Is Logan truly back? This May, the hunt continues across the Marvel Universe!

Wolverine is back…or so it seems. Ever since MARVEL LEGACY #1, we’ve gotten glimpses of what appears to be Wolverine popping up across the Marvel Universe. But is it really Logan?

For a character with as rich a history as Wolverine—even though he sometimes couldn’t remember it all himself—telling the tale of his potential return can’t be contained to just one series. In April, THE HUNT FOR WOLVERINE #1 one-shot will be released, and then in May, four different four-part series will debut that will continue the story. As Wolverine’s past comes back to haunt many a mutant, each story will harken back to an old school adventure.

The event is orchestrated by HUNT FOR WOLVERINE and DEATH OF WOLVERINE writer Charles Soule, with a bevy of talent attached to the various titles. The four series are:

HUNT FOR WOLVERINE: WEAPON LOST (#1-4)
Written by Charles Soule
Art by Matteo Buffagni

HUNT FOR WOLVERINE: ADAMANTIUM AGENDA (#1-4)
Written by Tom Taylor
Art by R.B. Silva

HUNT FOR WOLVERINE: CLAWS OF A KILLER (#1-4)
Written by Mariko Tamaki
Art by Butch Guice

HUNT FOR WOLVERINE: MYSTERY IN MADRIPOOR (#1-4)
Written by Jim Zub
Art by Chris Bachalo

Check out a gallery of covers from the four series:

Said series editor Mark Paniccia, “I’ve been holding my tongue, just waiting to announce this project and team of ultra-talented creators. While these stories all reveal clues to the larger mystery behind Wolverine’s return, the writers all have some pretty huge moments planned that will have X-MEN fans talking and debating for some time to come.”

Major Marvel heroes like Daredevil, Kitty Pryde, Spider-Man and Iron Man, will become involved in the story, as they try to track down Logan and figure out his secrets. Each series will also contain its own distinct genre and mystery: WEAPON LOST will be a noir/detective story, ADAMANTIUM AGENDA more action/adventure focused, CLAWS OF A KILLER fits its title with a horror style, while MYSTERY IN MADRIPOOR is a dark romance.

Read More

Charles Soule and David Marquez unravel the mystery this April!

Snikt!

The sound rings across the universe…and can only mean one thing: the return of Wolverine!

He’s been popping up in some of your favorite books lately; holding an Infinity Stone, keeping his secrets close. But his return has been an unsolved mystery—until this April, when writer Charles Soule and artist David Marquez reveal the timeline of events that’ll lead to Logan’s shocking return with THE HUNT FOR WOLVERINE: ALPHA #1!

The 40-page issue, featuring a cover by Steve McNiven, begins the twisted tale of Logan’s reemergence. Then, this May, the story evolves into four different tales from different creative teams, each one containing its own distinct genre and mystery: action/adventure (Adamantium Agenda), horror (Claws of the Killer), dark romance (Mystery in Madripoor) and noir/detective (Weapon Lost.) And it’s all being orchestrated by the man that crafted the “Death of Wolverine” in the first place.

Soule recalls, “Steve McNiven and I took on the incredible task of killing Wolverine back in 2014—it was one of my earliest projects at Marvel, and such a huge opportunity. Intimidating, tricky, all of that—but ultimately, I think we created a book (alongside [inker] Jay Leisten, [colorist] Justin Ponsor and [letterer] Chris Eliopolous) that we’re all really proud of.” He continues, “There’s really only one project that could top it—being part of the story that brings Logan back! THE HUNT FOR WOLVERINE is just the opening chapters of a mystery that will reach all sorts of cool hidden corners of the Marvel Universe, and will tell a story that will hopefully have us looking at Logan in an entirely new way.”

“I’m really looking forward to seeing how fans start to put the pieces together,” says the scribe. “There’s a big payoff coming down the road, and all the interlocking parts of THE HUNT FOR WOLVERINE build to it. The more you read, the more clues you get. It’s really fun—especially since I have a bit of a reputation in X-continuity for knocking off beloved mutants. This time, it’s nice to be part of bringing someone back!”

