Get the exclusive NOT BRAND ECHH creative team announcement from Heather Antos!

True Believers, level up your weekend with a brand new episode of This Week in Marvel, the official Marvel podcast!

Catch up on all the latest comics news and info as Ben, Tucker and Maggie give you the rundown on all of this week’s new comics releases including AVENGERS, AMERICA, SPIDER-MAN, X-MEN, and more! Not one to rest on his laurels, Ben talks to editors Jordan D. White and Heather Antos about creative changes to the STAR WARS book, and gets the exclusive announcement on the NOT BRAND ECHH creative teams from Heather (55:25)!

Exclusive announcement on NOT BRAND ECHH creative teams, you say? Here’s the scoop:

  • SECRET EMPIRE ABRIDGED – Written by Nick Spencer and Inks by Scott Koblish
  • FORBUSH MAN RETURNS – Written/Art by Jay Fosgitt
  • GWENPOOL ABSORBS THE MARVEL UNIVERSE – Written by Christopher Hastings and Art by Gurihiru

Over on the West Coast, Christine and Eric have everything you need to know about TV, Films, Games and Themed Entertainment (1:19:35). And from there, it’s back to the east coast for your questions and comments (1:38:55)!

Download episode #308 of This Week in Marvel from Marvel.com, check out Marvel Podcast Centralgrab the TWiM RSS feed and subscribe to This Week in Marvel on iTunes, so you never miss an episode! We are now also on Soundcloud! Head over now to our new hub to listen to the full run of This Week in Marvel!

This Week in Marvel will focus on delivering all the Marvel info on news and new releases–from comics to video games to toys to TV to film and beyond! New episodes will be released every Thursday (or so) and TWiM is co-hosted by Marvel VP & Executive Editor of Digital Media Ryan “Agent M” Penagos and Marvel Editorial Director of Digital Media Ben Morse, along with Marvel.com Editor Marc Strom, Marvel.com Assistant Editor Christine Dinh, and Manager of Video & Content Production Blake Garris. We also want your feedback, as well as questions for us to answer on future episodes!  Tweet your questions, comments and thoughts about TWiM to @AgentM@BenJMorse@chrissypedia or @Marvel with the hashtag #ThisWeekinMarvel!

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Anthony Daniels co-writes C-3PO's 1997 adventure!

Each week Star Wars Spotlight combs through the digital archives of Marvel Unlimited to showcase one classic story from that distant galaxy filled with Jedi, Sith, princesses, scoundrels and droids.

Many say that the best way to write a character is to really get inside of them and figure out what makes them tick. So, who better to work on a story focusing on everyone’s favorite protocol droid, C-3PO, than his big screen portrayer Anthony Daniels?! He, Ryder Windham and Brian Daley wrote a one-shot called STAR WARS DROIDS: THE PROTOCOL OFFENSIVE with art by Igor Kordey that debuted in 1997. 

Star Wars: Droids - The Protocol Offensive (1997) #1

Star Wars: Droids - The Protocol Offensive (1997) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?

Set a few years before the events of “A New Hope,” this tale starred Threepio and his longtime pal R2-D2 during a time when they represented the Tion Hegemony in their efforts to set up a trade route with Tahlboor, home to the warring Hobors and Troobs. Said negotiations took place on a space station hovering above the planet.

The two droids proved themselves to their new owners after Artoo fixed his boss’s datapad and Threepio revealed that the existing interpreter had not been strictly truthful. After everyone agreed to allow ol’ Goldenrod to act as translator, they took a recess which gave readers a look at the extensive ship, including its huge bar and casino.

Once there, General Krax of the Troobs attempted to buy Threepio, a request that Tion representative Jake Harthan denied. However, Madam Krax won the droid in a game of Sabacc played against Harthan’s father! This move lead to even more mistrust on the side of the Hobors whose Chief Nimondro saw this exchange of property as potentially detrimental to the process of making a fair deal. 

To prove their power, the head of the Hobors said the planet spoke through him and then called up a huge beam of light that shot out from a mountain and nearly blinded everyone on the ship floating in orbit. Having demonstrated his powers, Nimondro then demanded that they reconvene the talks on planet and also desired to purchase Artoo because he’d help them win at space slots!

