Elliott Kalan opens up about Arcade’s latest deathtrap!

Some super villains like to take their opponents out with simple means: a gun, a knife, maybe even a bomb. But that’s not Arcade’s style. This baddie creates Murderworlds—death-themed carnivals of carnage. And on September 6, SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #21 will see the Webslinger and the Merc with a Mouth thrown headfirst into the master assassins’ bloody circus.

So, what kind of maniacal machinations will our heroes face in this Murderworld? We sat down with writer Elliott Kalan to find out.

Marvel.com: Murderworld is one of the most terrifying concepts ever. What inspired Arcade to create it?

Elliott Kalan: Arcade has three great loves in his life: showmanship, gamesmanship, and, of course, murder. It was only natural that he’d combine those things into an enormous deathtrap amusement park, which he consistently rebuilds and reopens despite the enormous cost involved and the almost inevitable likelihood that a super hero will destroy it. As for what was going on in his mind when he came up with it…probably calliope music?

Marvel.com: What goes into creating a Murderworld? It seems like it would require a fair amount of planning in advance.

Elliott Kalan: The most fun in writing Arcade was figuring out how this version of Murderworld would work, so I have to assume that’s where the real fun of it is for him, too. If he’s anything like me, then he starts with a theme—in this case, Madripoor—and factors in the people he’s going to be trapping—in this case, Spider-Man and Deadpool—and then thinks of increasingly complicated things that can be thrown in their path. It’s an incredibly complicated way to kill someone, but Arcade enjoys the game aspect of it more than the actual killing. He wants the chance to compete with his victims, not just take them out right away. He’s like a cat toying with a mouse. A cat who has an unlimited supply of money and robots.

The real question I have is: does he build it all himself or does he hire contractors and make them sign NDAs and everything?

Marvel.com: We all know Deadpool and Spidey for their senses of humor. So in a weird way, they might have an appreciation for Murderworld, especially Wade…

Elliott Kalan: Deadpool definitely has a certain admiration for Murderworld because it combines fun and danger in a way he can really get into. Spider-Man likes his humor without the violence. Something I hope I was able to get across in this story is each character’s moral limits when it comes to the “fun” of violence. Spider-Man is a true hero—violence is only a means toward righting a wrong and humor is how he makes it palatable for himself. Deadpool gets a certain joy from violence, but he doesn’t like to see innocent people hurt and he recognizes that sometimes enough is enough. Arcade is a madman who essentially sees the world as his toy box; Spidey and Deady aren’t so cool with that.

Spider-Man/Deadpool #21 cover by Will Robson

Marvel.com: Sowhile he does enjoy it a littleWade also thinks that Murderworld casts violence in the wrong light…

Elliott Kalan: Sometimes it can be hard for Wade to remember that violence isn’t fun for other people. He can regenerate pretty much any body part and it’s nearly impossible to kill him—he can sometimes forget that isn’t the way other people live their lives. Though ever since he became a family man, he’s had a better understanding of this. The younger Deadpool would have loved the idea of a place like Murderworld—but the older, more mature Deadpool has mixed feelings toward it. It’s almost like he’s okay with violence as long as everyone involved is a responsible adult with super powers, or at the very least, is obnoxious enough that he thinks the world would be better off without them.

Marvel.com: The Murderworld’s mainframe has demonstrated sentience in the past. Will we see more of that?

Elliott Kalan: Not in this one, but we’ve got plenty of other crazy things going on in the story. Basically, you might know where page one will start—they’re trapped in Murderworld!—and where the last page will end—they escaped Murderworld!—but I guarantee you’ll never guess the stuff that happens in between.

Marvel.com: Would you like to tease anything else?

Elliott Kalan: This story also sees the introduction of a bold, exciting new character to the Marvel Universe: The Stinger! But he may not make it out of this story alive. So…I guess don’t expect to see him in any of the movies.

Dive into the murderous mayhem with SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #21, by writer Elliott Kalan and artist Todd Nauck, on September 6!

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Joe Kelly brings his bromantic run on this buddy book to a close!

Warning: This article contains spoilers for SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL

In the past, putting Spider-Man and Deadpool together has been a kind of a light, funny affair. However, their relationship evolved a lot over the course of writer Joe Kelly and artist Ed McGuinness’ tenure on SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL, turning into a kind of emotionally fraught philosophical allegory—with butt jokes.