THE HUNT FOR WOLVERINE: ALPHA #1 begins an epic story that will impact Marvel heroes and X-Men alike—and it culminates this summer in one of the most shocking, daring stories in Wolverine’s history! The journey—and the mystery—begins here, and you’re not going to want to miss your chance to take part in Wolverine’s return.

Writer Charles Soule and artist David Marquez’s THE HUNT FOR WOLVERINE: ALPHA #1 unfolds this April!

Read More

You can now pre-order this fearsome new figure of an unleashed Logan.

A new Wolverine Premium Format™ Figure is coming from Sideshow, featuring the iconic X-Men ready for battle. This polystone statue stands 20” tall, with Wolverine lunging forward atop a severed Sentinel hand base.

Wolverine has a savage portrait complete with a snarling expression and his iconic yellow and black mask. He is clad in a textured yellow and blue costume with a red X-Men insignia belt buckle and weathering from battles past.
Full to the brim with anger and Adamantium, Wolverine has unsheathed metal claws prepared to shred any other Sentinels that might stand in his way. His arms are sculpted with impressive musculature, bulging veins, and painted hair detail, attesting to his sheer strength and ferocity.

The Exclusive edition of the Wolverine Premium Format™ Figure includes an alternate unmasked portrait with his cowl drawn back, revealing Wolverine’s furious face, sporting his iconic wild hairstyle. Check out the gallery at the top of the page to see images of the figure, including the unmasked portrait.

The Wolverine Premium Format™ Figure is now available for pre-order from Sideshow Collectibles.

Read More

Actors Armitage, Adsit, Balaban and Mitchell cast in key roles for spring 2018 series.

Marvel New Media and top podcast listening service and content network Stitcher (“Heaven’s Gate,” “Katie Couric,” “The Paris Review”) today announced “Wolverine: The Long Night,” the first-ever Marvel scripted podcast, launching in spring 2018. The 10-episode series will be available exclusively on Stitcher Premium until fall 2018, when it will see a wide release across all podcast platforms.

The show’s cast includes notable actors Richard Armitage (“The Hobbit”), Scott Adsit (“30 Rock”), Bob Balaban (“Moonrise Kingdom”) and Brian Stokes Mitchell (“Mr. Robot”).

The “Wolverine: The Long Night” story is a captivating hybrid of mystery and the larger-scale fantasy of the Marvel Universe. It follows agents Sally Pierce (Celia Keenan-Bolger) and Tad Marshall (Ato Essandoh) as they arrive in the fictional town of Burns, Alaska, to investigate a series of murders and quickly discover the town lives in fear of a serial killer. The agents team up with deputy Bobby Reid (Andrew Keenan-Bolger) to investigate their main suspect, Logan (Richard Armitage). Their search leads them on a fox hunt through the mysterious and corrupt town.

The process behind the making of “Wolverine: The Long Night” brings Marvel’s storytelling expertise into the podcasting world, breaking new ground for the medium. To provide listeners a sense of immersion into the story, outdoor scenes will be recorded in realistic-sounding locations including forests and a cabin. In the studio, actors will be recorded in an ambisonic — or fully surround-sound — environment, allowing them to move, interact with one another and fully inhabit their characters.

“‘Wolverine: The Long Night’ brings our fans a whole new way to experience our iconic characters and the Marvel Universe,” said Dan Silver, vice president, head of platforms and content for Marvel New Media. “This tremendous cast will bring a thrilling level of intrigue and drama to our listeners. The character of Logan and this landscape make it the ideal premiere vehicle for us, and we’re excited to continue to explore the dynamic possibilities of the podcast medium.”

Also cast in the series are actors Zoe Chao, Chaske Spencer, Jordan Bridges, David Call, Michael J. Burg and Lannon Killia. Chris Gethard, host of the popular “Beautiful Stories from Anonymous People” podcast, also will make a cameo appearance.