That night, the two groups went to war after it seemed like Nimondro’s daughter Larka killed Krax’s son. Worse yet for Threepio? It sure looked like Artoo helped facilitate the young woman’s escape!

As Jake and Threepio tried to figure out the best way to get off planet and avoid this war, Artoo tried keeping the supposed murderess alive in a cave with a monster. After receiving the coordinates from his partner, Threepio stole a speeder bike of sorts and took off to save his friend! From there, Threepio learned some very interesting truths about the Hobors, including the secret behind their supposed power. Nimondro also learned something, that his daughter loved the Krax boy and would never harm him. 

In an attempt to stop the impending war, Threepio made a transmission to everyone explaining that Larka had not killed her lover, but instead it had been committed by Jake Harthan himself so he could use the weapon hidden in the mountain to take over his own planet.

In the morning, with Jake no longer a threat, the two groups started making inroads to peace, but Larka planned to leave the planet with her new droid friends.

From the Jedi Temple Archives

STAR WARS DROIDS: THE PROTOCOL OFFENSIVE marked the one and only time Anthony Daniels wrote a Star Wars comic, so far. As Ryder Windham noted in the book’s Afterword, he came into contact with the actor while working on various DROIDS projects. He also came to know Brian Daley who had not only written the Star Wars radio adaptations, but also Han Solo-starring novels. He worked with Windham to come up with the story which Daniels also had input in. The idea would be for Daley to write the script with Artoo’s words and then Daniels would fill out Threepio’s lines. Daley wrote up a rough outline, but then had to work on the radion version of “Return of the Jedi,” which he completed just before passing away in 1996. Windham eventually came back to the Star Wars fold to help finish the story which came out in 1997.

Before “A New Hope,” Princess Leia goes undercover as seen in the second arc of STAR WARS: EMPIRE.

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Writer Kelly Thompson charts a path to “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”!

In 2015, the world witnessed the debut of a ruthless captain in a shining suit of armor. And while she gleamed in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” her story reaches new heights in JOURNEY TO STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI – CAPTAIN PHASMA.

Captain Phasma takes her destiny into her own hands, emerging from the embers of “The Force Awakens” to set herself on a new path ahead of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” On October 18, writer Kelly Thompson and artist Marco Checchetto bring the epic limited series to its conclusion with issue #4!

We spoke with Kelly to hear more about the Captain’s tale of resurgence and revenge.

Marvel.com: Before you got this gig, what’d you think of Phasma after seeing her in “The Force Awakens”?

Kelly Thompson: That the armor looked absolutely incredible and that actress Gwendoline Christie projects a force to be reckoned with in every scene she’s in. Even completely covered up, she manages so much charisma—you can’t take your eyes off of her! I wanted to know so much more about her character. And I never dreamed I’d get to be a writer that helped decide those things. Total dream come true.

Marvel.com: Describe your process for fleshing the character out. Where did you focus first?

Kelly Thompson: Well, I coordinated pretty heavily with the Lucasfilm Story Group because everything connects both between the two films—since our story basically links those films together—and also with the new Phasma prose novel. So there were some parameters and directives about who she could be in those opening discussions; when those directives came through, Phasma clicked almost instantly into place in my head. Her character and her motivations made so much sense and the story began to form very organically from there.

Who she is, what she wants, what she will do to survive—it all began to dictate our story in a really clear way.

Marvel.com: How much of Phasma’s appearance—her armor, specifically—informs your writing of the character?

Kelly Thompson: More than you’d think. It comes down to Marco Checchetto and Andres Mossa—our incredible artist and colorist, respectively—in creating that visual. Since we knew we were dealing with a character in full body armor—so no facial expressions and limited body language—and we weren’t going to be inside her head via narrative captions, we really had to be smart about every single thing we did. Phasma can be such an efficient and brutal machine, so we made sure that everything she did linked up with that idea. Fortunately, I had incredible partners in Marco and Andres for that mission.

Marvel.com: In the story, how would you define the common First Order opinion of Phasma? Does anything like that affect her?

