scheme comes to a head in SECRET WARRIORS #7!

We spoke with Matthew to hear more about where Quake has been, where she may be going, and why the Warriors might just have to come along for the ride.

Marvel.com: Quake has changed in the wake of Phil Coulson’s death—describe her state of mind at the beginning of issue #7.

Matthew Rosenberg: A lot of her life has been about finding people and things she can trust—and then losing them. Coulson, Nick Fury, S.H.I.E.L.D., Captain America, various teammates…all of it adds up. Now she feels really alone.

In addition to that, she’s never quite come to terms with her powers the way other heroes have. Fury used her as a weapon before she found out about her family and her Inhuman genes without any support network.

She has this thing inside her—this incredibly destructive force that she can only barely control. And she has always had a purpose and a support network to help her focus and aim her powers, but they are all gone now. So Quake has become a weapon with no target. Just rage and fear and loneliness all simmering below the surface. She can be very dangerous and maybe even a little self-destructive at this point.

Marvel.com: How do you maintain Quake’s essential characteristics as she goes through these major changes?

Matthew Rosenberg: I feel like that’s the real challenge. We need to give readers the Quake they all love: strong, independent, smart, snarky, dangerous, cool, and a little vulnerable, while still changing that stuff.

Luckily, we’ve had a few issues to establish her and watch things go from bad to worse, but now we are really accelerating toward a brick wall. The key has been making sure the real Quake shines through in the darker moments. I try to make sure she has the funny line or doesn’t get frustrated with something dumb—just those little touches where Quake pulls people back in and doesn’t let them lose sight of the fact that Daisy still exists under all the rage and pain.

Marvel.com: How does Juanan Ramirez capture Quake’s internal and external struggles? How have you crafted those moments together?

Matthew Rosenberg: Juanan has been great. He draws Quake in such a terrifyingly badass way. I love it. She really feels like she grew up under Nick Fury. But he gives her these little moments, her acting, that are the perfect chance to see her be frustrated or upset. I think she feels really human—she has these little aspects of herself that peek out when she doesn’t want them to. And Juanan captures those remarkably well. Also, he draws a badass fight scene.

Marvel.com: Does Quake even know what she wants to do with Deadpool when she catches up to him?

Matthew Rosenberg: She has a plan, for sure. When your powers allow you to level a city, killing one dude feels like an easy task. Sure, Deadpool would be pretty hard to kill, but if you bring enough stuff down on top of him or liquefy all of his organs, he’ll hopefully get the message and die.

Marvel.com: What are the rest of the Warriors feeling about Quake and her quest?

Matthew Rosenberg: The Warriors are done with Quake. She was a loose cannon at best—and a torturer and (wannabe) assassin at her worst. But this team has never been about wanting to be together, it’s always been about needing to be together. And right now, they need Quake. And that only makes it worse. It’s one thing to have to rely on someone you don’t like. It’s quite another when they’d rather be murdering someone than helping you.

Marvel.com: Does Deadpool have an awareness of the enemy he’s made?

Matthew Rosenberg: No, he has no idea. Deadpool has a lot of enemies though and he can take a lot of damage. And he’s also real crazy. So planning for stuff isn’t as important for him as it might be for other people. But yeah, he has a whole world of pain coming his way.

Marvel.com: Regardless of whether or not Quake realizes her goals, what kind of ramifications does this journey have for the team?

Matthew Rosenberg: In a lot of ways, Quake felt like the head of the team. It’s arguable that the team had three heads at time, but she stood at the forefront. And her mission now runs counter to the rest of the team’s needs.

She is on such a personal path—such a possibly self-destructive one—that it almost feels like the only real choice either standing in her way or not. If they won’t join her or get her to quit, then the team may lose another member. And at that point, can they be called a team at all?

SECRET WARRIORS #7, by Matthew Rosenberg and artist Juanan Ramirez, drops on October 18!

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Matthew Rosenberg details a team set to fracture ahead of Marvel Legacy!

The universe trends towards entropy. Or, to put it another way, everything falls apart. Everything—including the Secret Warriors.

In the aftermath of Secret Empire, the group barely qualifies as a team anymore. And to further complicate matters, Quake—once central to the Warriors—now finds herself in a haze of rage, so focused on avenging Phil Coulson’s death that she’s lost touch with her friends and allies.

On November 15, writer Matthew Rosenberg joins artists Javier Garrón and Will Robson to unleash Mister Sinister on a team at their weakest point in SECRET WARRIORS #8!

We caught up with Matthew to see what’s next for the group as Marvel Legacy begins.

Marvel.com: Describe the Secret Warriors current team dynamic.

Matthew Rosenberg: The team as a whole finds itself in sort of a disaster. They were brought together by necessity, not by choice. They don’t really get along, they don’t see eye to eye, and they’ve been stuck with each other because they had nowhere else to go. Now the team starts falling apart after Secret Empire.