Kelly has worked on both characters extensively throughout his career, even writing their first team-up 20 years ago! As he concludes his current run with SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #18—available now—we quizzed him on lessons learned this go around and bringing the story to a suitable close.

Marvel.com: I noticed that, in a previous interview you said that this was a dream project you couldn’t say no to. Has it lived up to that expectation?

Joe Kelly: Yeah, it definitely has. The whole team is really outstanding. Working with Ed is such a pleasure but everyone—[inker] Mark [Morales] and [colorist] Jason [Keith] and all the editors and everybody—it’s been a really, really wonderful experience. It definitely lived up to my hopes and expectations for sure. Deadpool’s the cornerstone of my career and Spider-Man has always been my favorite super hero, so it sort of felt like coming home.

Marvel.com: So, I did a little research and I found out that you and artist Pete Woods actually wrote the first instance of Spider-Man and Deadpool interacting in 1997! You guys were the ones to trail blaze that fan favorite pairing! Having worked with them before, do you have a set paradigm you stick to with Peter and Wade or did you set out to go somewhere new with them in this project?

Joe Kelly: It was definitely a combination. I mean, having done so much work with those characters and especially Deadpool, there are certain things that I feel like you almost have to do and explore. But it was really important to me to make sure I wasn’t just rehashing things that we had done before; I knew the readers wouldn’t want that. Like, it’s not 1997. I never want to go backwards, you know? But there’s so much territory to play around in with all both of those characters. Deadpool is so layered now—he’s a 20-year-old character! What was the most exciting for me, and especially worked out in the pitch, was this idea that Deadpool—despite his current popularity in the Marvel Universe—had still been a killer and Spidey just would not reconcile easily with that. [We wanted] to see how that relationship was gonna play out with the moral high ground for Spider-Man and the sort of fanboy bro crush side of Deadpool, and then to [shift] that [dynamic] over the course of the story. I’m glad I was able to go back to the well, and who [knows] what the future will hold? If enough people ask, I’m pretty weak-willed; I could be suckered into saying yes again.

Marvel.com: This series has gone into some more serious territory for both of the characters which is interesting because generally in the past when the duo have come together it’s been more light-hearted and funny. You guys dive into their relationship in a big way that we haven’t really seen before. How has it been going darker with the characters?

Joe Kelly: I think the expectation was that it was just going to be a light buddy book, and that absolutely works—there’s reasons to do that and it’s fun, and there’s no reason not to do [some of] that sort of stuff—but to get too caught up in that [would ignore the fascinating dynamic]. Deadpool’s disregard for the universe and life, etc., runs really deep whereas Spidey has this sense of [duty] to all of that same stuff and feels a literally cosmic level of responsibility and guilt so integral to his character. I feel like the universe is out to get both of them, in different ways and for different reasons. Some of that stuff they bring on themselves, which is either [because of] their poor choices or their blind spots.

Spider-Man/Deadpool #18 cover by Ed McGuinness

Marvel.com: Aside from the jokes and silliness, both of them do have pretty troubled pasts. It makes sense that they’d come together to help each other through that with their friendship…

Joe Kelly: Right, I wanted to see if that friendship could evolve and what would happen if it did. With Deadpool it’s about “Can he be the person he wants to be? Is that possible in [this] universe? Is he doomed to fail?” Especially having someone like Spider-Man at his side, that makes for a really volatile combination that you know is not going to be pretty over the course of time. It is gonna start out as fun and light, but these guys have too much going on and so to shy away from that stuff would have been a mistake. For me, that was the opportunity I got excited about. Spidey has confronted his dark side before, there’s no question, but [it’s different] to do it with Deadpool who loves him so much and wants to be him. Ultimately, there would be sacrifices made [for both of them.] When we finally get to the end of the Itsy arc, you’re definitely getting a sense of [what each will choose] when they’re really boxed in…[but] it’s always about choice.

Marvel.com: People find common ground between them because of the comedy element and the costuming, but they’re actually pretty different philosophically. I wanted to ask you how they’ve been rubbing off on each other—literally, figuratively, and even narratively?

Joe Kelly: I think that the first arc where Spidey acknowledged that they were friends was when you could see them trading off some stuff. Not the dark stuff, but Spidey being willing to cut loose in the Thor issue and live life in a little more of a goofy way, and then Deadpool really trying to step up his game—even with the Mercs for Money issue where he’s saying “What we’re doing isn’t great but the world’s more complex than that”—having those counterpoints is what you want to see as [they’re] becoming friends. But then a question that is raised is can people change?