Kelly Thompson: I think people are terrified of her and many of them don’t even know why. She’s a mystery—and she’s powerful and she’s unlike most other people—in that she presents no “human side,” no flaws, no obvious weaknesses. Everything Phasma does has been completely calculated. Even the lowering of the shields in “The Force Awakens”—in that moment her goal is simply to “not get shot,” and to do that, she lowers the shields. How she then deals with the ramifications of that decision can only be answered after she’s not shot—and thus not dead.

I don’t think Phasma cares at all what others think of her—unless it will either advance her or hold her back. She is unapologetically who she is, and she’s a chameleon that will do anything to survive. That currently means being the perfect soldier—the perfect leader for the First Order—and so she executes that directive as flawlessly as possible…with her eye always on what’s next.

Marvel.com: What’s Phasma’s general opinion of her enemies?

Kelly Thompson: One hundred percent, Phasma has a list in her head of every person she’s ever met, what their weaknesses and strengths are, and strategies for getting rid of them should that be necessary or amenable to her advancement. Phasma does not rest or take it easy. She’s always on, always ready.

Marvel.com: Last question—if you were able to meet Captain Phasma face to face, what would you say to her?

Kelly Thompson: I mean, I think I would just run. Yeah. As fast and as far as humanly possible. Someone that ruthless in their intent to survive…I’ve got no chance. None!

JOURNEY TO STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI – CAPTAIN PHASMA #4, by Kelly Thompson and artist Marco Checchetto, drops on October 18!

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Boba Fett discovers a relative he never expected in STAR WARS: BLOOD TIES!

Each week Star Wars Spotlight combs through the digital archives of Marvel Unlimited to showcase one classic story from that distant galaxy filled with Jedi, Sith, princesses, scoundrels and droids.

If there’s one thing we know about the Star Wars Universe, it’s that familial relationships can be complicated. The Skywalkers alone could offer a counselor enough material to fill a series of books, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Take Jango Fett for instance. As we learned in the Prequels, he made a deal with the Republic so they could use his DNA to make their Clone Army. Part of that exchange involved him getting one whose growth hadn’t been accelerated, so he could have a son, Boba.

In the 2010 four issue limited series STAR WARS: BLOOD TIES by Tom Taylor and Chris Scalf, it became clear that this decision came with more complications than most would have assumed.

The series started off with Jango taking a mission to knock off a masked individual for Count Dooku. He took Boba along with him and had the boy help with the mission, but Jango went in for the kill himself. When he did, he realized that his target was one of his own clones! Jango killed him without much thought, but still decided to secretly send the clone’s son, Connor Freeman, money. 

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #1

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #1

  • Published: August 25, 2010
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: May 07, 2015
  • Writer: Tom Taylor
  • Cover Artist: Chris Scalf
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Years later though, the secret came out when Gilean hired Boba Fett to grab Connor for a nasty crime lord named Tayand who Freeman owed money to. Fett showed up just in time to save Connor from a group calling themselves the League of Bountyhunters, but the ensuing battle failed to kill a few of his competitors. 

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #2

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #2

  • Published: September 29, 2010
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: May 07, 2015
  • Writer: Tom Taylor
  • Cover Artist: Chris Scalf
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Connor and Boba had some time to talk and try to figure out why Jango sent Connor money, but the family reunion came to a crashing halt when the remaining Leaguers blasted them with their ship, grabbed Connor and seemingly killed Boba.

Of course, Boba Fett’s way harder to kill than that, just ask the Sarlacc. The infamous bounty hunter followed Connor’s captors to the ice planet Cilare, where Tayand kept his headquarters. Fett literally swooped in to save Connor from the Leaguers, but only to claim the bounty himself, even after Freeman explained that the whole thing was really a mistake.  

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #3

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #3

  • Published: October 27, 2010
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: May 07, 2015
  • Writer: Tom Taylor
  • Cover Artist: Chris Scalf
What is Marvel Unlimited?

To everyone’s surprised, after getting the bounty for Connor, Boba offered to clear his debt to Tayand, but the crime lord wanted blood instead. The surprises continued after this negotiation failed when Connor offered Fett three credits as a bounty to take out Tayand and he accepted!