So, they aren’t really together anymore. But, as often happens with these things, bad things will bring them back together. They didn’t finish what they started last time and now it’s back for them.

Marvel.com: The team has gone through a tremendous amount of turmoil in a very short amount of time. How are the Warriors reacting?

Matthew Rosenberg: Everyone deals with the fallout of Secret Empire differently. Ms. Marvel really wants to get back to her life—to being the type of hero she feels more accustomed to being. Moon Girl wants to go home. Inferno doesn’t want to play super hero right now. Quake runs out for blood. Having lost many of the things she cared most about in the world, revenge feels like her only way of processing. While the others are exhausted and beaten down, Quake becomes something else entirely. She seems a little broken.

And Karnak…who knows anything about Karnak’s state of mind, ever? He seems like his usual creepy self.

Marvel.com: We know that Quake targeting Deadpool will be a significant storyline going forward. How does the rest of the team view that mission?

Matthew Rosenberg: Quake’s revenge won’t be something anyone feels comfortable with. She’s always been willing to cross lines the others won’t. Her choices disturb the group less since the team has gone their separate ways—but our Legacy story forces them back together, so Quake’s vendettas become an issue again. The friction between Ms. Marvel and Quake will grow even more and everyone gets caught in between.

Marvel.com: What creative benefits and challenges does this storyline present?

Matthew Rosenberg: We get to have a story that increases the stakes on a personal level. Secret Empire served as big, world changing stuff—but that kind of story can overshadow some of the smaller things at times. Now we’re telling a smaller story about loss and revenge, friendship and purpose. It can be really fun to zoom in on these characters—but it’s a big challenge too. The shifting of gears can feel jarring if you do it wrong.

Also, it was tough to borrow Deadpool. [Writer] Gerry Duggan and all the DEADPOOL team have done an amazing job of telling this really long story currently reaching its culmination in Deadpool’s fall from grace. It’s beautiful, actually. So we want to play into that and be a part of it, but not get in the way of what they’re doing in the main DEADPOOL book. We want it to feel relevant and offer something to DEADPOOL readers, but not put them at a disadvantage if they aren’t reading our book.

Marvel.com: Javier Garrón will continue as the main artist for Marvel Legacy. How do his ideas and contributions add to where the book moves next?

Matthew Rosenberg: Javier is amazing. I feel like every interview I just talk about what a joy he has been to work with, but it’s true. No matter what dumb, weird thing I throw his way, he manages to make it cool and fun. And he does it all while being one of the most pleasant people I’ve ever met.

It’s funny because he’s so amazing at two things that I think most artists struggle with. He can handle a lot on a page—big action, lots of panels, tons of characters. He never breaks stride and never makes it clumsy. That inspired us cramming so much into our first arc. We wanted to play to his strengths. And the other thing is acting. His characters have so much life and personality; I think that has been a big key to why people like this book. It’s really easy to relate to who they all are because Javier makes them such great characters before any lettering even touches the page.

Also, he gave the X-Men great facial hair. I want that recognized. Rictor’s mustache and Strong Guy’s beard are themselves some of the most important characters in comics today.

Marvel.com: Looking beyond the first arc, can you hint at what else readers can expect from SECRET WARRIORS?

Matthew Rosenberg: We are building to a showdown with Mister Sinister. He has been involved with the team for a while—only they didn’t necessarily know that. So this fight will be an interesting one.

Other than that, we have a pretty big addition coming to the roster. I am beyond excited to bring this new person to the team. It’s one of my favorite characters of all time and getting to see them interact with everyone else has been really Magikal.

Matthew Rosenberg and artists Javier Garrón and Will Robson launch SECRET WARRIORS #8 on November 15!

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Writer Matthew Rosenberg sends Quake on a quest for Deadpool’s head!

The events of Secret Empire have shot ripple effects across the Marvel Universe.

In one of the most heartbreaking casualties of the ordeal, Deadpool killed Phil Coulson on orders from an evil Captain America. The global situation may have been resolved, but Quake won’t let the loss of her mentor go without getting vengeance.

On September 13, writer Matthew Rosenberg and artist Juanan Ramirez dish out a tale of retribution with SECRET WARRIORS #6!

We caught up with Matthew to hear what we can expect from the upcoming showdown.

Marvel.com: Quake saw Coulson as her mentor—and Deadpool killed him. How does the pain of this experience impact her choices?

Matthew Rosenberg: Quake isn’t making decisions anymore. She runs on pure hatred and anger right now. Which, if you’ve ever been on a suicidal vendetta to kill your mentor’s killer before, you’ll know it’s not the best headspace to be in. But that’s the thing about Quake—she grew up with a deep destructive energy lurking inside of her. But since a young age, she’s had people who have looked out for her and helped her deal—Fury, Cap, Coulson. They’re all gone from her life now and she’s on her own. It’s not going to be pretty.