Deadpool aspires to be [something new] because he knows that the reasons people love [him as a hero] are false. Deadpool knows that, in his heart, he’s not the greatest guy on the planet. And Spidey really is this pure soul, but he gets pushed and pushed and pushed…will he break?

If Spidey was left alone, would he have killed Itsy Bitsy? Maybe. I mean, it’s possible, if Deadpool wasn’t there. And if Spidey hadn’t gone so far down the road with Itsy Bitsy, then would Deadpool have had to make that sacrifice and take a life, which, in our universe, he hadn’t been doing for a while. So for him to have to cross that line again morally…does that mean [Wade] couldn’t really change, even if he wanted to? The answers for both of them are left sort of ambiguous.

Hopefully whoever comes on after it will run with those themes and that’s the most interesting thing about these guys. Like you said, on the surface there’s a lot of reflections. [Deadpool character creator Rob Liefeld] has openly said many times that he wanted to do “Spider-Man with guns” and that was part of the Deadpool creation. But they’re very distinct [from one another now] and you want to make sure you’re giving them their due.

Pick up SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #18 to catch the end of Joe Kelly and Ed McGuinness’ run, available now!

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Iban Coello, Salva Espin, and Scott Koblish monster mash together for a crossover event!

“If these two crazy kids can’t make it, what chance do the rest of us have?”

Okay, it seems unlikely that anyone’s thinking that about Deadpool and his wife Shiklah. In fact, they should be more concerned about all the collateral damage that will come from the huge, monster-filled “Til Death Do Us…” crossover running through DEADPOOL, SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL, and DEADPOOL & THE MERCS FOR MONEY.

Like all good crossovers, this one involves a ton of creative folks like writers Gerry Duggan, Joshua Corin, and Christopher Hastings, artists Scott Koblish, Salva Espin, and Iban Coello, and editors Jordan D. White, Heather Antos, Devin Lewis, and Allison Stock. We sat down with all three artists to see how the event will play out and which monsters and guest stars they had the most fun with!

Marvel.com: At the heart of this story is a relationship that’s falling apart between Deadpool and Shiklah. Does this add different layers to the conflict on a visual level?

Scott Koblish: Most definitely; they’ve already had a pretty challenging relationship before the events of the last few months—I’ve even helped to draw some of their ups and downs—so it’s been a really wonderful opportunity to play with some of the emotional beats. They really do love one another, it’s just that a marriage becomes more challenging when one of the partners in the relationship is trying to conquer Manhattan with a vast monster army.

Salva Espin: I think that the relationship between Deadpool and Shiklah always has been a tug of love. Well, love and passion. And in this crossover we can find some scenes talking about it. Performing this in the panels is a great challenge for an artist.

Iban Coello: The relationship between Shiklah and Deadpool makes this conflict very personal for them. I try to reflect these feelings in the way I draw these characters. It’s complicated but it’s necessary for the plot.

Marvel.com: “Til Death Do Us…” features some of the most classic Marvel monsters around. How was it paying tribute to the original designs while also putting your own spin on them?

Scott Koblish: Who can deny the pure joy of drawing Frankenstein? I can also say that drawing Jack Russell—in his current situation—was tremendous fun, and one of my favorites is Marcus, the Diabetic Symbiotic Cybernetic Werewolf Centaur; he’s a real gas.

Salva Espin: As Scott [said], I think that Frankenstein is the [funniest] to draw. Other than that I especially like to draw the Mummy. I like this classic monster with bandages very much. Mack the Knife—the mummy guy—is my favorite character in the 90’s videogame “Captain Commando.” For Dracula’s minion-vampire army I always try to draw vampires based on the classic Nosferatu.

Iban Coello: I’m drawing Dracula in my pages and I’m enjoying it a lot! He has a different look from the classic Bela Lugosi style and it’s very fun to draw him like a badass!

Marvel.com: What was the process like coming up with some of the new monsters seen in the crossover?

Scott Koblish: I relied on a lot of what [past Deadpool artists] Reilly Brown and Mike Hawthorne established as far as drawing the monsters who associate with Shiklah. I felt it was important to keep that visual through-line. Reilly’s continuous cover over the first three issues was also a great inspiration.