“Podcasting is an incredible, intimate medium that’s perfect for telling stories, and I can’t think of a better partner with whom to push the boundaries of scripted podcasts than Marvel,” said Erik Diehn, CEO of Midroll Media, a podcast industry leader and the parent company of Stitcher. “They make every translation of their rich universe of characters into new media fresh and interesting while still retaining the feel and spirit of the original comics, and, as a Marvel fan, I’m proud that we’ve helped them do it again in podcasting. The arrival of Wolverine and his many fans to podcasts and Stitcher is truly a signal that this medium is a major part of the American media landscape.”

Stitcher and Marvel have assembled a writing and production team of veterans from both the comic book world and the podcasting industry. “Wolverine: The Long Night” is written by award-winning comic book author Ben Percy (“The Wilding,” “Red Moon”) and will be directed by Brendan Baker (formerly a producer for Radiotopia’s “Love & Radio”). Chloe Prasinos (formerly a producer for Gimlet’s “Reply All”) will oversee sound design. The series is produced by Daniel Fink of Marvel and Jenny Radelet of Stitcher.

For more information, visit www.wolverinepodcast.com.

Read More

His creative contemporaries and successors remember legend Len Wein!

Additional reporting by TJ Dietsch

“If you really want to tangle with someone—why not try your luck against—the Wolverine!”

Imagine: It’s the summer of 1974. You’ve just read to the end of INCREDIBLE HULK #180—the newest issue—and a brand-new character nearly leaps out of the art at you with claws extended. You’re just not sure how you’ll be able to stand the wait until the next installment to see what’s up with this new mystery man, and then you turn to the book’s credit page and wonder how this Len Wein guy keeps coming up with all this cool stuff…

“The Wolverine” moved on past his throwdown with The Hulk and Wendigo to become one of the most popular comic book characters ever when he hooked up with a certain band of merry mutants a few months later in GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1—also written by that Len Wein guy. Today, the long line of legacy from the writer through his creation to modern scribes and artists stands as a testament to the impact Wolverine’s made on the comics industry and its fans.

“In that seminal issue, Len established Wolverine’s blunt, pugnacious, take-no-prisoners voice as a character,” posits X-MEN: GOLD writer Marc Guggenheim. “Sure, Wolverine would become less verbose and chatty in future incarnations, but his blunt attitude was established in that first appearance in INCREDIBLE HULK.”

“It’s incredible how Len Wein, along with artist Herb Trimpe, shaped Wolverine perfectly from the very start,” says ULTIMATE WOLVERINE VS. HULK artist Leinil Francis Yu. “That [debut] is 40-years-old and it still reads like the Wolverine we have today, complete with the attitude and richness we all love about him.”

Mike Deodato, himself a veteran X-Men illustrator and current artist on OLD MAN LOGAN, agrees: “He is a rebel; he is rock n’ roll. He doesn’t care for anything or anybody, but at the same time he will give his life for them. He is savage, unpredictable, and that is what makes him so attractive.”

“It’s the physicality—short, hairy, like a gnarled old tree—and the indomitable spirit, I think,” ponders DEATH OF WOLVERINE writer Charles Soule when considering Wein’s mutant scrapper. “Wolverine never stops, no matter what gets thrown in his way. Because of his healing factor, it’s almost like he can’t stop. He’s very fun to write, but more importantly, very fun to read.”

Wolverine’s Canadian heritage made him something of a rarity at that time among super heroes, as well as his direct approach to problems in his path.

“In many ways, Wolverine was so unlike any character readers were really familiar with,” one-time WOLVERINE writer Cullen Bunn insists. “He was violent and vicious, but a hero, too. The mystery element was heavily ingrained in the character, which made him all the more interesting. He was working for the government, but beyond that, we didn’t know much about him. Maybe more than any character created before or since, he represented the potential for amazing stories ahead. Other creators capitalized on that potential, making Wolverine the household character he is today.”

“I think Wein created the ultimate outcast,” says Juann Cabal, the artist behind ALL-NEW WOLVERINE. “To me, Logan is the outcast among outcasts. To Wein’s credit, [he] gave him the appeal of being different, wild and mysterious without falling strictly into the antihero cliché. He might have his inner demons, but his moral compass is always pointing the right direction. In my opinion, this is what has made the character stay relevant all this time.”