Marvel.com: The rest of the Secret Warriors don’t agree with Quake’s decision to kill Wade Wilson. How will she be able to complete her task with the whole team working against her?

Matthew Rosenberg: Quake is a spy, trained by the greatest spies the world has ever known. The Warriors are a great team—one of the bravest heroes in the world, one of the greatest strategists, one of the smartest thinkers…and Inferno. But even with all of them against Daisy Johnson, when she doesn’t want to be found, it’s still only a 50/50 chance that they’ll stop her.

Marvel.com: Deadpool’s healing factor, of course, makes him pretty tough to kill. How does Quake plan to do it?

Matthew Rosenberg: She will use anything and everything to dispose of him. Luckily for her, she has earthquakes—which can be pretty brutal.

Marvel.com: Wade doesn’t shy away from violence, and probably wouldn’t hesitate to kill Quake to defend himself. Is Quake prepared to risk her life for her vendetta?

Matthew Rosenberg: Risking her life doesn’t even come into the equation. Quake loved Coulson as a mentor and father figure. He and S.H.I.E.L.D. were the last things holding her together. And with both of those taken from her, self-preservation isn’t her concern. Quake can only see red—and she won’t stop until either she or Deadpool is in the ground.

Marvel.com: Would you like to mention anything else?

Matthew Rosenberg: Issue #6 of SECRET WARRIORS presents a brand new start for the book and the team. We’re out of Secret Empire. The team starts basically collapsing. And Quake is on the warpath. I’d urge readers, if they were at all curious about SECRET WARRIORS, to give the book a shot with this issue. It’s about to become a really crazy ride.

On September 13, writer Matthew Rosenberg and artist Juanan Ramirez launch SECRET WARRIORS #6!

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Karnak proves his worth in SECRET WARRIORS #5

With most of the Inhumans Royal Family off-planet and the Secret Warriors made up of predominantly young heroes, Karnak is an Inhuman out of place—not with his natural peer group, standing amongst the next generation of his people.

However, just because he might not fit in, does not mean he does not have a place with the Warriors. This August in SECRET WARRIORS #5 with the forces of Hydra bearing down on the team, the time has come for the Warriors to come together or perish. Writer Matthew Rosenberg took a break from the bunker to explore with us what qualities Karnak brings to the table that might recommend him.

AN EXPERIENCED TEAMMATE: “Karnak hasn’t been so much a teammate in the past as a member of the Royal family,” Rosenberg disagrees slightly. “He was a valued counsel to the king and queen, he also served at their behest and took orders. Now his role is different and some of those dynamics that he is used to with the royal family don’t quite work so well on a team.”

PRAGMATIC: “What seems pragmatic to Karnak may not be for you or I,” points out the writer. “He sees the world in a different way. He understands the flaw in all things and can see things no one else ever will. Expecting him to act sensibly by our definition is limiting. It’s like we’re playing a game of checkers and he is playing every game of chess ever played, all at once.”

DETECTING THE FLAWS IN TEAMMATES CAN LEAD TO IMPROVEMENT: “He can definitely see the flaws in all his teammates, but Karnak isn’t a life coach,” states Rosenberg. “He helps people when it is part of his plan and helps the situation. There may also be times when they’re flaws can be of use to him and he will exploit that just as much.”

DETECTING THE FLAWS IN ENEMIES CAN GIVE HIM AN ADVANTAGE: “He isn’t most powerful on the team at all, but he is probably the scariest to go up against,” the writer concurs. “Karnak’s ability to see the flaws in his enemies makes him a worthy adversary of almost anyone. And the smart villains know that and steer clear.”

TACTICIAN AND STRATEGIST: “Karnak is a brilliant tactician and planner,” agrees Rosenberng. “Often times he’s going to be following more of his own plans than anyone else’s, especially with the royal family gone. He is a bit of a missile without a target right now, a great weapon getting him to go exactly where anyone else wants might be impossible. Mostly one has to just hope your goals and Karnak’s goals align.”

A MARTIAL ARTS MASTER: “He is a person who has spent years attuning his mind and body to be the most efficient weapon against weakness,” recalls the writer. “Even if he couldn’t see every weakness of his opponents, he would be a fierce martial artist. But his physical and mental training, coupled with his ability to find and destroy other’s flaws, makes him as deadly with his hands as almost anyone on the planet.”

AN EXPERIENCED MENTOR: “He is brilliant, bold, driven, brutal, unforgiving, callous to the point of cruelty, and maybe a little psychotic,” Rosenberg explains. “To the right person he might be a good mentor. But I wouldn’t want him as mine.”

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