Salva Espin: In my case, I return to the designs of most Shiklah soldiers that I have drawn in previous issues where Deadpool had scenes at the Monster Metropolis and the [limited series] MRS. DEADPOOL AND THE HOWLING COMMANDOS.

Iban Coello: I had a list with examples of monsters I can draw in the pages, but I’m adding some Alien type monsters because I love the movies. Reilly’s cover is a great inspiration too!

Marvel.com: Being a crossover, the story brings in some other costumed characters that don’t usually appear in the regular books. Did you have a favorite you were excited to draw?

Scott Koblish: I really enjoyed drawing Gorilla-Man and Hit-Monkey. I’d thrown Hit-Monkey into a panel of Deadpool’s wedding issue, and Gorilla-Man is on that cover, but I’d always wanted to draw them some more. It was really nice to revisit Masacre again; he’s a really tall, bulky guy and it’s fun to contrast him with Domino and Negasonic Teenage Warhead. I’ve also had a lot of fun with Marvel’s current version of Dracula too.

Salva Espin: Drawing Spider-Man is always spider-great! Spidey and Deadpool are cool characters and a great team in the panels. A gift for an artist. Oh! And Ben Franklin! The scenes where this character appears are really funny!

Iban Coello: Drawing Spider-Man is like a childhood dream for me and I’m enjoying every panel where he appears!

Marvel.com: Overall, was there a lot of communication with the other artists and writers about how to present the most cohesive story possible?

Scott Koblish: Jordan, Heather, Devin and Allison have done a great job of keeping everyone in the loop. They’ve sent me the artwork from the different chapters, so everyone is on the same page. There are a lot of characters running through this adventure! It’s exciting to see Salva and Iban’s versions of the story. It certainly makes me want to work harder whenever I see how great their artwork is!

Salva Espin: Yes, in my experience I can say that I’ve always had good communication with editors and writers, especially for these kinds of crossovers, where sometimes the artists are producing the pages in parallel. In addition to this, and thanks to the Marvel gods too, Gerry Duggan’s scripts are so clear and visual that is really easy to do a cohesive story without problems.

Iban Coello: All the editors are doing a great job maintaining communication for all of us. I have a lot of pages from Scott and Salva that I use as reference when I’m lost, and they’re doing a great job!

“Til Death Do Us…” kicked off with DEADPOOL #28available now—before moving into SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #15 and then DEADPOOL & THE MERCS FOR MONEY #9!

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Gerry Duggan and Jordan White talk about blowing up Deadpool’s marriage and more!

You know the story: assassin meets Queen of the Monsters; assassin and Queen of the Monsters fall in love; Queen of the Monsters declares war on the city where assassin lives—a tale as old as time, right?

Well, perhaps not, but it has become Deadpool’s life in the crossover event Til Death Do Us Part. Spread over three books—DEADPOOL, SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL, and DEADPOOL & THE MERCS FOR MONEY—beginning in March and running into April, the storyline will test Wade Wilson’s marriage, his resolve to be a hero, and the structural integrity of Manhattan’s skyscrapers.

We caught up with DEADPOOL writer Gerry Duggan and editor Jordan White as they packed up their emergency supplies and they kindly spent some time filling us in on the blockbuster storyline.

Marvel.com: Where I want to start might be an odd place to begin considering we are talking about Deadpool, but I want to get serious for a moment. At the heart of this story is the relationship between Deadpool and Shiklah. From a writer and editor’s perspective how do you guys view their relationship? Within the story, how does each character view their relationship to the other?

Gerry Duggan: I’ll take a stab at it and Jordan you can jump in if I’m off base.

I think…look, there are days when being married is the best thing in your life and there are days when it can be work, even for the best relationships, right? For a lot of relationships. I’m happily married for coming up on 10 years and these years have been the best of my life.

The thing about Deadpool and Shiklah is that they…you have to really look at how they approach their commitments. Deadpool is a little laissez faire about commitments. Or can be on some days and then others—he’s so wonderfully consistent about being inconsistent. So, yeah, he’s not a great husband. If this were Divorce Court, I would absolutely raise my right hand and say, “Yeah, she made not a great choice,” in terms of a husband. But there are days when he was the only person she could’ve married.