Perhaps Cabal’s partner on ALL-NEW WOLVERINE, writer Tom Taylor, sums it up best when he notes that “there was something perfectly realized about that first appearance of Wolverine.”

“It was all there on the page. The attitude was there, the brash bravery. But Wolverine was also not infallible. He had a savagery, and wasn’t a perfect, untouchable hero. It was a character everyone wanted to see more of. And, clearly, the rest of the world did too. There have been so many great Wolverine stories. None would exist without Len.”

By summer of ’74, Wein’s comic career stood as relatively new, though he’d racked up a sizable number of scripts for a variety of titles. He’d taken over INCREDIBLE HULK only an issue before “the big one” but his introduction—along with artist Herb Trimpe and costume designer John Romita—of Wolverine to fight the jade giant forever cemented him into the firmament of comic book superstars.

He also, by all accounts, kept his feet firmly panted on solid ground.

“I got to meet Len a number of times in 2014 while I was writing the DEATH OF WOLVERINE story, as well as working on a long run featuring one of his other signature creations, Swamp Thing, over at DC,” says Soule. “I found him to be gracious and kind, and generous with his conversation and time. He dreamed up enormous swaths of the super hero landscape that will last for generations—a legacy most could only dream of.”

“First and foremost, Len’s creation of the ‘All-New, All-Different’ X-Men was seismic and industry-changing,” notes Guggenheim. “Without Len, there’s an excellent argument to be made that there wouldn’t be any X-Men today, and certainly not the X-Men that we’ve come to know, love, and cherish. I had the good fortune to meet Len a few years ago at San Diego Comic-Con and he truly couldn’t have been a nicer guy.  He clearly loved comics, both the industry and the medium.”

“As a creator, I think the truly incredible thing you discover writing [his] characters is just how different they are, and how human,” offers Taylor. “They have flaws. They’re complex. They struggle. Len’s characters breathe.”

Bunn takes it one step further: “Len’s work was a huge influence on me. Like many of my absolute favorite creators, he wore his imagination on his sleeve, and he didn’t let anything hold him back from putting that on the page.

“Since I owe my whole career to Wolverine, Len and Herb’s creation means a ton to me,” says Yu. “We may be divided by a few decades, but I am proud to inherit and to continue to breathe life into Wolverine and the X-Men.”

“As a fan, Len created some of my absolute favorite heroes,” concludes Taylor. “Some of these characters are the reason I’m a comics fan.

“The world would have been a far less heroic place without Len Wein.”

Read More

Two Wolverines lock claws in a memorable match-up drawn by Ramon Rosanas!

Ever since DEATH OF WOLVERINE, readers have felt a Logan-sized hole in their lives. Other clawed individuals have stepped in to do some of the jobs other heroes won’t touch like Laura Kinney, who now holds the name Wolverine, and Old Man Logan, but what about the original? With the publication of GENERATIONS: WOLVERINE & ALL-NEW WOLVERINE this week by writer Tom Taylor and artist Ramon Rosanas, we’ll finally have a few answers.

We got in touch with Rosanas about reuniting the clone and her fallen mentor in an issue that celebrates the House of Ideas’ long history of legacy heroes.

Marvel.com: Ever since the “Death of Wolverine” story, people have been wondering when Logan would make his return to comics. How does it feel to be drawing this huge issue in his history?

Ramon Rosanas: Very proud! Wolverine is one of the most loved characters and to be part of his story makes me feel very happy.

Marvel.com: Laura’s gone through a good deal of changes since Logan died. What can you tell us about the emotional connection they will feel when reunited and how that comes across on the page?

Ramon Rosanas: It’s really magical. They are two strong characters. Finding them in an emotional union is a key moment in their personality. I love to draw emotions. I already did it with Deadpool and Ant-Man. I feel comfortable with these stories and this script has given me touching moments.

Marvel.com: Laura might be the All-New Wolverine, but Logan’s the classic model. How do they compare when leaping into battle in this issue?

Ramon Rosanas: They are two generations. Getting them together has been great. I love to see them in that kind of relationship formed between parents and children when you discover that your daughter surpasses you, that she has taken a few steps ahead of you but that you can still protect and teach her many things.