Fett quickly made good on the bounty, and then ran out of there with Connor and the help of an enraged Rancor. With all their enemies out of the picture and Connor’s bounty to Boba paid, they both took what they wanted and went their separate ways without truly knowing their connection to one another. 

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #4

Star Wars: Blood Ties (2010) #4

  • Published: November 24, 2010
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: May 07, 2015
  • Writer: Tom Taylor
  • Cover Artist: Chris Scalf
What is Marvel Unlimited?

FROM THE JEDI TEMPLE ARCHIVES

If you’ve ever wondered what made Boba Fett such a renowned figure in the Star Wars Universe, BLOOD TIES goes a long way in showing just a few of the reasons. First off, his dad trained him from a young age to follow in the family business. In fact, the series started off with Jango spraying Boba with the scent of a giant monster’s main prey. Leaving the boy with a jet pack, he commanded him to bring back one of the monsters’ teeth. When Boba succeeded, Jango explained that he did all this so that the boy would know that he’s already faced the scariest thing in the universe and survived, so everything else should pale in comparison.

Next week, C-3PO gets in on the action with STAR WARS: DROIDS – THE PROTOCOL OFFENSIVE, co-written by Anthony Daniels!

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The First Order’s stoic trooper predictably refuses to open up.

Captain Phasma is an adult woman whose health records indicate she is of above average physical health, although she has a history of injuries, mostly gained during combat or training for combat, dating back to her teens.

The client acted, until recently, as the third ranked officer on the Starkiller base behind General Armitage Hux and special advisor Kylo Ren. In her position as Captain, she has acted as the head trainer for the Stormtroopers corps, with a special emphasis on developing the talents of those who were expected to be the most elite and least conflicted of the brigades.

Unfortunately, however, the client has been officially recorded as having encountered a series of setbacks. To summarize quickly, one of the troopers under her direct command “broke” during a mission. When she sent him for reconditioning, he instead helped a key prisoner—the Resistance pilot Poe Dameron, believed to have knowledge of where the so-called Jedi Luke Skywalker could be found—escape the base. She has reported that this is the trooper that later returned with the criminal known as Han Solo and his partner Chewbacca to free an unidentified female prisoner of high interest. This group took her hostage briefly, forced her to turn over secrets at gunpoint, and then sent her down a garbage shaft. It is also believed that this group helped render the Starkiller Base vulnerable to attack and therefore led to its destruction.

Journey to Star Wars: The Last Jedi - Captain Phasma (2017) #1

Journey to Star Wars: The Last Jedi - Captain Phasma (2017) #1

Despite these setbacks, the client remained generally disinterested and rejecting of therapy. For most of session, she even refused to remove her helmet, eventually acquiescing upon this writer’s 15th request, although her reasoning remains unclear. There is a certain temptation to label her as hostile towards therapy but the fact is she was so even and unemotional in most of her reactions that even this would be inaccurate.

Given my struggles with connecting with the client, it is clear this is not a helpful therapeutic situation for her. In an attempt to find a better fit for the client and, hopefully, bring about a more productive therapeutic bond for her, Captain Phasma has been referred to specific First Order therapists, Doctors Kelly Thompson and Marco Checchetto.

The client will first meet with them on September 6, followed by appointments on September 20 and October 4. Detailed assessment notes will be available in files Journey to Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Captain Phasma.

Star Wars Tim Stevens believes everyone has a right to therapy. Even First Order Captains.

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Jason Aaron and Leinil Yu pit Leia and some unlikely allies against a jailbreak!

Each week Star Wars Spotlight combs through the digital archives of Marvel Unlimited to showcase one classic story from that distant galaxy filled with Jedi, Sith, princesses, scoundrels and droids.

When last we left the Jason Aaron-penned STAR WARS series, it had crossed over with DARTH VADER in a story called VADER DOWN that left his right hand woman Dr. Aphra in the hands of the enemy.

In STAR WARS #1619 – drawn by Leinil Yu – Leia Organa took Aphra to a top secret Rebel prison called Sunspot because of its closeness to a star. Accompanied by Sana Starros, Leia found herself constantly explaining why they didn’t just kill all of their enemies when a mysterious masked sentient staged a riot on the prison! 