Sometimes in romantic relationships logic doesn’t always dictate the decision making. There is heart and libido; they’ve burned bright but they have gone back and forth. This is not the first time they’ve fought and I think we’ve shown that when they are fighting that actually excites Shiklah. Everyone knows the sort of couple that loves to fight and this is the couple that loves to fight.

Jordan White: It’s important to remember that Shiklah literally married the first man that she met after hundreds of years left in a coffin. Now it turns out she really liked him. Again, if they had just met and started dating, it would’ve been wonderfully pleasant. Instead, they got married immediately to thwart an evil plan of Dracula’s. As most people who get married do. [Laughs] They got married for that reason and, you know, it’s good to thwart Dracula but it’s not necessarily the foundation of the most solid relationship in the world.

Now does that mean that they can’t be good together? No, they’ve had some great times. But it definitely means that…when Deadpool married her, he had no idea what he was in for and when Shiklah married him, she had no idea what she was in for. They had experienced each other, living on the road together and having adventures, but that isn’t what their life is.

I think Deadpool had no idea she was an actual serious queen with responsibilities.

Gerry Duggan: And that is very much at the heart of it. And the other thing is Deadpool kind of oversold himself. He arrived and said, “Don’t worry. I rule this place. I rule this world.” And she thought that was all very charming, “I’ve met the king of Earth.” He had to walk it back, “No, no. I meant culturally. I’m popular.”

If there was a quickie marriage lemon law, she’d have a case to get her money back.

Jordan White: When they got married, he had spent days and days with her, spending all attention to her, which is what a lot of early relationships are like. But at this point, he’s really more concerned with being an Avenger. Or taking care of the daughter he didn’t know they had when he got married. Or all sort of different things that keep coming up.

And she’s like, “Umm, I’m the Queen of this world, why are you not being here as my consort?”

Marvel.com: It’s Shiklah’s role as a queen where the inciting event of this storyline springs from. Much like Namor stories of old, man has overreached and insulted another kingdom and the ruler feels as though he or she has no choice but to strike back in retaliation. Obviously without spoiling things, can you give a tease as to why Shiklah has felt so offended by the surface world that she feels the need to declare war on Manhattan?

Gerry Duggan: There’s an inciting incident in the first chapter; Deadpool has been up and down with Shiklah for a long time now and what really starts the story off is about humans and monsters, no surprise, not being the best of neighbors. Shiklah has responsibilities as the monarch of the monster metropolis and that brings her into conflict with the surface world.

And then, because she is Mrs. Deadpool in some circles, that immediately drags her husband into it.

Marvel.com: And for the first time, perhaps, Deadpool has some big responsibilities and goals of his own, but also this largely ideal he’s chasing after, to become a hero. What is it like, internally, for Deadpool to be placed in this position where he’s caught between his love for her, his commitment to her, and these new goals he’s begun to pursue?

Gerry Duggan: I think he’s a guy who’s compromised by all these selections. Now there’s been a development recently, in the most recent issues of DEAPOOL, that will further complicate his life and decision making. For a long time now, he was anointed a replacement for Logan on the Unity Squad by Steve Rogers. In Deadpool, I think Steve Rogers saw someone who was at his best when he was receiving orders and was acting the good soldier. He focused a lot of that Deadpool energy to good effect in the pages of UNCANNY AVENGERS.

Now a lot of these things are fraying.

It would be incompatible to have a wife who is waging a war on Manhattan and an Avengers ID card and he knows he’s got to tie this one off.

Marvel.com: To broaden the focus a bit, this storyline will also feature Spider-Man and the Mercs for Money. How do they specifically end up getting pulled into this mess, as opposed to any number of other New York based heroes?

Gerry Duggan: Deadpool has their phone numbers, which is a huge bummer. We actually have a gag of Deadpool reaching out and ringing for help. Not everyone answers the call, but…

I should say Parker Industries, too, has a specific plot point that would’ve brought in Parker regardless of his connection to Deadpool.

Deadpool: Til Death Do Us Part by Reilly Brown

Deadpool: Til Death Do Us Part by Reilly Brown

Jordan White: Also, Shiklah is definitely making a bit of a ruckus and that attracts people’s attention.

They are people he has a pretty close relationship with. In SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL, him and Spidey have actually—well Deadpool has always liked Spidey a lot, but Spidey is almost starting close to respecting him which is interesting.