Marvel.com: What can you tell us about the kind of trouble Laura and Logan get up to in this issue and did it offer a lot of design opportunities for you?

Ramon Rosanas: I have enjoyed drawing ninjas and Japanese settings. I have experimented giving the scenes an aspect close to the Manga style; although that has also given me a few headaches in combining both styles of work. I have been allowed to draw Logan in his classic outfit, in civilian clothes, and in his usual T-shirt as the story progressed. And I did the same with Laura, leaving her with a T-shirt like Logan, as if he was “passing the baton.”

Marvel.com: How has it been working with Tom and the gang on this issue?

Ramon Rosanas: I have been part of a great team. I have been able to work with Mark Paniccia whom I love and admire. He was the first editor to open the doors for me in Marvel and to work with him is always really great.

Tom is a great writer. The script describes everything I need to know but at the same time Tom leaves me room to adapt it. He has done a magnificent job throughout the whole episode. I cannot wait to hear from the fans.

Slice and dice alongside Logan and Laura in GENERATIONS: WOLVERINE & ALL-NEW WOLVERINE, available this week from Tom Taylor and Ramon Rosanas!

Read More

With Miles Morales held by Hydra, check out these other heroes who have spent time behind bars.

Not every hero in the Marvel Universe stays on the right side of the law. Sometimes they go one step too far—and other times, the law works actively against them. Take Miles Morales for instance: the SPIDER-MAN star fought against the vision Ulysses gave him back in CIVIL WAR II and surrendered himself to Hydra instead of killing Captain America.

Surely the former denizen of the Ultimate Universe will find his way out of the clink—but until then, he can take solace in the fact that a few of his fellow heroes have had their own stints under lock and key.

CAPTAIN AMERICA

Look at that, even the honorable Steve Rogers spent time in the pen! More than once, too! Most notably, Cap was locked up between his surrender in the last issue of CIVIL WAR and his apparent death in CAPTAIN AMERICA #25.

LUKE CAGE

Carl Lucas might have become a hero without heading to jail, but he probably wouldn’t be super strong and possess his signature impervious skin. Wrongfully accused in a drug bust and sentenced to the big house, the future Avenger agreed to participate in an experiment that gave him super abilities. After his transformation, he escaped from captivity and resumed life under the name we all know him by today.

PUNISHER

Over the years, many people have wanted to lock Frank Castle up—but no one seems capable of actually keeping him imprisoned. During the mid-‘90s, the authorities tried to send him to the electric chair—and failed. And during the most recent PUNISHER WAR ZONE, he sat in an underwater prison, but of course no walls—not even ones surrounded by water—could stop The Punisher.

DAREDEVIL

At the end of Brian Michael Bendis’ epic run on DAREDEVIL, he left ol’ Matt Murdock in quite a pickle—inside a jail cell where new series writer Ed Brubaker kept the blind lawyer incarcerated for a while. Murdock eventually got out when none other than master escape artist Frank Castle was purposefully captured as part of a jailbreak plan.

SONGBIRD

Since their inception, the Thunderbolts revolved around characters who served time in one way or another. The original squad, including Songbird, was assembled by Baron Zemo and consisted of villains masquerading as heroes. After her stint in jail, the former Screaming Mimi took to the lawful side of things—and even served as a warden on the maximum security prison known as the Raft!

IRON FIST

During CIVIL WAR, nearly every hero who sided against Tony Stark’s Superhuman Registration Act wound up incarcerated—including Iron Fist. While posing as Daredevil in an attempt to keep Hell’s Kitchen safe, Danny Rand was captured as a means to help Captain America and the other anti-registration heroes to the Negative Zone prison for a jailbreak!

WOLVERINE

Not at all unfamiliar with jail cells, Wolverine found himself imprisoned in the pages of LOGAN. Captured by the Japanese during World War II, the mutant was kept in Nagasaki before he escaped and fell in love with a local woman named Atsuko. When Atsuko was murdered, Logan followed her killer to Hiroshima, where they were caught in the atomic bombing of the city. Wolverine survived the blast, but was left scarred by the loss of his former love.