Star Wars (2015) #16

Star Wars (2015) #16

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Meanwhile, Han continued getting Luke and himself in trouble as he failed to correctly cheat while playing Sabacc and lost all of the Rebellion’s supply money in the process. This lead them to a smuggling job revolving around herding Nerfs before they heard Leia’s distress call and made way for Sunspot.

Back at the prison itself, the masked attacker unleashed some of the worst criminals in the galaxy to see whether Leia would kill them or not. Realizing they needed more help, Leia freed Dr. Aphra to back her and Sana, which also revealed that the two women had a history together that didn’t end well.

Han and Luke eventually showed up to help, but got captured almost immediately. Finally standing in front of Leia, Sana and Aphra, the masked man revealed himself as Eneb Ray, a spy first seen in STAR WARS ANNUAL #1 (see below). 

Star Wars Annual (2015) #1

Star Wars Annual (2015) #1

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Thanks to some planning with Artoo, Leia used an Ion Pulse to incapacitate Eneb as well as the whole prison itself. As the station started falling towards the sun, Ray raged, wondering if Leia truly had what it would take to make the hard decisions, the kind that would swiftly topple the Empire and pave way for a new world.

Leia proved her strength as a leader by correctly evaluating the situation and developing a plan that resulted in the least amount of loss. She also allowed Dr. Aphra to escape, which would not sit well with Ray who now counted himself among the Rebel’s prisoners, but with a key-looking shape up his sleeve, or more accurately, in his tooth.

From the Jedi Temple Archives

For the full story on what happened to former Rebel spy Eneb Ray, check out STAR WARS ANNUAL #1 by Kieron Gillen and Angel Unzueta. Deep undercover on Coruscant as Tharius Demo, Ray got new orders from Leia when a group of anti-Imperial senators came up for execution. After breaking into the prison and finding the politicians, he heard that the Emperor himself would see them before their murders. He came up with a quick plan involving other Coruscant spies to finally kill Palpatine, but the effort proved fruitless as the former senator showed his own immense power, shocking Ray with Force Lightning in the process, which presumably gave him the look he sported in Rebel Jail.

Come back next week for STAR WARS: BLOOD TIES, a father and son story about Boba and Jango Fett!

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Luke, Leia, Lando, Chewie and the droids deal with a post "Empire" galaxy.

Each week Star Wars Spotlight combs through the digital archives of Marvel Unlimited to showcase one classic story from that distant galaxy filled with Jedi, Sith, princesses, scoundrels and droids.

Last time we visited the original run of STAR WARS from Marvel Comics, the issues chronicled the adventures seen on the big screen in “The Empire Strikes Back.” That film, of course, ended with Han Solo kidnapped in Carbonite and Vader telling Luke about his parentage.

Fans would have to wait until 1983’s “Return of the Jedi” to find out what happened to all of their favorite characters…unless they read the Marvel series! Now part of the Legends continuity, STAR WARS #4548 showed some harrowing adventures featuring Luke Skywalker testing his new hand in space, Lando Calrissian and Chewbacca in the Millennium Falcon, C-3PO and R2-D2 on Droid World and Princess Leia facing off against Darth Vader on a banking planet.

In the first issue, Archie Goodwin and Carmine Infantino shined the spotlight on Luke as he flew in his X-Wing fighter for the first time after getting a robotic replacement hand. Perhaps that explained his slow reflexes and the destruction of his transport. Thanks to some clever thinking and use of the Force, he and Artoo made their way to an Imperial ship that housed a rampaging Probe Droid. Ultimately, though, our heroes walked away with both their skins and a win as they blew up the Imperial ship and made off with another X-Wing.  

Star Wars (1977) #45

Star Wars (1977) #45

  • Published: December 23, 1980
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 15, 2015
  • Rating: All Ages
  • Writer: Archie Goodwin
  • Cover Artist: Larry Hama
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Lando and Chewie took center stage in STAR WARS #46 by Wally Lombego and Infantino as they flew the Falcon in an effort to find their good buddy Han. Instead, they stumbled upon a legendary Rebel fighter named Cody Sunn-Childe who had turned away from violence upon gaining an immense amount of power that allowed him to essentially create his own pocket of reality. However, with the Empire always looking for more worlds to conquer, they soon appeared on Sunn-Childe’s metaphorical doorstep and brought the war to him. 