Then over in MERCS while they don’t all necessarily respect him, they do work with him on the regular. So they are definitely all people he can count on. Although, like Gerry said, there are some other people he was thinking he can count on that he can apparently count on a little less.

Marvel.com: How is it to write with Joshua [Corin] and Christopher [Hastings]? What has the process been like, to collaborate together on this project, to craft this storyline?

Gerry Duggan: It’s always fun to write comedy in a group and these are guys who are very funny.

But they are also writing very serious character stuff too so they’re wonderful additions to this team. As are the artists who are doing tremendous work. And Reilly [Brown] who originated Shiklah is doing amazing work on the covers. Tremendous, tremendous work.

I’ve always been very lucky on collaborators for DEADPOOL and that’s true again here. I always liked being surprised and having ideas thrown out there that I wouldn’t have had to make the story better and we’re really very lucky to have that again, coming from every direction.

Marvel.com: With the artists—Scott Koblish, Salva Espin, and Iban Coello—are they all paired with a specific writer, on a specific book, or is this some rotating around?

Jordan White: The creative teams stay on each book. So Gerry is working with Salva Espin on DEADPOOL, Joshua Corin is writing the SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL issues with artist Scott Koblish—Josh did the recent DEADPOOL: TOO SOON? series as well as the Monsters Unleashed issue of SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL—and then [for the] MERCS FOR MONEY issues we turned to Christopher Hastings who’s been writing GWENPOOL for us and taking over from Cullen Bunn for these, but it is the regular artist Iban Coello who’s sticking with us.

Gerry Duggan: GWENPOOL is so fun that it has been really neat to have [Christopher] onboard for this.

Jordan White: I love that book.

Gerry Duggan: Yeah, it’s great. A lot of fun.

Marvel.com: Have you gotten to see any of the art coming down besides Reilly’s covers?

Gerry Duggan: Yeah. It’s really amazing work.

Jordan White: It’s really really good so far.

Marvel.com: You mentioned the balance between Deadpool as a typically humorous character—that’s a trait that’s very important to his stories—and serious character work. From a writing standpoint—and an editing standpoint—how do you find that proper balance?

Gerry Duggan: Sometimes the jokes present themselves early, sometimes the jokes aren’t there until you are doing the lettering polishing pass and sometimes the jokes don’t show up at all, they just take the day off.

All these stories are about characters being portrayed as real people. Even though Shiklah is a demon and Deadpool is a superstar unkillable mercenary, I feel like their story, their relationship has a real feel to it. They have highs, they have lows. They love each other, they fight like hell against each other. It is Sid and Nancy-esque but it helps ground it. The gags sort of take care of themselves if you write a real story about real emotions, in my estimation.

Jordan White: I think Gerry’s been very good at that for his entire run, writing very funny stories that always have a real emotional base, a real—the ability to punch you in the gut. Like…one of the big ones was the issue when Deadpool was trying to find his daughter and the woman who gave birth to his daughter and he finds the woman’s dead body. He makes a few jokes but then it gets so serious and so upsetting and real. It was an amazing impressive issue and I feel like he’s pulled that off a number of times throughout the series and it’s always really great.

Yeah. Gerry, you’re good. [Laughs]

Marvel.com: What do you want to make sure the reader knows so they put this on their pull list because they are not going to want to miss it?

Gerry Duggan: Hmm…hmm…hmm.

I think if you are a Deadpool fan or a Shiklah fan or a fan of both, I think you are going to want to see these two characters who love each other very much but are opposing each other. I think you are going to see a story with real emotion and a lot of guest stars. We’re in the entertainment business and we have to entertain even when bad things are happening to good characters and I think we are accomplishing that here.

Shiklah’s arrival in the Marvel Universe felt a lot like—you know, downhill, out of control, no breaks. I think we’re capturing that again. This isn’t the death of Deadpool or the death of Shiklah, this is a new road for their relationship to explore. Even though not great things are happening to their marriage, I think they are great things for these characters and a lot of fun for the fans.

Jordan White: This is just the beginning of the Deadpool’s suffering.

Gerry Duggan: Those are the words Jordan has in stone outside his office, actually.

Til Death Do Us Part takes over Deadpool’s life and his books beginning in March!

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Marvel's wisecracking super heroes join forces with art by Ed McGuinness!

Two great tastes that taste great together! Now starring together in their own ongoing series! Marvel is pleased to present  SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #1 – wallcrawling, wisecracking, and bad guy stabbing into your hearts this January!