BUCKY BARNES

Even though he stepped up and filled in for Steve Rogers after the original Cap died, Bucky Barnes still stood trial for his crimes as his previous identity, the Winter Soldier. Declared innocent in the United States, Russia judged him differently—and locked him up on heightened charges. Thanks to help from someone familiar with Russian prisons—Black Widow—Bucky escaped and headed back to the U.S., where he then decided that his days holding the mantle of Captain America were over.

PETER PARKER

Miles Morales doesn’t lay claim as the only Spider-Man to wind up incarcerated—back in AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #219, Peter Parker attempted to sneak into a jail as part of an exposé, but instead got caught and tossed in a cell! After Matt Murdock helped him get out of the predicament, Pete managed to publish his exposé—and apprehend a few escaped inmates in the process.

Go behind bars with SPIDER-MAN #20, by writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Oscar Bazaldua, available September 6!

 

Read More

Look back at some classic adventures set in the Land of the Rising Sun!

CABLE #2—due out June 28—finds our hero traveling back in time to feudal Japan in pursuit of a mysterious adversary! Marvel heroes have a long history of traveling to Asia’s island nation, so take a look back at five other stories set in the land of the rising sun.

Wolverine (1982) #1

Wolverine (1982) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?
WOLVERINE
Wolverine stories could easily dominate any list of the best comics set in Japan, so let’s start with the “best there is”—the original WOLVERINE #1-4, by Chris Claremont and Frank Miller. One of Marvel’s first limited series redefined the character as he traveled to Japan to find his long-lost love, Mariko Yashida. Shingen, her crimelord father, forced her to marry one of his stooges, which did not set well with Logan. Miller and colorist Glynis Oliver provide ninja fights amidst the neon lights of Tokyo, making this not only the must-read Wolverine tale, but also one of the quintessential works within comics as a whole.

Fantastic Four/Iron Man: Big in Japan (2005) #1

Fantastic Four/Iron Man: Big in Japan (2005) #1

  • Published: October 05, 2005
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: November 13, 2007
  • Rating: T
What is Marvel Unlimited?
FANTASTIC FOUR & IRON MAN
While action and drama typically drive Wolverine’s journeys to Japan, “fun” fueled this comic by Zeb Wells and the late Seth Fisher.  The Fantastic Four head abroad for a ribbon-cutting ceremony at Tokyo’s new Giant Monster Museum and Expo Center, when—you guessed it—giant monsters attack. Luckily Iron Man also had business in the area and joined the fray. Fisher created each monster as a dedicated work of art for an insanely delightful story that never lets up.

Big Hero 6 (2008) #1

Big Hero 6 (2008) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?
BIG HERO SIX
Before jumping to the big screen, Hiro, Baymax and the rest of the team starred in two different series: one by Scott Lobdell and Gus Vasquez in 1998, and another by Chris Claremont and David Nakayama in 2008. When the Japanese government decides they need their own team of heroes, they recruit Silver Samurai, Honey Lemon, and the rest of the crew, who battle the likes of Everwraith and Yandroth.

5 Ronin (2010) #1

5 Ronin (2010) #1

What is Marvel Unlimited?
5 RONIN
The 2011 series 5 RONIN recast Hulk, Wolverine, Deadpool, Punisher, and Psylocke as master-less samurai living in 17th century Japan. Featuring the work of Peter Milligan and a variety of artists, including covers by David Aja, each issue told the story of one of the five characters, whose destines became interlinked as they sought revenge against the dreaded Damiyo.

Punisher War Journal (1988) #8

Punisher War Journal (1988) #8

  • Published: September 10, 1989
  • Added to Marvel Unlimited: May 27, 2010
What is Marvel Unlimited?
THE PUNISHER
Back in 1989, Carl Potts and Jim Lee introduced The Punisher to a group called the Shadowmasters, who graduated from PUNISHER WAR JOURNAL into their own series. This ancient clan of martial arts masters protected the province of Iga, and Punisher came into contact with one of them, Kathryn Yakamoto, who helped him infiltrate a ninja camp run by a shady American corporation. Later Frank Castle and Black Widow teamed up with them again against the Sunrise Society, a Japanese business used as a cover for a crime syndicate.