Star Wars (1977) #46

Star Wars (1977) #46

  • Published: January 20, 1981
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 15, 2015
  • Rating: All Ages
  • Writer: J. M. DeMatteis
  • Cover Artist: Ed Hannigan
What is Marvel Unlimited?

From there, Goodwin and Infantino sent Artoo and Threepio to another world intent on staying out of the fracas between the Empire and Rebellion: Droid World. Their mission revolved around getting schematics for the Empire’s Warbot, but they stumbled upon a robo revolution in the works. After the war came to a close, Droid World overseer Kligson turned the whole place into a rocket and took off for deeper space to move even further away from the Empire’s reach. 

Star Wars (1977) #47

Star Wars (1977) #47

  • Published: February 24, 1981
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 15, 2015
  • Rating: All Ages
  • Writer: Archie Goodwin
  • Cover Artist: Frank Miller
What is Marvel Unlimited?

Finally, in STAR WARS #48, Larry Hama and Infantino saw Leia visit the banking planet of Aargau to strike a deal to get funding for more X-Wings. To everyone’s surprise, Darth Vader also happened to be on planet as well. Using a series of schemes that still follow the rules of the planet, he tries to kill her and Viscount Tardi while she defends them all using her cunning. The pair even face off against each other with Vader wielding his lightsaber and Leia, a blaster. That ended with a draw, each one going their separate ways, not fully succeeding in their plans, but also not fully failing.  

Star Wars (1977) #48

Star Wars (1977) #48

  • Published: March 24, 1981
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 15, 2015
  • Rating: All Ages
  • Writer: Larry Hama
  • Cover Artist: Carmine Infantino
What is Marvel Unlimited?

From the Jedi Temple Archives

Let’s talk about some of the legendary creators involved in these few issues. Goodwin and Infantino racked up impressive runs and takes on these characters. You might notice another famous name in this batch if you look at the cover to #47, which a guy named Frank Miller composed (as well as #43 from the previous arc). Fellow legend Larry Hama also got in on the action by drawing the cover to #45 and writing #48. You might also wonder about the writer of #46, a fella named Wally Lombego. That’s actually J.M. DeMatteis, who took his real name off the project after interior changes altered his vision for the story’s main message of pacifism.

Our heroes plan a jail break in STAR WARS #1519 by Jason Aaron, Kieron Gillen, Leinil Yu and the gang!

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Windu tries to prepare himself and his fellow Jedi for battle.

Mace Windu is an adult human male who appears to be in above average physical health, a perception confirmed by his medical records. Despite his files reflecting an age that is slightly advanced for his species, there is no record of any age related reduction in physical ability. Additionally, the client reports feeling healthy and has no complaints related to pain. Scans seem to confirm these self-reports.

Windu made the decision to consult with this writer on the eve of undertaking what he would only refer to as “a mission” during the course of our session. I was able to gather that involved leading a small group of Jedi and that it may involve violence but nothing more. However, this therapist does feel this context was enough to explore the situation with the client in a full and useful manner.

Given the client’s religious beliefs and lifelong dedication to being a follower of the Force, he confessed he was struggling with the taking up of arms that he was preparing for. While allowing that he has been trained to use his lightsaber and aspects of the Force in combat situations, he explained that the training had always been oriented around the idea of violence being a last resort. It is meant to be use in reaction, never preemptive action, and to protect the lives of others and the ideals of the Jedi. Jedi are actively discouraged to meet the actions of others with strength unless all other avenues have been explored.

Star Wars: Jedi of the Republic – Mace Windu (2017) #1

Star Wars: Jedi of the Republic – Mace Windu (2017) #1

And yet, Windu explained to this writer, given his reading of the Force and the readings of other Jedi whom he has great faith in, it seems that if the Jedi do not act at this time they will be eliminated. He struggled to articulate this idea to this writer, a problem no doubt further complicated by the writer’s own lack of faith in the ancient religion, but eventually managed to make the argument that given what the Force is “telling” him, the mission is an act of reaction, not a preemptive attack.