Joe Kelly and Ed McGuinness are reuniting once more to chronicle the ongoing adventures of Peter Parker and Wade Wilson! Deadpool LOVES Spider-Man. Spider-Man HATES Deadpool. What could go wrong? More importantly, what on Earth could bring these two together for a titanic team-up in the mighty Marvel manner? Find out this January as the World’s Greatest Super Hero and the star of the World’s Greatest Comic Magazine collide in SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #1!

SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL #1 (NOV150751)
Written by JOE KELLY
Art & Cover by ED MCGUINNESS
Variant Cover by MIKE DEL MUNDO (NOV150755)
Action Figure Variant by JOHN TYLER CHRISTOPHER (NOV150753)
Hip-Hop Variant by DAVE JOHNSON (NOV150752)
Action Figure Photo Variant Also Available (NOV150756)
Deadpool Variant by WILL SLINEY (NOV150754)
On-Sale 01/06/16

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Joe Kelly reunites with Ed McGuinness to team-up two of Marvel's wittiest warriors on a regular basis!

What do you get when you combine two of the biggest jokesters in the Marvel Universe in one book? We’ll all get to find out later this year when SPIDER-MAN/DEADPOOL launches from Joe Kelly and Ed McGuinness.

Kelly and McGuinness famously teamed up on the beloved DEADPOOL series of the late 90’s that cemented the Merc with a Mouth’s unique place in the Marvel Universe, one that revolves around plenty of fourth wall breaking and more quips than a speed reader can process.

Now part of Man of Action, Kelly helps chronicle the adventures of the Wallcrawler on “Marvel’s Ultimate Spider-Man” on Disney XD, so this new ongoing series provides a synthesis of old and new interests. 

“It’s been an idea that folks have flirted with for a while,” Kelly says. “When [editor] Nick [Lowe] approached me, he said, ‘I’m going to pitch you a project you can’t say no to.’ I was skeptical, I say no all the time. Then he said the magic combination of words: Spidey, Deadpool, and Ed McGuinness. Turns out he was right! Two of my all-time favorite Marvel heroes who are funny as hell and have a habit of screwing up royally? I was born for this…and blackmail. And, he has photos…the sort one doesn’t want made public. He’s a great editor. Really. My dream project.”

Even without the blackmail, Kelly relishes the chance to work with McGuinness again.

“It’s amazing, honestly,” he says. “I love Ed as a person and an artist. Getting the chance to work with him was a major draw for me. He’s one of those guys who is so into what he’s drawing, that energy is infectious. And I saved his life once. I don’t want to brag, but he totally owes me. How else could I steal him away?”

Though cryptic in his response, Kelly does reveal a piece of the puzzle that brings these two characters together:

“I can say that they come for the Deadpool but stay for the Spidey—or I can tell you the truth: I can’t tell you that. I will say that there is an assassination involved, a case of misplaced trust and their names are on the book so they sort of have to show up.”

While these two characters might both love a good one-liner, they tend to have very different ways of dealing with criminals, something that Kelly says will keep the two from becoming besties.

“Spidey learns to stab more,” he jokes. “It’s really touching, like a father teaching his kid to play catch, but with daggers.

“This is obviously a huge source of tension between them, but Deadpool has been trading on some of the Ultra-Violence for more noble badassery lately, so they may find common ground… though there will be lots of stabbing and punching to go around.”

When two super heroes get together other heroes and villains usually don’t stay far away. Readers will most likely see some familiar faces, but Kelly’s not letting slip who just yet.

“Aside from an editor who uses blackmail to get you to work and then brings in the other editor Jordan White to put the screws to you and keep you in line?” the writer asks. “No one else. Wait, I’ve been informed that the above statement is false, and that what I meant is that we’ll see lots of sinister villains from both Spidey’s and Deadpool’s [worlds], none of whom I will base on people we know.”

With these two characters hanging out in one book together, the laughs will fly fast and furious to the point where a single comic page might not be able to hold them all.

“Which is why each issue is printed in three point type and sold with a magnifying glass for the full comedy experience,” Kelly quips. “Seriously, I’m having a blast writing the banter. It’s your favorite buddy-cop movie on steroids if it was written by a swill-minded teenager. Guaranteed to make you laugh or Nick will give you your money—

“I have been informed by Mr. White that the book is funny. Period.”

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