Travel to Japan once more with CABLE #2 by James Robinson and Carlos Pacheco!

Read More

Artist Mike Deodato pops his claws in an exclusive sketchbook!

With OLD MAN LOGAN #25, a new creative team will take over the exploits of the time-displaced Wolverine from a horrible future. Writer Ed Brisson and artist Mike Deodato take over with the June 14 issue and launch the title hero right into trouble!

Deodato’s no stranger to the world of sharp-clawed mutants, having drawn covers for OLD MAN LOGAN and also Wolvie’s son Daken in the pages of DARK AVENGERS, but he’s a longtime fan who’s excited to chronicle the elder Wolverine’s exploits. We talked with the artist about shifting from occasional cover craftsman to interior artist, working with Brisson, and channeling Logan’s years of experience and torment into a more grizzled version of the ol’ Canucklehead.

Marvel.com: You’ve done a few covers for OLD MAN LOGAN already; does that help get you ready for tackling the ongoing series or is it different muscles?

Mike Deodato: It does, but I think what helps the most is the love I feel for the character. He was the only character [on] Marvel’s roster I ever campaigned to draw. I remember bothering [Marvel Editor-in-Chief] Axel Alonso back in 2008 [until] he gave me a one-shot called WOLVERINE: ROAR, which [would have] led me to be the main artist on WOLVERINE: ORIGINS…until [writer Brian Michael] Bendis comes up with a book he created [especially] for me that I couldn’t refuse: DARK AVENGERS! I was happy and at the same time sad for leaving the book but then Axel promised I’d return to Wolvie someday. Nine years later, promise fulfilled. I am back!

Marvel.com: Wolverine’s one of the most well recognized characters around; how does the Old Man Logan version differentiate himself from his past self, aside from the obvious physical differences?

Mike Deodato: He is a way more experienced warrior and therefore, way more dangerous. He might have a bit slower reflexes, speed, and healing factor, but as with most of the great fighters, he developed a conscience about fighting that makes his timing almost flawless. On the other hand, he’s got much more anger inside because he has not only the scars from his past, but also from his future. His already tormented soul is now a purgatory nightmare.

Marvel.com: Old Man Logan has more of a look than a costume; will you be playing with that at all in the series?

Mike Deodato: You know Logan; his clothes will be shredded to rags most of the time. I’ll be lucky if I can draw them in one piece once in a while. Seriously, Logan is one of the few characters that looks interesting with or without a costume on.

Marvel.com: You and Ed are kicking off a new arc on this series. What new directions are you planning on going?

Mike Deodato: I see him back to his roots, a lonely hunter clawing his way out through his enemies. For me it is a good ol’ [Clint] Eastwood movie.

Marvel.com: Do you enjoy bouncing between the present and Old Man Logan’s future/past in the Wasteland?

Mike Deodato: Yes, I do! I love post-apocalyptic stories, and it is great to play with the environment [Old Man Logan co-creator Mark] Millar envisioned.

Marvel.com: How has it been working with Ed on the series so far?

Mike Deodato: He is the greatest! He knows how to work suspense so well it gives me the creeps just by reading the script. I truly hope we stay together for the long run.

Brisson and Deodato kick off their OLD MAN LOGAN tenure with a snikt on June 14 with issue #25!

Read More

Meet Matt Murdock and five other heroes who tried to hide their IDs!

During Mark Waid and Chris Samnee’s epic run on DAREDEVIL, Matt Murdock let the world know his true identity. But somehow, that secret went back into the bottle before the start of the current series. Now, almost two years later, Charles Soule and Ron Garney have begun to reveal how exactly that happened.

Daredevil’s not the only Marvel stalwart who received a second chance at a secret identity. Some heroes, in fact, have gone to some pretty lengthy extremes to restore theirs. Here’s a look at a few of them…


Daredevil

The Man Without Fear’s latest efforts to restore his secret come after a number of attempts and accidents that left him exposed.