However, he continues to feel conflicted about this and, more pressingly, those under his command feel even more ambivalent about the idea of it. In fact, those that seem most convinced make Windu most concerned as convictions on such matters may preclude a slide into what he refers to as the “Dark Side.” As one might expect this “side” is a negative and a label assigned to those Jedi who lose their way and use their abilities for personal gain in some way. For instance, to control others, to protect one’s own family, friends, or desires over the needs of the masses, or to engage in some kind of sadism towards one’s enemies.

We explored these notions in depth, but, repeatedly, this therapist’s own lack of faith and knowledge in the Force presented a gulf between himself and the client. Given this, after discussing the matter in the room, the writer and the client determined he would be better served to work with a Force-familiar therapist.

Subsequently, he has been referred to Doctors Matt Owen and Denys Cowan. The next two appointments are set for August 30 and September 27 and can be found in files STAR WARS- JEDI OF THE REPUBLIC: MACE WINDU #1 and #2.

Given when Mace Windu lived in Star Wars history, Tim Stevens is pre-corruption by the Empire and therefore has not begun to act in what might charitably be referred to as “ethically dubious ways.” Do please try and keep up.

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Charles Soule on the Fall of a Knight and the Rise of a Dark Son.

With great power, there must also come great … fear, which leads to anger. And anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering. Such is the path Anakin Skywalker chose when he donned the mantle of Darth Vader and began his role as Sith Lord and Apprentice to the Emperor.

In Charles Soule and Giuseppe Camuncoli’s current run on DARTH VADER, the pair tell a story about Vader’s coming of age. We see him start his journey through his search for a kyber crystal; but unlike the challenge he faced as a student in the Jedi Temple, he must claim one from a Jedi and bend it to his will. And as we see, this proves to be no mean feat!

As Soule and Camuncoli continue to unfold the initial days of Vader’s journey further into the dark side, we begin to see there are more boundaries the nascent Sith Lord crosses on his pursuit of ultimate power over his enemies and the galaxy as a whole. We spent a few minutes chatting with Soule about Vader and the man he once was … and how far gone he has shifted away from the beloved Jedi Knight of old.

Marvel.com: Anakin’s forbidden romance with Padme Amidala eventually was key in turning Anakin to the dark side. Do you think this was one of the reasons the Jedi forbid the members of their order to maintain such emotional attachments? Or perhaps the Jedi were too strict in their vows and sowed the seeds of their own downfall in not allowing the Jedi to embrace their emotions more fully?

Charles Soule: Because I’ve been lucky enough to write a bunch of Star Wars stories set in all three of the major timelines active right now (Prequels, Original Trilogy and Episodes 7-9), I’ve thought about questions like this quite a bit. I can’t presume to know exactly what George Lucas intended by depicting the Jedi the way he did in the Prequels, but it certainly feels to me like they had become somewhat complacent, maybe even proud, after being ascendant for so long. I’m sure the “no attachments” rules made perfect sense at one time, and probably worked pretty well in most cases – but there are always scenarios that fall outside the rules, and Anakin and Padme seems like it was one of them.

Darth Vader (2017) #1

Darth Vader (2017) #1

Marvel.com: Watching Episodes I-III, it becomes increasingly clear how Palpatine quickly identifies Anakin and begins grooming him for apprenticeship. Does it ever strike you that none of the Jedi Masters were able to pick up on this at all? 

Charles Soule: Palpatine is pretty sly and subtle, and I think the Senate and the Jedi worked closely with each other all the time. I don’t think it’s that unusual that Palpatine would cultivate relationships with some of them – I doubt Anakin was the only Jedi he hung out with.

Marvel.com: Looking back, how aware do you think Vader is of Palpatine’s orchestration of his downfall and turning to the dark side? 

Charles Soule: I don’t think he saw it coming. I really don’t. I think he’d been told for so long that he was a perfect Jedi, the Chosen One, and that he could resist any temptation. He knew Palpatine had forbidden knowledge, but I think like many young people, he was pretty sure he could handle it, and knew better than those stodgy Jedi trying to keep him from saving the life of his great love.

Marvel.com: In looking at the story you’ve already revealed, with Vader’s search for a kyber crystal of his own to corrupt, there’s a real feeling that there isn’t much sacred to him. Are there any lines he won’t cross at this point?

Charles Soule: Public nudity. Beyond that, though… I think he’s seeking out darkness, because he wants to hide from his own actions and the price he’s paid for them. For Vader, at least right now, the darker the better.

Marvel.com: Speaking of crossing lines that shouldn’t be crossed, what can you share with us about your research into the Sith? What forbidden knowledge did you gain, and was there anything you came across that was of particular interest and/or surprised you? 

Charles Soule: We actually still don’t know that much about the Sith. Because there are only ever two at a time, and because they always lie to each other, it means that Sith “knowledge” is probably rewritten constantly to serve the needs of whichever SIth is master at any given time. I don’t think we can trust anything any Sith says, from Vader to Palpatine to Tyrannus, all the way down to Bane.

Darth Vader (2017) #5

Darth Vader (2017) #5

Marvel.com: I won’t point out the fact that last point is deals in absolutes, Charles …

Moving forward with DARTH VADER, we’ve seen Anakin kill fellow Jedi (including younglings), destroy communities, and seemingly shed the last vestiges of his humanity and former self. Is there anything left for him at this point or are all aspects of the past Jedi Knight lost until the coming of Luke?

Charles Soule: Hmm. I bet if there was anything he particularly liked to eat before, he still likes it after becoming Vader. That sort of thing doesn’t really change. Doesn’t mean he can actually eat it, though. Poor Vader. More machine than man.

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As our 40-part series ends, we look back at Marvel treating readers to “The Last Jedi!” in 1981.

We all know that the first Star Wars film changed the face of pop culture forever when it hit theaters 40 years ago—but it’s not just the movie that’s celebrating that milestone in 2017. Star Wars comics arrived with force in 1977, and hundreds of issues later, they’re more popular now than ever.

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of Star Wars, we’re looking back at our 40 favorite moments from the history of comics from a galaxy far, far away—one day at a time.

By now, you’re well aware that a short time from now in our very own galaxy, “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” hits theaters everywhere. In the spirit of the upcoming release of Episode VIII, the 40th and final entry in our “Celebrating Star Wars” series features a story you may not recall—but 1981’s STAR WARS #49 certainly does boast an intriguing title: “The Last Jedi!”

Outside of the mere appearances of Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia and the droids, however, a shared name is probably all that Episode VIII and STAR WARS #49 have in common. To that end, this adventure, set shortly after “The Empire Strikes Back,” features our heroes disguised for more than half of the issue—and it’s a safe bet that we won’t see Episode VIII’s Luke standing on the steps of his island hideaway wearing an eyepatch and red wig.

Star Wars (1977) #49

Star Wars (1977) #49

  • Published: April 21, 1981
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: April 15, 2015
  • Rating: All Ages
  • Writer: Mike W. Barr
  • Cover Artist: Walt Simonson
What is Marvel Unlimited?

The “last Jedi” referenced in the issue’s title is actually no Jedi at all, but rather a purple alien named Jedidiah, who suffered a traumatic brain injury while heroically defending the prince of Velmor. “His injuries robbed him of his reason,” Prince Denid tells Luke and Leia, who have arrived on a secluded planet to answer their distress signal. “He remembered only his lost dream of becoming a Jedi Knight…”

From there, our heroes rescue the shipwrecked duo and rush to return Denid to Velmor so that he can be properly crowned before his Empire-loving younger brother is declared king instead. Of course, a climactic battle ensues in order for Denid to claim his rightful rule—but not without some touching further heroics from Jedidiah. Luke himself greatly respects his actions and dubs Jedidiah “the last Jedi.”

As with every other comic featured in the Celebrating Star Wars series, STAR WARS #49 can be read in its entirety by anyone with a Marvel Unlimited subscription. It’s a fun curiosity that’s worth checking out. …Just don’t go in expecting any Episode VIII spoilers.

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