Way back in the original DAREDEVIL #24, Spider-Man, of all people, wrote a letter to Matt Murdock telling him he knew his secret—but he promised he wouldn’t tell anybody. Too late, Wallcrawler; Foggy Nelson and Karen Page read the letter. Matt covers up his secret by creating a fictional twin brother: Mike Murdock.

Eventually Mike “dies,” but DD’s identity woes don’t end there. In one instance a TV station broadcasts Matt’s secret, but Black Panther helps save it by dressing as Daredevil. Many others discovered his secret ID over the years, leading to a storyline where he continued to deny it while a tabloid tried to out him. That song and dance continued until our hero went public and told everyone—leading us to the current storyline.

Spider-Man

Spider-Man not only almost screwed up his buddy’s secret identity, he’s had plenty of close calls himself. The list of people who knew Spider-Man’s real name grew over the years, and then during the first Civil War event, Peter Parker took Tony Stark’s advice and revealed his true name and face to the world.

But only for a short time. The “One More Day” storyline saw Spidey sacrifice his marriage to Mary Jane to Mephisto in order to save Aunt May’s life. A few years later, a tale called “One Moment in Time” revealed how time “reset” itself after the couple made that call—and why Peter decided he needed his secret identity back. Kingpin came after several of our hero’s loved ones, so the Webslinger asked Doctor Strange to cast a spell to make everyone forget his secret. Working with Tony Stark and Reed Richards, the Sorcerer Supreme did the deed, with only Peter and MJ escaping its effect.


Captain America

In the late 1980s, John Walker temporarily replaced Steve Rogers as Captain America after the government tried to make Steve part of their political agenda. The new Cap’s tenure proved difficult, and eventually the powers-that-be decided to hand the suit and shield back to his predecessor. In the press conference announcing the return of the original, a member of the militant Watchdogs apparently assassinates Walker—but only “apparently.” The staged shooting allowed the former Cap to put his old life and mistakes behind him and return in a new identity: U.S. Agent.


Wolverine

During the Fall of the Mutants, the X-Men, including Wolverine, gave their lives on television to save the world from a being called The Adversary. The goddess Roma, however, took pity on the mutant heroes, resurrecting and giving them the opportunity to operate in secret. She even made them “invisible” to any sort of surveillance beyond regular eyesight.

While the X-Men moved to Australia and established a secret base, Wolverine had his own agenda—and storylines—going on in his solo title. Logan established a new identity, Patch, on the island of Madripoor, where he engaged in an underworld battle with the local crime lords. The eye patch kept his resurrection somehow “secret,” despite the iconic claws and hairdo.


Iron Man

Back in 1998, Captain America and Iron Man teamed up in the aptly titled IRON MAN/CAPTAIN AMERICA ‘98 ANNUAL. In the story, Tony Stark and Steve Rogers battled A.I.M. and M.O.D.O.K., and we learned in a flashback that the duo also took on Mentallo, who had created a way to control the minds of everyone on Earth. Iron Man not only took out the telepathic villain, but also used his technology to make everyone forget his secret identity. Years later, it wouldn’t matter, as Tony revealed his name and face to the entire world again anyway.


Thor

To teach his son humility, Odin stripped Thor of his memories as a god and sent him to Earth as Donald Blake, a mortal medical student with an injured leg. Eventually Blake discovered his true origin, and Thor spent time on Earth not only in his godly, heroic identity, but also as the good doctor. Eventually the Thunder God gave up his ability to turn into his human alter ego.

Years later, when Thor decided he wanted a life on Earth again, he didn’t ask Odin for another spell. Instead, he turned to Nick Fury, who created a new civilian identity for him: Sigurd Jarlson. Transforming into Jarlson didn’t require Thor striking his hammer on stone; it only needed civilian clothing and, of all things, a pair of glasses—who would use a pair of glasses to try and hide their true identity?

The saga of Matt Murdock’s secret identity continues in DAREDEVIL #19, on sale this week, and concludes in issue #20, available May 17, both from Charles Soule and Ron Garney!

Read More